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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakleigh East, Sunny Vic
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    628

    Default Controlling bluestain mould on newly cut timber

    Hi,
    I have recently cut some green timber which I am trying to air dry. Blue stain mould has started to appear, especially in this rainy weather.
    As these are pale timbers, ( elm, ash and oak) I would like to control this if possible.
    I just went out and sprayed them with diluted White King - don't know how good this will be.
    Anyone have any suggestions?
    Cheers,
    Steck

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Hervey Bay QLD
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    319

    Default

    Generally I think if you use the same species for you sticks or racking out this should not happen? Also try and keep them dry as possible

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    74
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    9,327

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chowcini View Post
    Generally I think if you use the same species for you sticks or racking out this should not happen? Also try and keep them dry as possible
    Don't think the sticker species makes any difference Chowchini! But the second bit of advice is spot-on. The fungus is a pretty pervasive species, and will seek you out wherever you try to hide. However, it only operates down to about 25% MC, if I recall correctly, so the idea is to get the 'free' water out as quickly as possible. If you can circulate some dry air through the stack in the initial drying phase, that would help.
    Good luck - I've harvested a few pale woods over the years, with varying succes. The last lot I got was from a tall stump of crapiata that had been left standing for several weeks in the weather before I got my hands on it. It is just about completely blue. Fortunately, the fungus lives on the free carbohydtates & doesn't chew up the cell walls like some other fungi do, & doesn't affect structural strength, at least not initially. So my badly stained material is fine for the bench it's going into. In fact, if you look on it as a feature, it can be quite attractive....
    Cheers,
    IW

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakleigh East, Sunny Vic
    Posts
    628

    Default

    Thanks for the responses.
    The timber is very fresh and moisture content is therefore very high. It is stored outside so it's a bit hard to control the conditions.
    The white king has temporarily knocked the bluestain on the head - I don't know how it will go longer term.
    I agree - a lot of bluestain can look good. A little can just look dirty!
    Cheers,
    Steck

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Brookfield, Brisbane
    Posts
    5,800

    Default

    i cut a lot of hoop pine and blue stain is a big problem with this.

    i use a chemical called hylite 80 it removes the starch from the exterior of teh timber stoping the fungas from geting a grip.

    blue stain is a fungas that eats the starch in the wood, i think it only starts under 25% mc and will not efect timber unday 18 or sompthing like that.

    you need to dry the timber as quickly as possible. with good air flow. a fan blowing threw the stack is usualy enough to stop it sticking. good sized stickers 1" x 1".

    www.carlweiss.com.au
    Mobile Sawmilling & Logging Service
    8" & 10" Lucas Mills, bobcat, 4wd tractor, 12 ton dozer, stihl saws.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakleigh East, Sunny Vic
    Posts
    628

    Default

    Thanks Carl,
    I will have to rely on improving airflow, I think.
    I have an industrial fan (1m across) in the shed - hope it doesn't blow the timber out the door!
    Cheers,
    Steck

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    warragul, victoria australia
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    I am told the yanks will pay premium dollars for blue stain might be worth shipping it out...lol
    I am told that sharpening handsaws is a dying art.... this must mean I am an artisan.

    Get your handsaws sharpened properly to the highest possible standard, the only way they should be done, BY HAND, BY ME!!! I only accept perfection in any saw I sharpen.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
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    9,327

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Edwards View Post
    I am told the yanks will pay premium dollars for blue stain might be worth shipping it out...lol
    I doubt it's blue stain they want Travis - they can get plenty of that themselves. I think it's spalting, the black spidery lines formed by a different fungus, that's more of a prize.
    Spalting is much more unpredictable, and it does chew the wood up if you leave it too long, unlike bluestain. The drawer fronts on these nesting tables are spalted & bluestained - the flash has wiped out the colour on the top piece, but it shows up the spalt lines clearly.

    Cheers,
    IW

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