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  1. #1
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    Default Images of Red Cedar Trees.

    I trust it is okay to put this link here.
    I grow Red Cedar trees here on my farm. I take it all rather seriously and have done an inventory, measured and numbered them and placed them on a mudmap. I have made a concession to the modern world and recently have been uploading photographs of them onto this internet site. Most of the trees are natural regeneration and just a few I have planted. I like the idea that,over time, as the trees grow and are eventually harvested and sawn up, that who ever gets the pleasure of the wood can see a little of how they have grown and what is a bend or a branch in the tree is the source of that beautiful figured wood. Is it possible to also look at the images, all of one species, as an act of aesthetic appreciation? Each RC tree is unique in its form.
    In my inventory, there are over 750 trees although a few have died. I'm still a bit dubious of the link so I will initially only give one link for the album of trees numbering from one to 250.
    If there is any interest, I could add the links of the other two albums.
    Photobucket

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  3. #2
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    They are a lovely tree. There are are still quite a few old ones around where I live but they are normally in VERY inaccessible spots which explains why they were never harvested I guess. They really stand out amongst the gums at the right time of year.

    Thanks for the images.

    Mick.

  4. #3
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    Thanks. Iíve been making furniture from red cedar for over 25 years and I had no idea what the tree looked like.
    Iíd always imagined it looked like a eucalypt, but itís nothing like it.

  5. #4
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    Mick, None of my trees would be really old. I don't think anything survived the initial clearing about 100 years ago. All have come up since then as the rainforest reclaims the land again. Yes, the new growth stands out against the rest of the forest.
    Jack, so pleased that you can see where that wonderful comes from. With the RC, we are not so keen on the straight ones but prefer the bends and the figured wood. I'd like to think the furniture owners can appreciate the source as well.

  6. #5
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    G.day Bob luckily enough i have one in the backyard about 40 foot tall.I can count about 8 just driving up the road in peoples yards or on the side of the road. And this is a couple of minutes from a main highway. If you drive up the road a bit and go into the escarpment there are a lot of cedar trees probably only babies when the serious logging happened.

    cheers......Roy

  7. #6
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    Hi Bob, the link doesnít seem to be working for me?

  8. #7
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    Magnificent trees with a lot of European history attached. Sadly this is all that is left of the Gadgarra Red Cedar

    A Snail's Eye View: Death of a cedar

    ABC Radio had an excellent "Hindsight" program "In Search of Red Gold: the story of red cedar" audio can be downloaded here it is an hour long though.


    In Search of Red Gold: the story of red cedar - Hindsight - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
    Mobyturns

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  9. #8
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    Default More Images


  10. #9
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    Beardly, I thought that the link worked most of the times. Maybe try again?
    Sure tragic about the death of the large NQ tree. There is tragedy here as well with deaths from dry weather and over stocking on occasions.
    I did hear the ABC program about RC a few years ago. I think there were some things I didn't agree with but can't now exactly remember what.

  11. #10
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    Hereís a pic this morning out my back door here in Sydney.
    Plant em they grow.
    Just keep the moth off em for the first 12 years or so.
    You might not benefit but if more people thought like Bob, future generations will.
    H
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    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Whitworth View Post
    Beardly, I thought that the link worked most of the times. Maybe try again?
    Sure tragic about the death of the large NQ tree. There is tragedy here as well with deaths from dry weather and over stocking on occasions.
    I did hear the ABC program about RC a few years ago. I think there were some things I didn't agree with but can't now exactly remember what.
    Some of the timeline of exploitation does not seem to agree with other sources I have read.
    Mobyturns

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  13. #12
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    H,
    Looks good! I've known a couple of RC's in the suburbs. One sure grew well. Perhaps there was no tip moth borer there? I don't know what your site is like but if it gets a bit dry, they would appreciate some water. If it was here, it would be included in my register. Maybe you could measure its growth?

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Whitworth View Post
    Beardly, I thought that the link worked most of the times. Maybe try again?
    Sure tragic about the death of the large NQ tree. There is tragedy here as well with deaths from dry weather and over stocking on occasions.
    I did hear the ABC program about RC a few years ago. I think there were some things I didn't agree with but can't now exactly remember what.
    I am viewing from an iPad and I canít get any of the links to work it just comes up with a blank page with app.photobucket.com in the browser

    I have quite a few cedar trees on my property including a lot of saplings, they certainly are a beautiful tree

  15. #14
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    Sorry, I really have no idea as to why the link isn't working. It is meant to work if that means anything.
    I think the saplings are worth looking after especially if they are in a reasonable site, that is moisture and soil. They also might need being given some space to grow into especially if what is around them is useless like a faulty wattle or lantana. Obviously I like the idea of measure them just to see how they are getting on.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Whitworth View Post
    H,
    Looks good! I've known a couple of RC's in the suburbs. One sure grew well. Perhaps there was no tip moth borer there? I don't know what your site is like but if it gets a bit dry, they would appreciate some water. If it was here, it would be included in my register. Maybe you could measure its growth?
    Bob, I put it in a shade cloth tube for its first 10 years or so.
    There was a self seeded Sally Wattle that sprung up beside it and quickly grew taller.
    I guess this made it think it had to grow up through the canopy.
    The Sally Wattle was shallow rooted and blew over in a storm.
    I towed it back upright with my ute and tied it to some steel stakes and it lasted a few more years.
    The moth is here but it took it a long time to find the Cedar.
    They visit every year now and the tips split and a lot fall off from them burrowing in.
    I visited your place about 2/3 years back, glad to see your lovely trees and yourself are ok.
    I never thought to measure it !
    I guess I should just chuck a tape around it?
    A mate has one a few years older than mine on the North Side, itís a bit taller than mine but not as big in the butt. Closer to his house so maybe gone up for the sun.
    H
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

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