Thanks Thanks:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: A Log for ID

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,857

    Default A Log for ID

    Photos below.

    The photos were taken in direct sunlight at 2pm.

    I bought it at a turning exhibition, so there were a few folks having a look at it. Some things which people said:

    -Definitely not a Gidgee, but similar
    -Possibly some kind of Lancewood

    It's hard and heavy and seems stable.

    It came from just west of Ravenshoe, QLD.

    It's partially seasoned.

    If I can say more to help I will. Feel free to ask.

    Looking forward to responses.

    Cheers,
    Luke

    IMG_2348.jpgIMG_2349.jpgIMG_2350.jpgIMG_2351.jpgIMG_2352.jpg

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Cherrybrook,NSW
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Mulga would be my guess.
    Cheers WC

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    dubbo
    Posts
    45

    Default

    Inland rosewood.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Nerang Queensland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    10,764

    Default

    Bark is wrong for Inland Rosewood, Gidgee and a lot of Mulgas & Lancewoods I know. Could still be an Acacia but my guess would be an ironbark
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,347

    Default

    Don't think there is any Mulga 'just west of Ravenshoe', Luke, unless the locals are REALLY stretching their country miles!

    I'd be pretty sure it's an Acacia, but no idea which - there are just so many of them, and so many look pretty similar when reduced to a half log! The best hope of an accurate id is if the supplier or someone from the area sees your post, and can nail the precise species for you. Otherwise it's a "dry country Acacia".....

    Cheers,

    Edit: I agree with Neil, I think A. rhodoxylon is definitely out - it has a peculiar scaly bark which I've not seen on any other Acacia - see here for a pic...
    IW

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    texas, queensland
    Posts
    1,239

    Default

    grain looks to open or not tight enough for iron bark , though the bark looks close and the border between the sap wood and the heart wood is not sharp enough for iron bark , well the iron bark that we have around here anyway . the timber grain looks more like one of the blood woods .

    johno
    'If the enemy is in range, so are you.'

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Central Queensland
    Age
    59
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Maybe look at a more 'eastern' woodland wattle like Acacia aulacocarpa and A. disparrima. Most of the wattles mentioned above are from western downs, southern brigalow and channel country. Ravenshoe is stony northern upland, rather different country.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,857

    Default

    The photos on Google images for A. aulacocarpa are very similar to this wood. The common name is Brown Salwood.

    Anyone have any thoughts on this?

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,882

    Default

    It does look a bit like Mulga but if it came from just west of Ravenshoe, I'd guess Sally Wattle.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,347

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redmower View Post
    Maybe look at a more 'eastern' woodland wattle like Acacia aulacocarpa and A. disparrima. Most of the wattles mentioned above are from western downs, southern brigalow and channel country. Ravenshoe is stony northern upland, rather different country.
    Really depends on how far 'just west' is, redmower. The country immediately around Ravenshoe itself is hardly what I'd call 'stony' - it's mostly basaltic soils, but it does change very quickly as you go west off the Tablelands toward Mt. Garnet. There is a big range of forest types along the edge of the ranges. Ravenshoe had rainforest on the eastern side of the town, grading rapidly via wet sclerophyl forest to drier Stringybark forest, then open savannah woodland. That's why I was querying how far west of the town our wood hails from - a few hundred metres could radically change your choices!

    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rogers View Post
    It does look a bit like Mulga but if it came from just west of Ravenshoe, I'd guess Sally Wattle.
    Which 'sally wattle' you thinking, Cliff? A. melanoxylon is one of the 'sallys', and there is plenty of that around those parts in favourable spots, but the bark looks too rough to me to be Blackwood. We had some (pretty miserable) A. melanoxylon on the home farm, which is not very far away. 'Brown salwood' (A. aulacocarpa) as suggested by redmower could be a good bet, it's a pretty common species up there in suitable spots. It has a lot of different common names throughout its range....

    Arrgh! It's all too hard, Acacias can be so variable over their ranges, and the wood of many is virtually indistinguishable. Bring it over sometime, Luke, and we can probably pin it down as an Acacia, if that's what it is, and you can take your pick as to which particular species or subspecies it might be!

    Cheers,
    IW

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,882

    Default

    Yeah, just stick with Acacia, be aware that is can crack when you least expect it, the side grain is brilliant, the end grain just sucks light & oil.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,857

    Default

    Hah, ok ok. As much as I'd like to know exactly what species I guess at some point I have to just accept that it's just "A cool wood".

    I think it'll make some great chisel handles.

    Cheers, fellas.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,882

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luke Maddux View Post
    .... it'll make some great chisel handles......
    Absolutely.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    the sawdust factory, FNQ
    Posts
    1,051

    Default

    It's not aulococarpa (wrong bark), crassicarpa (too far off the coast) melanoxyn (wrong grain and colour) or mangium (too red and no enclosures).

    If it's softer my bet would be Acacia auriculiformis, off some creek bank in that deco country up along the Wild River or over towards the head of the Tate. Also every stony ridge in that country has Acacia Shirleyi - northern lancewood- on it and the bark looks spot on for that but the grain looks too open. If the seller said lancewood that's what it'd be.

    Auriculiformis is might have a faint brown sugar smell to it if it's green.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Nerang Queensland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    10,764

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John.G View Post
    ..Acacia Shirleyi - northern lancewood- on it and the bark looks spot on for that ..
    Based on TTIT's site (http://www.ttit.id.au/treepages/lancewood.htm) the Shirleyi's bark is far more stringy I thought, but you've certainly seen more than me

    Quote Originally Posted by John.G View Post
    Auriculiformis is might have a faint brown sugar smell to it if it's green.
    Acacia Auriculiformis is a real possibility now you mention it
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •