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  1. #1
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    Default Wheatbelt Timber ID

    Looking for an ID on this timber, I was told but have forgotten.
    It comes from the area around Southern Cross in the wheatbelt WA

    Rick




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  3. #2
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    Apr 2015
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    Warragul Vic
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    Default

    Looks like its from the Proteaceae family eg a Grevilea, Hakea etc and there are many. They have many common names too (beefwoods, needlewoods to name some).

    I may be able to suggest some from the Kalgoorlie area later when I look at some lists. Its definitely familiar.

  4. #3
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    Some ideas include

    Water Tree - Grevillea nematophylla. (this is what it looks like most to me)
    Beefwood (pale one) Grevillea sp.

    Other vague possibilities include.....

    a dryland Banksia species
    Emu Tree or Needlebush - Hakea fransisiana, Hakea presissii
    Persoonia - P. coriacea

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euge View Post
    Looks like its from the Proteaceae family eg a Grevilea, Hakea etc and there are many. They have many common names too (beefwoods, needlewoods to name some).

    I may be able to suggest some from the Kalgoorlie area later when I look at some lists. It definitely familiar.


    Thanks Euge Here is another photo of another piece, it has more bark and may help

    Rick

    20210120_160546 (Medium).jpg

  6. #5
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    Default

    Looks like a bit of Banksia I pulled from a bits and pieces bin at my local timber seller, maybe not the same species but very similar. It had the same sort of staggered or offset 'dashes' in the grain. Next time I'm down there I'll ask precisely what sort of banksia it is likely to have been.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by warrick View Post
    Thanks Euge Here is another photo of another piece, it has more bark and may help

    Rick

    20210120_160546 (Medium).jpg
    Hi Rick, I stand by my suggestions of Proteacea Family and likely a Grevillea or Hakea species imo.
    Maybe Grass Leaf Hakea is another possibility. Any of these names sound familiar to you?
    Lets see what others say.

    Euge

  8. #7
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    Perth WA
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    Default

    Have a look in the WA Forest Products Commission site.
    Experienced in removing the tree from the furniture

  9. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rod1949 View Post
    Have a look in the WA Forest Products Commission site.
    Thanks for that

    I had a look and the closest one is the River Banksia which isn't found in the area. I can assume that it must be a relative.

    So Euge's suggestion of the Proteaceae Family looks to be the closest I am going to get at the moment.
    I have emailed the place we stayed in Moorine Rock to see if he can remember what it was and will post if I get a positive ID

    Rick
    Annotation 2021-01-22 085946.jpg

  10. #9
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    Default

    I have had a reply from the farmer at the place we stayed and he thinks it is some type of Tea Tree or a type of melaleuca.
    After asking Mr Google it does resemble the bark of the Coastal Tea Tree (Leptospermum laevigatum) which was introduced over here.
    I have realised I have one of those trees in my yard and the bark looks similar but I have no intention to strip it to see whats underneath
    The finished board is being given away to day so I will tell her that it is wheatbelt timber
    Might make a few pens from the remainder, the grain looks good for that.

    Rick

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  11. #10
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    Its not a Melaleuca* IMO because NO melaceuca woods have the rays (what you call "grain") that are so obvious on the turned handle.
    Its a Proteacea of some sort. Bark may resemble some paperbarks but few occur this inland / dry area.

    If you can find someone in the Goldfields Timber Industry Group they will know as they have studied hundreds of Wheatbelt and Goldfields (WA dry woodland) woods (indigenous species).

    * Melaleuca are in the Myrtaceae family (same as eucalypts)

  12. #11
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    Here are link to my best guess ....a Grevilea like these, Have a look at these

    Grevillea nematophylla F.Muell. subsp. nematophylla: FloraBase: Flora of Western Australia
    Grevillea nematophylla F.Muell.: FloraBase: Flora of Western Australia

    Maybe the flowers reminded farmer of bottlebrushes flowers? (bottlebriush trees are Melaleuca or Callistemon)

    Euge

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