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Thread: am I crazy????

  1. #1
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    Default am I crazy????

    Hi All,

    I have been fascinated from infill planes. I have seen some guys who have built a few and I wish to try to make one.
    Is there anybody who has built one? When I say it, I want to say to build one from nothing, without to use any kit. Only flat metal and bolts.
    Am I crazy??
    If there is someone, please tell me troubles which has found.

    Many thanks.
    Cheers
    Gabriele

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  3. #2
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    Default

    Your asking US if YOUR crazy.


    Al :confused:

  4. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ozwinner
    Your asking US if YOUR crazy.


    Al :confused:
    I have clicked ENTER before to write something...
    Now I have edited.....
    Cheers
    Gabriele

  5. #4

    Default

    No you're not crazy. You're just thinking to hard about whether you can do it or not. JUST GET ON WITH IT.

  6. #5
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    Default Infill planes

    I am part may through making a small brass block plane (infill). The plane was from "shopnotes no 79" magazine. I was attracted to this plan because it used simple box joints and soft solder. Thats an easy way to experiment with plane making.
    The blade angle in the plan is 45 degrees. When I layed this out it was to high (for a block plane). This has now been dropped to 20 degrees and the bevel faceing the other way so that it still achieves 45 degree cutting angle.
    The blade cost and $25, the brass was about $15 (plenty left over).

    P.S The solder will probably be O.K. but I would not use the soft solder on the larger plane, as they have done in the mag.

    http://www.shopnotes.com/main/onlineextras.html
    Specializing in O positive timber stains

  7. #6
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    Default

    [QUOTE=knucklehead]....... it used simple box joints and soft solder. Thats an easy way to experiment with plane making.
    ...........P.S The solder will probably be O.K. but I would not use the soft solder on the larger plane, as they have done in the mag.
    [quote]

    Hi Knucklehead, but when you speak of box joints, do you refer at "metal double dovetails"... and more.. where/for what do you used soft solder??
    Cheers
    Gabriele

  8. #7
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    Default

    A dovetail joint requires cutting angles. A box joint (finger joint) is just straight sided knotches that mate tightly. Because of this it needs some sort of adhesive to secure them together. For timber work you would use a glue. With the brass solder does the same thing as the glue.

    The dovetail joint is a much better joint for this type of thing as it will lock together without the solder. To achieve the rigidity the joints are normally peined until very tight.

    The finger joint is easy to cut and assemble and when the infill is epoxied in the plane should be stiff enough to be useable. However the dovetails look really nice and are the traditional way of doing it.
    There are two pictures attached. The nice one is double dovetailed the other one is mine.
    Hope that helps.
    Specializing in O positive timber stains

  9. #8
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    Default

    Hi Gabrielle

    I don't think your are crazy but then I have the same aim as you, that is to build my own infill smoother.

    Below are a couple of links that I found to have a lot of useful information. You could also enter "infill plane make" in a Google search. I was really surprised by the amount of info regarding this pursuit that the search turned up.

    http://www.xmission.com/~jry/ww/tools/a13/a13.html

    http://www.xmission.com/~jry/ww/tool...etails-v2.html Jerry Schueller (the author of the 2nd link) has unfortunately passed away since this information was published.

    As a way of building my confidence with plane making, I built a shooting board plane (design based on a Stanley 51). The body was made from a piece of 100 x 50 hot rolled mild steel channel. This was flattened and squared up initially with an angle grinder then with files and finally scraping. After scraping, it was lapped flat with emery paper stuck to a piece of 10mm thick plate glass.

    Making the infill plane involves a lot of peening and hand rivetting. You need a nice heavy ball pein hammer for the peining and a nice solid anvil or similar. Whilst I haven't done any dovetails yet, if you follow the advice in the above links, I don't think it would be that hard to do.

    Hope this helps

    John

  10. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by knucklehead
    A dovetail joint requires cutting angles. A box joint (finger joint) is just straight sided knotches that mate tightly. Because of this it needs some sort of adhesive to secure them together. For timber work you would use a glue. With the brass solder does the same thing as the glue.

    The dovetail joint is a much better joint for this type of thing as it will lock together without the solder. To achieve the rigidity the joints are normally peined until very tight.

    The finger joint is easy to cut and assemble and when the infill is epoxied in the plane should be stiff enough to be useable. However the dovetails look really nice and are the traditional way of doing it.
    There are two pictures attached. The nice one is double dovetailed the other one is mine.
    Hope that helps.
    Thanks a lot
    Cheers
    Gabriele

  11. #10
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    Default

    Hi<SCRIPT type=text/javascript> vbmenu_register("postmenu_152226", true); </SCRIPT> JTonks,


    I had already seen those links time ago, however thanks the same.
    It has been from there that I have matured the idea to build a plane, infill plane myself.
    My worry is to build the bolts for lever cap and adjuster. I haven't a metal lathe.
    I could utilize the drill press (when I'll purchase it), I don't know. As anvil I could use a piece of railway, again I don't know.:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:
    However is good to know there's someone with my wishes about hand tools.
    Cheers
    Gabriele

  12. #11
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    Default

    Hi Gabriele

    I also like the idea of building infill planes, particularly the Norris or Spiers smoothers or panel planes. Someday ... (sigh)

    In the meantime you could use that spare #4 of yours and perhaps do as I did - I used the cast iron base (with all internals ground out) to build my "Stanley infill smoother". See my avatar (under my name). The infill is Jarrah, the LN blade-Mathieson cap iron is thick and heavy, and the cutting angle is 55 degrees. It works exceptionally well.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  13. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen
    Hi Gabriele

    I also like the idea of building infill planes, particularly the Norris or Spiers smoothers or panel planes. Someday ... (sigh)

    In the meantime you could use that spare #4 of yours and perhaps do as I did - I used the cast iron base (with all internals ground out) to build my "Stanley infill smoother". See my avatar (under my name). The infill is Jarrah, the LN blade-Mathieson cap iron is thick and heavy, and the cutting angle is 55 degrees. It works exceptionally well.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Hi Derek,

    It is a pleasure to meet you again. I saw your item on web, I don't know where, a foreigner forum perhaps . It is a good idea, but how you have been about throat. Did it be not it too large?? And about sole plate (I think it is told in this way)?? How do you have resolved it? How many questions.
    I hope they aren't secrets.
    Cheers
    Gabriele

  14. #13
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    Default

    Hi Gabriele

    No magic. The plane is set on the standard cast iron #4 base. Most of the iron protrusions have been ground out. The infill is Jarrah, sanded to 600 grit, and finished in oil and wax. The blade is a standard LN 1/8 and it is supported with a chip breaker from an old Mathieson woody. This combination is thick, heavy and solid. The blade is set at 55 degrees. The lever cap is brass and the knob is a reproduction spare from a Stanley #112 Everything was cut and shaped by hand. The mouth is extremely fine (.002" wide).

    I have attached the only picture from my file (a poor one, unfortunately).

    Here is a link to another Stanley-based infill.

    http://www.geocities.com/PicketFence.../stinfill.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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