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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    moonbi nsw Aus
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    65
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    1,884

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    Its funny how your mind works or to have an "attitude" to practice......I have 2 Silex Sliding Bevels (had them about 50 years). One has black paint the other red on the knurled part of the stock (different colours to denote different angles). When I use them (here is the attitude part) I take extra care to not bump the angle between uses. I have always had "That attitude" when using them. It never occurred to me to "tweek" them to lock tighter after setting. My brain was well aware to make sure they weren't bumped and told my bumbling hands to be careful.

    Now that I am aware of a new "mind set" I will go and check my 2 Silexes out to see if I can make them "rock solid" when they are set.
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    3,605

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    Bought my almost pristine Stanley #18 for $25 last year. Great unit!

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    619

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    Lance,

    You bought the "Japanese" Shinwa gauge. They make another gauge that looks to be a copy of the Stanley that you could not find.
    (I know, I know, both are technically Japanese. The one you have is a Japanese style)

    This is, I believe, what most people are recommending when they offer Shinwa as an alternative:
    shinwa.jpg

    You can buy these in Oz from "The Woodworks"
    https://www.thewoodworks.com.au/shop...-shinwa-detail

    Axminster have them cheaper at about $AU35, but you pay international shipping:
    Japanese Shinwa Sliding Bevel - Bevels - Squares, Bevels & Angle Measuring - Marking, Measuring & Levels - Hand Tools | Axminster Tools & Machinery

    These are ROCK SOLID !

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Birkdale
    Age
    47
    Posts
    262

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    Lance,
    Would you mind sharing where you bought the igaging bevel from?

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    259

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    Maybe Ian W can be persuaded to make a batch of his sliding bevels. They are a joy to use.

    Regards,

    Adam

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    662

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    @cjbfisher, from Amazon. Note that you need to spend $50 to get free shipping, so just leave it in your shopping cart until you have something else to get I guess.
    https://www.amazon.com.au/gp/product...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    @Lappa, that's an outstanding deal. Congrats!

    @RossM, it was a tight context between the two Shinwa bevels when deciding what to buy. It's good to know yours works well.
    Lance

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    74
    Posts
    9,325

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    Quote Originally Posted by taz01 View Post
    Maybe Ian W can be persuaded to make a batch of his sliding bevels....
    Adam, thanks for the compliment, but my gauges are just copies of the found-under-every-rock (to quote Patrick Leach) Stanley 25. They are probably a bit easier to lock solidly because of the longish arm I put on the locking lever - you can apply more torque easier than with a knurled nut. But as with any gauge of this type, you can knock them out of set if you try!

    I posted a 'how to' a couple of years ago, for anyone wanting to have a go at rolling their own.

    There was a longish discussion on sliding bevels a year or three back (just searchd for it, but couldn't find it) and I think the jury found in favour of the type Ross linked to above. I'm having a senior moment & cannot remember atm, who patented the mechanism (one of you young fellas who still has some random-access memory will know), but once the patent ran out, it was duly copied by lots of people. A copy was sold by Silex in Aus (who weren't actually the manufacturers, it seems) and much more latterly, Chris Vesper has taken up the standard. The locking mechanism consists of a wedge which is pushed between blade & case by the screw sticking out the bottom of the stock. It's simple & very effective, and doesn't require any great precision to manufacture, but it requires a solid metal stock, so that the wedge doesn't spread the top when the wedge is forced under the blade to lock it. I have an old Silex and it's brilliant, locks as solid as anyone could ever wish and shrugs off hard knocks like a veteran front-rower. If you are hard on your bevel gauges & need something that can take a bit of rough-&-tumble, look out for one of these, they pop up quite frequently, and sometimes even at very reasonable prices.

    However, the Silex is a rather cold lump of metal that just doesn't feel friendly in my hands, so I only use it outside the shed on carpentry jobs, where robustness is the key selection criterion. In the shed, where I can be a bit more careful, I much prefer to use one of my 3 sizes of Stanley 25 knock-offs.....

    Cheers,
    IW

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    2,695

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    ..... I think the jury found in favour of the type Ross linked to above. I'm having a senior moment & cannot remember atm, who patented the mechanism (one of you young fellas who still has some random-access memory will know), but once the patent ran out, it was duly copied by lots of people. A copy was sold by Silex in Aus (who weren't actually the manufacturers, it seems) and much more latterly, Chris Vesper has taken up the standard. The locking mechanism consists of a wedge which is pushed between blade & case by the screw sticking out the bottom of the stock. It's simple & very effective, ......
    I can also remember this debate, Ian, but not where it was. Somehow I think Chris Vesper's website was involved..... including a reference to an American patent circa.1900. Do remember finding it fairly easily and then poring over it.

    Memory might work better tomorrow?????

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    662

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    I think this is the thread you two are referring too. I know because I've read about every thread on sliding bevels in the past month

    Sliding bevel
    Lance

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    1,692

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    A copy was sold by Silex in Aus (who weren't actually the manufacturers, it seems) and much more latterly, Chris Vesper has taken up the standard.
    Someone say Silex?



    Got this in a bulk lot from a deceased estate, this was one of the pieces I kept. Definitely has a heft to it like Ian mentioned and locks down really solid. Doubt I'll ever replace it.

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    619

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    The patent was Isaiah Robonson and Henry Fairbanks in 1873
    US136714A - Improvement in carpenters bevels - Google Patents

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
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    Quote Originally Posted by RossM View Post
    The patent was Isaiah Robonson and Henry Fairbanks in 1873
    US136714A - Improvement in carpenters bevels - Google Patents

    Thanks, Ross.

    Just had a look on Chris Vesper's website and he says "...This design was inspired by the Isaiah J Robinson patent of 1876..."
    https://www.vespertools.com.au/vesper-tools-history/

    I managed to find the following patents granted to Robinson for improvements to sliding bevels:
    • US104206A, 14-6-1870, Isaiah J Robinson (only),
    • US136714A, 11-3-1873, Fairbanks and Robinson (as quoted by you),
    • US Patent: RE8,058, 29-1-1878, Isaiah J Robinson.

    The latter patent apparently addressed ambiguities in the first patent, and probably extended the patent period.

    I was not able to find any reference to a patent granted in 1876 (see Vesper), but there was a Court decision in 1874 relating to "Improvement in the process of tempering the blades of squares":
    • Second Circuit Case Number 153,115 of 14-7-1874.

    United States Courts of Appeals Reports: Cases Adjudged in the United States ... - United States. Courts of Appeals, Samuel Appleton Blatchford - Google Books

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
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    Here are copies of Isaiah J Robinson's original 1870 patent for a sliding bevel and Chris Vesper's current version, 150 years later. Remarkably similar; a pedigree acknowledged by Vesper.

    Sliding Bevel - Robinson.jpg


    Sliding Bevel - Vesper.jpg

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