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  1. #1
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    Default Flea market find: Stanley 4 1/2, type 14

    Looks in pretty good knick - I donít reckon itís done too much work, and appears to my eyes to be ridgy didge. Should clean up nice, and I paid a fair price. Happy days!
    Thisíll be my first fixer upper.

    E11AE4B3-58D4-45AD-BF9F-ED69077EE8C3.jpg
    0434F926-C3E2-4044-AC04-EED435F2663D.jpg

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  3. #2
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    Wonderful - hardly used, and the rosewood looks excellent.
    Great find - congratulations
    Tom
    .... some old things are lovely
    Warm still with the life of forgotten men who made them ........................D.H. Lawrence
    https://thevillagewoodworker.blogspot.com/

  4. #3
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    It looks remarkably clean for a tool that's getting very close to being a centenarian. The woodwork is superb, just a few minor dings & a couple of obligatory paint blobs, but it looks like there isn't even a chip off the horn of the handle. It must have had careful owners in the past. I reckon just sharpen 'er up, polish the leading edge of the cap-iron & check that it's seating properly, then take it for a test-drive. If it can make 1-1.5 thou shavings repeatedly on anything you feed it, you've got a very nice keeper.....
    IW

  5. #4
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    Can confirm: it's an absolute ripper!

    It didn't need much attention at all, and I reckon it's barely seen a piece of wood. I disassembled, bathed in vinegar for a few hours, and scrubbed it down with a scotchbrite pad before oiling everything up and reassembling.

    Blade appears never to have been sharpened before. The only inconvenience is that the bevel wasn't square.
    IMG_0653.jpeg

    It didn't take too long to flatten and polish the back, then grind a new primary and secondary bevel.
    IMG_0656.jpeg

    It's taking a lovely shaving and leaving glass finish on some janky, gnarled up hardwood. Feels fantastic to in the hand. Very, very happy. I quite like the wide body too. I think I'll be putting a camber on this, and it will be my go to smoother.
    IMG_0655.jpeg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #5
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    A happy find & obviously a very happy chappy. You do stumble on the odd gem at fleamarkets, so I always sidle off & check it over if I spot a table of rust, though it sometimes irritates the other half, who is usually pursuing her own agenda..

    My luverly 07 came into my hands because I decided to check out a fleamaket on a whim, not really expecting to see anything I couldn't live without, but there it was, sitting on a table, surrounded by all sorts of junk. A quick check didn't reveal any obvious flaws & the price was irresistible so money changed hands very promptly. I had a bit more surface rust to deal with than you had, but it wasn't too bad (definitely no pitting), and it had seen plenty of use in its day, the blade was more than half worn. But a quick cleanup & a new Lee Valley blade & it was better than new!

    The only thing I've changed (apart from the new blade) in the close to 30 years I've had it is the front knob. I don't like the "high" knobs Stanley switched to in the '20s (slavishly copied by Record), I much prefer a lower, flat-topped knob like the original "low" Stanley knobs. I happened to have a piece of rosewood so I made a new knob that is much more to my liking:
    Record 07.jpg.

    I was going to say, "Another story with a happy ending", but really, the story has only begun, and I would hope you and your "new" 4.5 are about to enjoy a long & happy relationship....
    Cheers,
    IW

  7. #6
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    Nice #7, Ian. As it turns out, I'm shopping for one of those right now. I need one for flattening tops mostly. Not so easy to find though.

    The flea markets are usually pretty hit and miss. This was the only hand plane I saw that day. And it wasn't a tool guy. Just a random object among other unrelated stuff. I haven't been to one in many years, because I usually find it all a bit tedious. Too much junk. But I'm glad I went that day. Picked up a nice vintage blue resin marples 1/8 bevel edge chisel and a Titan 1 inch firmer chisel for a few bucks too.

  8. #7
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    Yeah, my experiences of flea markets are similar, but if you are wandering around behind your significant other & bored witless, a tableful of rust can be a magnet, & occasionally, once or twice in a lifetime maybe, you strike gold.....

    Just don't tell us the guy wanted $10 for it & you beat him down to 5.....
    Cheers,
    IW

  9. #8
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    That 4-1/2 has come up a treat, and what a joy to find it in such outstanding condition.

    For about a decade we would visit the Sunday markets for the fresh produce. There was always the "tool man" who had been selling from his stall since he found Noah's original hammer.
    Over the years I picked up a couple of very nice planes from him. His prices were always fair and usually below online market values of the time.
    Interestingly I found two of my favourite planes this way - both type 18's from post WW2
    A number 4 and a 3C

    IMG_20220125_110327.jpg
    The No 4 now has an E A Berg Blade, while the 3C carries one by Ron Hock

    IMG_20220125_110454.jpg
    .... some old things are lovely
    Warm still with the life of forgotten men who made them ........................D.H. Lawrence
    https://thevillagewoodworker.blogspot.com/

  10. #9
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    Default a question on presentation

    This may be a question far too often asked, but on a USER tool like these (not some display artefact), why isn't it completely restored with a good all-sides flattening, polishing and buffing? (of everything).

    Make everything gleam and shine?

    I get "patina"... but these aren't bought for the museum shelf, they are bought to be used.

    So why not bring them up to 100%?

  11. #10
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    That's a lovely 4 1/2 . Real nice plane to use in that condition . Materials and quality of build is top notch and in some cases un repeatable these days . EG the Brazilion Rosewood. Good score!

    You would find it to be a bit of searching to put together a complete set in that condition . You may be lucky with the higher numbers like a 7 though because they tend to stay on the shelf or in the box longer between uses . Compared to a 3 a 4 or 4 1/2 .
    Not that it matters too much . The worst thing about more heavily used older Stanley's is the worn brass adjuster knob taking a lot more turns to engage and move the blade.
    I have a favorite no 4 that was Dads and I gave it a go tapping it like a wood wedged plane with my brass hammer to adjust the blade back and forwards . It worked well . Strike buttons upgrade on an old Stanley will be next .

    One great place in Melbourne to let go of some cash was the HTPAA Tool sales . Lots of planes on the same day to see at good prices . Covid has closed the sales down for now I think . 3 times a year they were on .

    Hand Tool Preservation Association of Australia Inc. - Home

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    This may be a question far too often asked, but on a USER tool like these (not some display artefact), why isn't it completely restored with a good all-sides flattening, polishing and buffing? (of everything).

    Make everything gleam and shine?

    I get "patina"... but these aren't bought for the museum shelf, they are bought to be used.

    So why not bring them up to 100%?
    I think you answered your own question

    They are to be used. Depends on what your time is worth.
    Making everything gleam and shine can take hours. I'd prefer to spend this time to use them.

    Maybe when I retire and have more time?
    I am a fan of gleaming tools don't get me wrong.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumbthumper View Post
    I think you answered your own question

    They are to be used. Depends on what your time is worth.
    Making everything gleam and shine can take hours. I'd prefer to spend this time to use them.

    Maybe when I retire and have more time?
    I am a fan of gleaming tools don't get me wrong.
    Yep - and around these parts our humidity means that an application of wax or oil is needed to stop rust. This attracts dirt and hand prints - often known as patina .
    It's a never ending battle to keep tools clean
    Tom
    .... some old things are lovely
    Warm still with the life of forgotten men who made them ........................D.H. Lawrence
    https://thevillagewoodworker.blogspot.com/

  14. #13
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    Well, WP, if you ever find a truly 'collectible' plane I would advise you not to touch it! Collectors are a prissy lot & get all thingy about "restorations", so if you want to maximise resale value, just pass it on to the highest bidder as-found & keep your mitts off it other than to (carefully) package it up for mailing....

    You can polish up your "users" to your heart's content & it won't make much difference to their resale value, but may warm your heart. Me, I'm in Rob's camp for a user - knock off any surface rust, fix anything that needs fixing, then use as directed! All of my cast-iron planes have a light "patina" of oxide. As Tom says, you would go bonkers trying to keep them gleaming unless you live in the Simpson desert. But the soles are all shiny from use & the woodwork gleams from constant rubbing with palm-oil (i.e. oil from the palm of my hands! ). They have a look about them that clearly says "I'm well-loved but well-used".

    When I made my first brass & steel infill (the one on my avatar) I fussed over it & carefully wiped any finger marks off before retiring it for the night, but that wore off by 6 months or less & since then it has been left to look like whatever it will look like as time passes. It still works just the same as when it was shiny......
    Cheers,
    Ian
    IW

  15. #14
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    Looks like I owe an apology

    I would have thought a $20 market find hardy ranked amongst an archaeological treasure

    Next time I get one, I promise not to grind it with the oscillating belt sander and bicarb soda blaster .... and sell it here


    (edit - I DO love a good market find. They are almost hens teeth here in Oz)

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post

    Just don't tell us the guy wanted $10 for it & you beat him down to 5.....
    Cheers,
    It wasn't $10, but it was certainly lower than than the typical prices that are fetched for less desirable version in poorer condition than this one. I paid the full ask - but while I was looking over it, the seller knocked a fiver off the price. Good man!

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