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  1. #31
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    ...Then I took the thinnest saw I had and cut it in half. A piece of tent rod serves as the metal collar which just fit over the knob at the end of the handle rod. I then glued it back together over the rod, sanded and finished. To make sure I did not glue it to the rod I applied a generous amount of wax to the metal handle and rotated the handle during drying a few times...
    I had to do a similar thing to put a handle on my Dawn blacksmiths post drill.

    However I split the timber first, then glued it back together with a piece of paper in the joint (I'd read about that somewhere). I then turned up the handle on my lathe. The two halves were easy to split along the paper joint. The advantage of that method is that you only loose the thickness of the paper, not the width of your saw kerf, when gluing the handle around the shaft.

    Pdawn2.jpg Pdawn1.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    ...Worked out well I think. Not as perfect as on a lathe, but pretty impressed how close you can get just by eye and hand tools. The shape is not like the original. I just went with what feels good in my hand...
    I think your finish is better than what I achieved. I now have a better lathe (but probably not better turning skills ).

    Nice work. It looks good.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Thanks. I will try the paper approach next time. It makes sense. I have a similar problem on another tool.

    Good advise. Appreciate it.

    Like your handle too. Looks good.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  3. #33
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    Default A Bit of a Tangent.

    It doesn't help with your restoration, but I thought this might add a bit of interest.
    I've seen Ixion bench drills for sale from time to time. Never bought one. However this variation was listed not long ago - an Ixion post drill . Without close examination, I think it's the same body and mechanism as the bench drills but with a different support system.

    Anyways, enjoy.

    Ixion1.jpg

    Ixion2.jpg Ixion3.jpg

    I fairly sure there were a couple of Ixion (or the similar 'Union") threads on the UKworkshop forum several years ago.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  4. #34
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Yep it looks the same. More so to Arfur's as it has the wingnut for the crank handle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...an Ixion post drill . ...


    Interesting. Mine did not come with a base. I was first thinking to also turn it into a post mount, but could not agree with myself where it would go. So I stayed with making a simple bench base. Also I thought that they would not have made these as post drills and I did not want to wonder off too much. And now you show me one just like it Funny how things turn.

    Cheers

  5. #35
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Hi, took a while until I could post again. But here it comes. This is going to be a longer post, so hopefully you have your popcorn ready.

    I finished all the parts and put it back together to make it work again.

    First reworked the chuck as good as I could and got new springs. The inside of the chuck is very pitted. I tried to smoothen it as good as possible, but the jaws do not glide as easy as they should and the springs I think are a bit weak. But it is now at least workable to some extend.

    20191030_075359.jpg20191030_195006.jpg20191031_120419.jpg20191031_120424.jpg


    Then I started to install the flywheel assembley.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arfur View Post
    Sorry Gents, I have been off line for a few days. re the attached image.

    1 The bottom half of the lower flywheel bearing is held in place with a grub screw, presumably on an extension of the flywheel.
    Yes Arfur is right the top assembly has two ball bearings. One inside the housing and one outside. Both bearings are open. I had to take good care during disassembly not to loose any beads. And now also to make sure not to loose any during assembly.
    For that I first placed all the beads in the bearing for the top and carefully put it over the top shaft. Then used electrical tape to keep it together and protected. I put the shaft into the housing and turned it upside down on the drill pole with a block of wood underneath.

    20191030_055833.jpg20191030_060032.jpg20191031_121614.jpg

    After that I put the rings of the inside bearing onto the shaft inside and carefully added the beads. Tightened down the ring with the thread and secured with the 2 grubscrews. I tightened it until I felt there is nearly no play, but free rotation.

    20191031_122437.jpg

    Then put the drive shaft in and threaded it into the flywheel shaft. Not before I put the drill gear in with the key and turned the drill upright again.

    20191031_122607.jpg

    Now the drill shaft is secured in the flywheel shaft with a spring and collar secured by a pin. I assume the purpose of the spring is to soften the end when the rotating flywheel retracts the drill at the end of the job and also to ensure the shaft is not tightened in the thread and will freely move down again. Also it makes sure that the shaft does not fall out the bottom if the drill never hits a workpiece before it bottoms out.

    20191031_122849.jpg20191031_123011.jpg20191031_123218.jpg

    When the drill shaft is threaded all the way into the flywheel shaft the spring can be put over and the top collar with pin fixed onto it. Closed off with the cap and the flywheel can be simply put on top. That one just sits there with a friction fit on a conical shape.
    Then I went onto installing all the inside gears with new dowelpins. And boy does it now look like day and night to how it was when I first opened it. Have a look. I attached the first picture again.

    20191031_124612.jpg20190926_090739.jpg

    Finally added the chuck and grease reservoir for the flywheel.
    For the friction pad I for now just put the bolts spring and brass pad in. Ian was so helpful to get the bolt drilled and made a new pad.

    20191025_195614.jpg

    I decided to put it into working order and make a proper handle for the pressure adjustment later using the drill itself for that. I felt that will give it the chance to prove its working capability to me 😉

    And voila here it is together with his little handheld brother. I am pretty happy with it and next post I will show the results / experiences of working with it.

    20191031_135659.jpg20191031_124908.jpg20191031_124918.jpg

  6. #36
    Join Date
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    Well done, Ck - I'm amazed the old thing came up so well! I think I would've just given it up for dead when I saw the case opened, and all that rust - looked like a metastatic cancer. But you've shown how perseverance & elbow grease can work wonders.....

    Cheers,
    IW

  7. #37
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    May 2019
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    Hi,

    thanks Ian. It did take some work and in between I wasn't sure if it will work. But I did not want to give up. I want to thank all of your help and interest. That was really good.

    And it does work quite well. I used to have a cheap Aldi drill press, which I threw out a year ago as it was annoying me too much. This drill works much much better. I like the adjustable constant down pressure. At the cheap electrical drill press I always had to be careful in how much pressure I put on for the belt not to slip. I could never got it to work. I know that was a cheap one and a silly investment, but many on a low budget probably go for that. I prefer this one over the Aldi now any time.

    Here are some pictures of the work I put it through. The pictures drilling the aluminium disc are for the knob on the friction pad which I am still working on. In the ability to drill I have no complaints, although some observations and issues at the end of the post.

    20191102_072608.jpg20191102_085234.jpg20191102_094508.jpg20191102_203006.jpg



    Quote Originally Posted by Arfur View Post
    ...The drill is quite clever. The knob below the flywheel is used to apply friction to the shaft so it probably has a soft pad at the end of it. The grease cup opposite is to keep it lubricated.
    In use the crank is turned in reverse and the flywheel doesn't move until the chuck is fully retracted. With a bit installed cranking forward will cause the chuck to move down till it meets the job and at that point the flywheel will start to spin. The pressure on the bit is controlled by the amount of friction on the flywheel shaft so it spins while the drill is cutting.
    When you stop cranking the flywheel will continue to spin and lift the chuck, you can reverse crank to assist if necessary...
    Yep this is how it works. I thought it'd be nice to show it on a video:



    You can see the stages which Arfur described. But you also see some issues:

    1. I tried to have the pole as straight and vertical as possible. However when the drill hits the workpiece you will observe some flexing which brings the drill out of true. The harder the workpiece or the resistance the worse it is. I guess the main reason here is that I used plywood for the base it is just not stiff and hard enough. I tried to put some shims in, but they do not do much. For now it is ok for me, but If i come across a suitable cast base I will probably get one.

    2. The chuck works, but is not great. The jaws do not move freely and sometimes are sticking out differently far, which puts the drill bit out of center. I have the following choices with that:
    a) I just live with it. Maybe try to find some stronger springs

    b) I get the inside of the chuck milled over to make the surface as smooth as possible. It is still quite pitted

    c) I get an adapter piece made form 3/4"x20UNEF to 1/2"x20UNF. The thread of the drill shaft is 3/4"x20UNEF and most common replacement chucks nowadays have a 1/2"x20UNF mount. Then I can just put this chuck to the side and use a new one, but still keep everything original

    d) Most extreme solution is to get the drill shaft reworked on a lathe to replace the current 3/4" thread with a 1/2"x20UNF thread. However that would be then permanent and no way back to put the original chuck on at later stage


    However, before I make a decisions on that I will finish the pressure control knob and play with it more.

    However, any suggestions are more than welcome.

  8. #38
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    Thanks for that video. I've heard the mechanism described before, but never understood. Now it is clear. What a great mechanism. What a great drill press.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Africa
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    Well done, you can really be proud of what you’ve achieved there.

    On the chuck, it might be possible to get a chuck drilled out to 3/4 and tapped out. It’s quite possible that you could find a chuck with enough meat on that part, and a useable Chinese chuck is quite cheap - cheap enough that if it goes wrong you won’t be too upset to just bin it. I have a cheap and nasty drill press which had no chuck, and the entire chuck cost half what I paid for the adapter to get it on the shaft - the chuck was Chinese and the adapter was made locally.

  10. #40
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Thanks for that. I like that option. Did not think of that, but makes sense.

    Got to find someone who has a 3/4"x20 UNEF tap though. Or need to see if I can find one for acceptable price. Would probably use it only once ;-)

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  11. #41
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    Oct 2009
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    South Africa
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    True. Thats going to cost a bit, being an unusual thread, and quite large to boot. And youd probably need a set of three to bottom the thread out too, you wont want to drill any deeper than absolutely necessary.

  12. #42
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    Final touch. Finished also the pressure control knob. A bit chunkier than the original.

    Made from aluminium. Drilled the holes with this bench drill (see post above) and then filed into shape. To cut the thread to receive the bolt I used another bolt and turned it into a poor man's tap. Works ok in aluminium.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  13. #43
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    I reckon you should name this your "Lazarus drill", Ck - it's a miraculous return to life!

    The new knob doesn't look too much out of proportion (in the pic, anyway) - it will be a lot easier on your hands when they get old & arthritic....

    All that remains is to get a solid base made up, but with the ingenuity you've shown so far, I don't think it'll be too long before we see something appear....

    Cheers,
    IW

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