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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    44

    Default Ixion Bench Drill - Restoration

    Here is a new project of mine. I have picked up this hand cranked bench drill made by Ixion, Germany. I liked it and thought would be great to bring it back to being useful.


    20190926_083909[1].jpg



    Unfortunately I have not found much about it on the net. When opening it up I was hoping that the grease inside would have preserved it better, but that was not the case.


    20190926_090733[1].jpg

    and it took me 3 days to take it apart to where I am today.

    20190930_174136[1].jpg

    Still trying to get the support pole off and the part which supports the flywheel also seems to come further apart. There is a spring and some washers inside so I think it might be able to come apart to get to the inside, but not sure.


    A few odd thing about this, which make me certain that the one who violated and abused it before did not really know what he was doing or had even less info as me and forgot how it got back together.


    First the chuck is in really bad condition and I am not sure if I can reuse it again. It is weird that not only that the springs inside are missing, but that 5 chuck jaws came out, where I am certain only 3 should be.

    20190928_165130[1].jpg

    Only 3 of them had the holes for the springs and that 3 already make a perfect cone together. I do not know how the other 2 pieces would fit in. Or can anyone explain that to me?


    Further, I think the cog on the main shaft was sitting not on the right position I believe. I only found one picture of very similar drill on the net and it shows the cog at the bottom of the shaft and not the middle. And in this case the shear pin was missing, which led to the groove in the cog and the shaft was misaligned and it took me quite some force to get it out. (the picture on the right is the one from the net - Woodlooking: Hand cranked drill press)


    20190930_162421[1].jpgDSC02170.JPG

    That blog entry is also the only info I found on how that entire thing is working. The shear pin which couple the cog to the center shaft is missing. I have to make a new one. I know that sometimes they are purposefully made of a softer metal, so I am thinking of making a brass one.



    Sadly I had to further violate some parts. But now I have it apart I can fix the damages again I believe and get it back together.


    However I was wondering if anyone has exactly an Ixion bench drill and could post a picture of the inside to see if I am right. Otherwise it'll be trial and error by myself

    A few minor parts are missing and the base. Luckily it is German made so all threads are metric, which makes it easier to find or come up with replacements and as for the base I am thinking of making one of hardwood.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    blue mountains
    Posts
    4,029

    Default

    Should be an interesting project. Sorry I cant help as I have never seen one before but it looks like a well built tool and its always good to see old tools get another go at being useful.
    Regards
    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    44

    Default

    Hi,

    finally some progress. It took me for ever to get the pole from the main casing. I heated it up and quenched it. Oiled it and tried all sorts of things.

    I even build my own hydraulic press to try to push it out the short way. I got a pipe which just slipped over the pole and build a rig around it so I could place a bottle jack underneath and apply pressure on the other end of the pole while the casing is held back by the pipe.


    20191004_170931[1].jpg

    However it just did not want to move. Then I finally thought if it does not want to come out that way, then maybe the other longer way. So I sanded of the rest of the pole and made it nice and smooth and oiled it. Held the pipe upright in my vice and place the casing with pole up side down onto it. And then I abused it with a hammer and finally it moved millimeter by millimeter.

    20191005_100922[1].jpg20191005_101024[1].jpg20191005_101243[1].jpg

    Took me about good 10 minutes to drive it out and finally it fell through into the pipe. I had by then mushroomed the lower end so far that it would not fall all the way through. But then sanding off the upper end allowed me to pull it out completely. Well I will then have to file the bottom part back into shape. Not too bad as this will anyway be hidden in the base I'll have to make. At least now everything is taken apart and I can go clean and repaint everything.

    20191005_101616[1].jpg20191005_102324[1].jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
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    Default

    Got around giving the parts a new lick of paint.

    Next I will start making a new base. I am thinking of making it from hardwood I have lying around.

    I had a look if I cam find somewhere a cast iron one which might fit, but no luck.

    Unless maybe someone here might have one which can be used? The column is 40mm in diameter. Preferably Brisbane area.



    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Hi,
    I have what looks like the same model drill press in working order. I will open it up later in the week and see if I can get you an idea of its construction
    I still use it, the adjustable and constant pressure make it ideal for small diameter drills in steel.IMG_5912.jpgIMG_5908.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    44

    Default

    Awesome. That would be appreciated.
    If possible could you also undo the pressure control know under the flywheel? At least that's what it is I think. Mine is missing. An M10 bolt fits in mine but I am not sure how the surface looks like which engages with the shaft of the flywheel. Is it just flat or is there even something in between?

    Thanks and looking forward.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Lots of grease but I hope it fills in some of the blanks

    The drill is quite clever. The knob below the flywheel is used to apply friction to the shaft so it probably has a soft pad at the end of it. The grease cup opposite is to keep it lubricated.
    In use the crank is turned in reverse and the flywheel doesn't move until the chuck is fully retracted. With a bit installed cranking forward will cause the chuck to move down till it meets the job and at that point the flywheel will start to spin. The pressure on the bit is controlled by the amount of friction on the flywheel shaft so it spins while the drill is cutting.
    When you stop cranking the flywheel will continue to spin and lift the chuck, you can reverse crank to assist if necessary.
    Hope that helps, let me know if you need anything else
    RegardsIxion 2.jpgIxion 1.jpg

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    moonbi nsw Aus
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    65
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    1,859

    Default

    Cklett. Can I suggest you get yourself a brass rod say 20mm diameter and 150-250 long to use as a drift to knock out pieces. The amount of force needed to disassemble parts can be brutal and on top of that you can damage areas that need to go back together.

    I had a major problem with an old electric motor driving my thicknesser. I had to get right inside to insulate wires that had lost the old fashioned and brittle insulation on the wires. All I had to disassemble was a big hammer. I was expecting the cast iron case that held the bearings to shatter during the "abuse". That experience prompted me to make a hydraulic press using a 20 tonne bottle jack. I had the steel so it was reasonably cheap to make. Boy it makes so much difference to press things on and off rather than being brutal with parts
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Default

    Hi, thanks a lot for the good feedback.

    The pictures confirm for me that the cog on the main shaft was indeed in the wrong position. Thanks for going through the trouble of opening it up for me.

    Today I have cleaned up the groove in the main shaft as good as I could and fitted a new key. Testfit in the housing and with the small cog proofed that everything is now moving freely here.



    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Boringgeoff is offline Try not to be late, but never be early.
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Default

    The friction control on your drill is quite interesting. In 1896 Walter Fifield was awarded a US patent (US 555,442) for a chain drill which uses a friction device to control the amount of drive given to the drill bit in operation. I have two chaindrills utilising this, one, by Fifield Bros, has what appears to be a leather plug to give the friction while the other, by Smith & Hemenway, has a spring loaded brass plug as per Fifields patent.
    Without having ever seen an Ixion drill to compare it both the drill and the chain drill drive control appear very similar design.
    Cheers,
    Geoff.
    https://patentimages.storage.googlea...6/US555442.pdf
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Default

    Wow, after Arfur's post I was thinking to use a M10 Bolt and a short 10mm piece of brass as friction pad to make a new friction knob. But now I am wondering if there should also be a spring. It sort of makes sense as I can imagine that the friction force is then increased slightly with a turn using a spring. Where as just having the bolt even with a soft pad (brass or should I use something else?) once made contact with the shaft it will fix it quite quickly.

    Maybe Arfur can comment if there is something else in there or just the threaded part?

    It's really great to get this feedback. I cannot find anything else on the web about this drill unfortunately.

    Cheers

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Sydney
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    Default

    The friction pad is brass and is mounted on a spring which is recessed into the end of the adjustment shaft. It looks like the brass has been turned down so the back end fits inside the spring. When assembled the pad/spring protrudes about 10mm and as you can see it is a fairly heavy spring.

    IMG_5918.jpg

  13. #13
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    Awesome, thanks a lot. I will come up with a solution.

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    Awesome, thanks a lot. I will come up with a solution...
    Ck, It looks like you still have the knob, so all you need is the spring & brass pad. That little brass nubbin would take about a minute to turn on my lathe, so I'd b happy to make one for you. Springs can be found & scrounged in every imaginable size & gauge (though not always the size you really want, of course...).

    Cheers,
    IW

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2019
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    Default

    Ian, I might take you up in your offer. I will PM you about it. Thanks.

    But actually I do not have any of it. All I have is a 1/2" bolt which fits perfectly and I found a spring which might work.

    I would have to shorten the spring.

    The spring outer diameter is just under 8mm and the bolt core is just over 10mm. If I can manage to drill a hole into the bolt I might be able to replicate the original set up. I would hope there is then enough meat left on the bolt for it not to break. Means I have to get hole perfectly centered.

    I also still have a piece of round brass bar. 20mm dia.



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