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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbr View Post
    Thanks all.
    Ian, if you happen to have a spare tote (didn't know it was called that) and knob, I will gladly pay postage and then some - I'll PM you. ... .
    A great outcome! So generous, Ian.

    Your challenge now scott will be to make sure the metal bits are adequately restored to match Ian's tote and knob. That is a challenge!

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  3. #17
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    Woodworkers tend to be generous people.
    I spent two solid days last year restoring all the metal bits on my planes starting from the soles up. It was dirty and tiring, but worth it. Some would have been my grandfathers (via my uncle).
    That Bailey # 5 is worthy of Ian's tote and knob.

  4. #18
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    Thereís a router bit around for making plane handles.
    Not sure if they are available here in Oz.
    I brought one back from Canada last trip for a mate.
    H.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by clear out View Post
    Thereís a router bit around for making plane handles.....
    Nah, rasps are much quieter & much safer for my fingers!

    OK Scott - I have a tote & knob for you. I thought I had a couple of factory beech handles but they must have found a home already. I have several beech knobs but no totes - I guess totes suffer the most damage & are the bits in demand. So how about a she-oak set?
    She_oak tote.jpg

    She-oak has a much nicer feel than beech anyway - it's as good as rosewood imo, but maybe a bit more fancy with its 'oak' grain.

    So PM me if that's satisfactory (with an address to send them to) & I'll try & get them away to you tomorrow, if not, then Monday for sure..
    Cheers,
    Ian
    IW

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chief Tiff View Post
    Sorry Ian; the 4-1/2 definitely uses two fasteners, same as the 5, 5-1/2, 6,7 & 8.

    The 5-1/4 on the other hand shares the same tote as the 3 and 4.
    Hmm I knew as soon as I made that bold statement that I'd be wrong! I did have a 4 1/2 briefly, about 30 plus years back, & I guess my memory just let me down (again!).

    Thanks for promptly correcting the record....
    Ian
    IW

  7. #21
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    Looks fabulous, Ian.
    I have messaged my address.
    And I will pay forward your kindness.
    Scott

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Delightful work, Ian. And beside the aesthetics, the grain orientation is brilliant - no short grain anywhere, even on the horn.

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    ...... - no short grain anywhere, even on the horn.
    A bit of a "trick of the light", Graeme, it's actually got short grain along most of the grip as per usual, but the way the piece is cut from the log makes the medullary rays fan out (if viewed from front or back) which is giving a false impression of its orientation. It does look as if the grain flows along the contours of the tote, I'll admit. I wish I could say "that's just how I planned it", but it would be a fib, it's just how it turned out.

    She-oaks are not big trees and I sawed the tree this bit came from on my brother's Lucas mill so the planks were 150mm wide at best and with the taper of the logs it often means they contain a lot of sapwood. The sapwood of she-oak is very prone to splitting so I try to avoid including it as much as possible, but on a narrow plank the choices sometimes get a bit limited.

    Someone asked about grain orientation in totes a while back (was it woodpixel??) and I had a bit of a ramble about it at the time. All the factory-made totes I've ever seen orient the grain so it runs "horizontally" through the grip. This might seem counter-intuitive, 'cos that's where the force is applied in use, so why not arrange it so the grain runs along the grip part? I think the obvious answer to that is that it would make the horn all short-grain which would make it impractically fragile. There are plenty of busted horns in the world as it is, but having 'long-grain' running along the horn gives it a fighting chance that it wouldn't get if it were all short-grain...

    The short-grain grip problem is alleviated to some extent by the mounting stud - keeping that tight prestresses the wood & gives it a better chance of withstanding sudden shock (like trips to the floor). I've twice in my woodworking life knocked a plane off the bench, once with no visible damage, the other resulted in a snapped-off horn. The grip section remained sound though & I reckon that was mostly because I am a bit fussy about keeping the stud nice & tight. I've seen a lot of totes broken right in the middle of the grip, though & I'm sure this can only happen (or is far more likely to happen) if the stud is loose & it gets a sharp knock.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    IW

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    A bit of a "trick of the light", Graeme, it's actually got short grain along most of the grip as per usual, but the way the piece is cut from the log makes the medullary rays fan out (if viewed from front or back) which is giving a false impression of its orientation. It does look as if the grain flows along the contours of the tote, I'll admit. I wish I could say "that's just how I planned it", but it would be a fib, it's just how it turned out. ...

    Sometimes I think that you are too honest and too self effacing, Ian.

    Perhaps I should have said "not too short" a grain. I thought the complex grain at the top of the tote may have been from a branch or fork in the tree.

    And I still think that you planned it very well!

  11. #25
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    That Ian,blokes a good Egg I reckon.

    Cheers Matt

  12. #26
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    Oh Ian, it's perfect. Just arrived. I didn't realise till later in this thread that you made it. The grain is fantastic.
    It fits perfectly.
    I trust you got that transfer?
    Many thanks and I'll pay the kindness forward here.
    Scott

  13. #27
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    All good Scott. Yep I checked my bank & it's there ok - you were quite over-generous, I really only wanted to cover postage!

    As I said, the She-oak should be good for a few generations of use as long as it's not dropped or left out in the rain.....

    Cheers
    IW

  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    As I said, the She-oak should be good for a few generations of use as long as it's not dropped or left out in the rain.....
    Or used as an anvil

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by clear out View Post
    If your in Sinny the TTTG are holding their annual tool sale at Thornleigh on Feb 20th.
    Bob el pressidento makes handles.
    H.
    Sorry to dredge up this old thread with an off-topic question, but can anyone tell me if the TTTG tool sale is a 'cash only' sale?
    I'm after some plane parts and hoping to pick them up from the sale.

    Thanks in advance!

  16. #30
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    Default The Traditional Tools Group February sale at Thornleigh Brickpit

    Pretty well all the sellers would be cash only.
    Jim Davey takes cards but not sure if he sells old parts, heís selling the Chinese planes now.
    I still have a few bits and bobs but wonít be selling at the sale, 30 + years of organising and early starts are enough for me.
    What are you after? I may be able to help.
    H.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

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