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  1. #46
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  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post




    A thread like that would be very welcome Paul. The only issue I have with not using chemicals (like vinegar) is how to extract the rust from the pits, which are below the surface. So that's question number one for your new thread.
    Lance

    Apologies for not replying. It was deliberate, but only because I thought I would start a new thread and tackle the issue there. However, as usual I have over estimated my ability to complete tasks. Consequently, I have only dug out one potential restoration out of the two I had planned so I thought I should make some quick comment here.

    The aspect of pitting is something I have been concerned about from time to time. However, in practice it does not seem to present an issue. If the pitting is red rust I think something has to be done with it: The pitts may need to be stabilised with a proprietary solution. this could be applied with something such as a cotton bud for isolated large spots. However, if the pitting is black, there may be no further action necessary. I am not sure what the black staining is, but it may be a magnetite layer. If that is the case it will be passive. My observations are that nothing much changes with black staining other than a certain degree of aesthetic loss. I have a particular saw in mind and will post a pic tomorrow that demonstrates this.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  3. #48
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    Mar 2008
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    Hobart, Tas
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    Not a problem Paul. I'm not worried about the pitting on the blade, moreso just curious how you would remove the rust without a chemical treatment.

    Kind regards,
    Lance (who is currently in the ER waiting on hearing if I have a broken ankle or not. I'm rooting for not!)

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post
    Lance (who is currently in the ER waiting on hearing if I have a broken ankle or not. I'm rooting for not!)
    Hard call. Severely sprained ankles take longer to recover from! DAMHIKT!!!!!!

  5. #50
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by markharrison View Post
    Hard call. Severely sprained ankles take longer to recover from! DAMHIKT!!!!!!
    It turned out to be a bad sprain. Phew! I broke my other foot about five years ago, and it was a 9 month recovery with permanent consequences. It is a relief, as there was a sickening crunching sound when I went down, so donít know what that was.

    The worst part is that today is workshop day, with a selection of fun jobs lined up. But will instead spend it lying down with my foot up in the air.

  6. #51
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    Lance

    Sorry to hear of your injury. I see a day of reflection and planning ahead.

    Regards
    Paul

    Ps: Sustained an injury myself on Tuesday when feeding a four meter cypress pine board through the thicknesser. Boards this length have to start outside the shed through a doorway (significant point).The board jammed at the start. Instead of tapping the end with a mallet as I normally do I put my full weight behind the board and it snapped about 600mm from the back end (there was probably a large knot I had not twigged was there)! I was catapulted forward onto the long part of the board grazing my chin and then pitched into the door jamb smashing the back of my head.

    Blood everywhere as a little bit goes a long way. I looked like a standin for a Bruce Willis scene. No down time or rest days following a medicinal alcoholic beverage to dull the discomfort .
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  7. #52
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    May 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post
    IThe worst part is that today is workshop day, with a selection of fun jobs lined up. But will instead spend it lying down with my foot up in the air.
    You have my sympathies Lance.

    I got an infection in my leg which started nearly six weeks ago. Plenty of projects lined up but I can't do much in the shed.

    I spent three days in hospital and then continued under Hospital in the Home twice daily visits for IV antibiotics and dressing changes for another two weeks. FOr the last three weeks I have been on oral antibiotics and a visiting nurse every second day for dressing changes. At least I am getting a bit more mobile again now and can drive the ute again.

    I hope your recovery is faster than mine.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
    See here for details:
    https://www.woodworkforums.com/f303/...-2019-a-224305

  8. #53
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    This is for the Chief (by special request).

    This is the chin which after four days is starting to heal

    P1050781 (Medium).JPG

    Geez, that's one ugly chin. I've never noticed before

    And the back of the head, which is not really any more attractive:

    P1050793 (Medium).JPG

    I can't tell you whether that is improving any as I have not seen it before.

    Sorry there is no blood and gore as that got washed off on Tuesday and I was reluctant to set up a re-enactment.

    I doubt that either of these little injuries are as uncomfortable as those of Lance and Doug: Just a little more visible.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post
    Not a problem Paul. I'm not worried about the pitting on the blade, moreso just curious how you would remove the rust without a chemical treatment.

    Kind regards,
    Lance (who is currently in the ER waiting on hearing if I have a broken ankle or not. I'm rooting for not!)
    Lance

    I hope the ankle is feeling a little better after your day of reflection.

    This is the saw I mentioned before:

    P1050771 (Medium).JPGP1050773 (Medium).JPG

    It is a good deep saw, close to original width and sports a really nice handle. It suffers from two issues. Firstly it has two broken teeth, which could be rectified one day, and secondly it has staining which on closer inspection is in fact pitting. The pitting is black but seems stable. There is little that could be done with it and it is what it is.

    P1050772 (Medium).JPGP1050776 (Medium).JPG

    Most times I coat the saw plate with wax (and polish it to prevent surface rust) and no doubt this assists in preventing further degradation of the pitting too.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  10. #55
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    I've often thought about pitting and the ability to rectify it.

    Is there a metal, or process, that can be used to fill them?

    On old cars we used lead wiping, but those days are now over.

    (edit) I'm aware of some metal fibre fillers that are like bondo, but these are for car wheels and painted over. I was thinking of unpainted surfaces like saws and planes.

    (edit 2) Ha! Gunsmiths use Durafil. Nice!

  11. #56
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    I think in general there is no practical application for filling pits with anything. On a user saw any fill would almost certainly fall out in a short period of time as there is just not enough depth to give a reasonable key and also far too much flex. In a collector saw the very fact it is being repaired in such a fashion means it is not a collector saw unless it is in excess of 150 years old (a fairly arbitrary time here before anybody gets too picky) and will stand out like the proverbials whatever condition it is in. So again you would not bother.

    One other exception I have considered is where some clown had drilled a "hang" hole in the toe.

    P1050794 (Medium).JPG

    Could this be repaired with a "steel bog" such as Devcon?

    Devcon.jpg

    Not really. It may have similar properties as steel but it certainly looks different and the above comments relating to flex are still applicable.

    So why would I even bother with a saw exhibiting the dreaded "hang hole?" Well it is a revered saw and I have another project in mind for this one where I will "wear" the hang hole. It will be something of a hybrid anyway, but that will have to wait for another thread.

    P1050797 (Medium).JPG

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  12. #57
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    Default Plating Kits - make it shine!

    Not too sure this is adding to the thread, but I thought to show what I found.

    These guys sell a range of plating kits - nickel, copper, chrome, silver, gold, etc - ELECTROPLATING KITS & ELECTROLESS PLATING KITS | Caswell Australia

    It occurred to me that the forum members would be interested in such a thing, primarily as one can do sexy restorations of buttons, knobs, screws, bolts, etc.

    I'm certainly considering it!

    Before anyone pitches a fit at the prices, there are also smaller kits that simply plug into the wall.

    Edit - powder coating kits Powder Coating System | Caswell Australia

  13. #58
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    Nov 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Not too sure this is adding to the thread, but I thought to show what I found.

    These guys sell a range of plating kits - nickel, copper, chrome, silver, gold, etc - ELECTROPLATING KITS & ELECTROLESS PLATING KITS | Caswell Australia

    It occurred to me that the forum members would be interested in such a thing, primarily as one can do sexy restorations of buttons, knobs, screws, bolts, etc.

    I'm certainly considering it!

    Before anyone pitches a fit at the prices, there are also smaller kits that simply plug into the wall.

    Edit - powder coating kits Powder Coating System | Caswell Australia
    Itís certainly welcomed here, nice to have a distraction from all the blood and gore thatís been going around.
    Last time I handout free saws, everyone seems to get cut up about it [emoji23].
    Iíve been contemplating having the back and the saw bolts ,silver plated on a saw Iíve been working on.

    Iím pretty sure ,Iíve seen that kit here before, but thanks for the reminder Wood pixel.

    Cheers Matt.





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  14. #59
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    Indeed.

    Some high end saws had nickel plated, brass hardware: Atkins 400/401, Disston Victory saws etc.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Indeed.

    Some high end saws had nickel plated, brass hardware: Atkins 400/401, Disston Victory saws etc.

    Regards
    Paul
    Iím fairly certain Iíve seen a silver plated surgeons saw too.

    Cheers Matt,

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