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  1. #61
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    Whew! I consider myself a pretty good turner, but to get an entire 60cm length of within 0.3mm was a bit of an ask!

    I do as IanW suggests, drill a hole in some MDF, cut it in half, this gives me perfect sizes for all my turnings. This is a trick taught to me by an old forumite (). When I turn pegs or dowels it makes it easy... just skew to just oversize and sand to fit, but an uncompromising +/-0.3mm would test my patience....

    BUT since its <0.3mm OVERSIZE, then this is a different thing entirely

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    as very much a beginner turner, I understood that a sharp gouge was the go to tool, with the skew only used for the last 1/2 mm or so
    Nah, gouges are for sissies. Once you get the skew working for you you'll hardly touch a gouge. I'm talking spindle turning, not bowls & face-plate stuff, that's a whole different ball-game...

    But I know what you mean by 'rusty' kidbee, I haven't done much turning myself, this last year or so, & was all thumbs when I went to turn a couple of simple things a couple of weeks ago. Bit like playing a musical instrument - daily practice is the go...

    Cheers,
    IW

  3. #63
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    Today, I thought I would make a nut for my first experiment of a wooden thread. I also purchased a plastic template from Beall for hex nut sizes. For a one inch thread the nut shown below is correct at 1 3/4” between the flats. However, I was not sure what thickness the nut should be, but opted for around 3/4”. Does it look proportionate? Ian W might guide me here.

    I then screwed the nut on the bolt until it was tight and put it back on the lathe. I put a chamfer on the edges using a small spindle gouge. Beall does his with a fixed belt sander.

    If you look closely, you can see there are some chips on the edges of the thread, but that was because I went too deep initially with the router bit.

    Overall, I had a lot of fun doing it.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kidbee View Post
    .....I was not sure what thickness the nut should be, but opted for around 3/4”. Does it look proportionate? Ian W might guide me here....
    Sorry, Kidbee, I don't have an opinion on that one. For all the wood threads I've made over nearly 40 years, I've never made a hex nut! All my wood threads have been for things like bench screws, clamps and suchlike, where the 'nuts' are part of the structure. But it looks like a perfectly good nut to me..

    The amount of chipping I can see looks relatively minor, and shouldn't affect performance in the least. Some bits of wood will chip a bit whatever you do, even those that normally thread perfectly - that's wood!

    I've used Merbau for 'nuts' several times & found it took a very clean internal thread, but I don't recall ever using it for a screw. Intuitively, I'd reckon it would be a bit 'average' for screws, because of the coarse grain, so to get as good a thread as it looks in the pics, I reckon you've done pretty well, particularly given it's one of your first ever....

    Cheers,
    IW

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kidbee View Post
    Today, I thought I would make a nut for my first experiment of a wooden thread. I also purchased a plastic template from Beall for hex nut sizes. For a one inch thread the nut shown below is correct at 1 3/4” between the flats. However, I was not sure what thickness the nut should be, but opted for around 3/4”.
    For screws/bolts/beams this dude is pretty open with what he does and how he goes about it: https://www.instagram.com/a_perfect_five_wdwx/

    He has lost ALL his fingers on the left hand and thumb in a horrific tablesaw accident!

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kidbee View Post
    Today, I thought I would make a nut for my first experiment of a wooden thread. I also purchased a plastic template from Beall for hex nut sizes. For a one inch thread the nut shown below is correct at 1 3/4” between the flats. However, I was not sure what thickness the nut should be, but opted for around 3/4”. Does it look proportionate? Ian W might guide me here.
    your nut is a bit on the thin side,
    for a 1" thread, the nut should be 55/64ths thick (which is a smidge under 7/8ths). A "heavy" nut would be 63/64ths thick. In mm those dimensions are close enough to 22 and 25 mm respectively, see here: https://www.fmwfasteners.com/blogs/f...nut-dimensions
    regards from Canada

    ian

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Nah, gouges are for sissies. Once you get the skew working for you you'll hardly touch a gouge. I'm talking spindle turning, not bowls & face-plate stuff, that's a whole different ball-game...
    perhaps it comes down to the teacher's philosophy or experience.

    the guy who taught me to turn is a disciple of Mike Darlow ("sanding is for those who don't know how to sharpen their tools or turn").
    So for him, all spindle shaping was done with a gouge, with the skew used right at the end to take out the tool marks -- in use I found the skew much like using a smoothing plane.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  8. #68
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    Well, Ian, I'm not going to argue with Mr. Darlow.

    I taught myself turning, so I probably do lots of things 'wrong'. I did read several books when I began, which contradicted each other sufficiently to confuse me. One chap said you could use a skew for almost anything in spindle-turning, and simplicity alwways appeals to me. I do use a heavy gouge for roughing out a large spindle like a table leg or bed post, but for small diameter turnings like back spindles on chairs, I tend to just use the skew from go to whoa. If there's a particularly small cove in the mix, I'll use a small gouge, but wider coves can be done with a skew, too.

    Probably not 'best practice', but there was a time when I got fed up with my day job and quit to start a new career as a furniture-maker. During the 18 months or so it took for me to realise I was never going to be a second Sam Maloof, I spent most of my time making Windsor chairs, & found it quicker to use one tool rather than keep switching between various types. I never got as good as some of the old chair bodgers I've read about, who were reputed to be able to turn out a leg every 2 minutes (on a pole lathe!), a finished leg every 8-10 minutes was my best score. In the couple of photos I've seen of bodgers at work, they were using what looked like roughing gouges, and the ribbons flying off on the cut strokes were pretty impressive. Don't know what other tools they used, but they must've got a pretty good finish off-tool, because they just used shavings as 'sandpaper'. I've tried that, and you can get a nice burnish, as long as you have a good surface to start with, but you certainly won't remove errant tool-marks unless you are prepared to spend an hour or two 'sanding'!

    Whatever tools you use, the more practice you can get the better. You have to be confident to wield the skew well - the minute I start thinking something could go wrong, it inevitably does!

    Cheers,
    IW

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    For screws/bolts/beams this dude is pretty open with what he does and how he goes about it: https://www.instagram.com/a_perfect_five_wdwx/

    He has lost ALL his fingers on the left hand and thumb in a horrific tablesaw accident!
    Thanks Woodpixel; he does nice work.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    your nut is a bit on the thin side,
    for a 1" thread, the nut should be 55/64ths thick (which is a smidge under 7/8ths). A "heavy" nut would be 63/64ths thick. In mm those dimensions are close enough to 22 and 25 mm respectively, see here: https://www.fmwfasteners.com/blogs/f...nut-dimensions
    Thanks Ian; appreciate you providing that information.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    perhaps it comes down to the teacher's philosophy or experience.

    the guy who taught me to turn is a disciple of Mike Darlow ("sanding is for those who don't know how to sharpen their tools or turn").
    So for him, all spindle shaping was done with a gouge, with the skew used right at the end to take out the tool marks -- in use I found the skew much like using a smoothing plane.
    If you view Allan Batty’s UK videos using the skew, he is turning a very soft timber that cuts like butter. But in saying that, his tool technique is superb.

    I was taught by a well known Queensland turner who turned hardwoods. He attacked the timber aggressively and there was no pussy-footing in his style of turning. I don’t think he ever used a scraper; everything was cut.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Well, Ian, I'm not going to argue with Mr. Darlow.
    neither was I, hence my post
    regards from Canada

    ian

  13. #73
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    A bit more time in my workshop and did my second thread, this time using Hairy Bark Oak. It appears I now have the cutter depth set correctly as the outside of the threads have a small flat surface which is what Beall suggests.

    I am impressed with this timber species, as the threads are nice and crisp with no chip-out whatsoever. See attached photo.

    I have ordered some 36mm diameter clocks which I intend to insert in the next couple I do; see photo example which I sourced from Beall’s book.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #74
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    Hairy Oak is a rather special timber. Very well done.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  15. #75
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    Indeed, what Paul said. In my experience it dries with less splitting/checking & is the nicest-working of the 'She-oaks', responds easily to hand-tools & all the bits I've had turned very well. Its only drawback is it's so susceptible to at least two kinds of wood-boring insects that can make a right mess of otherwise beautiful chunks of wood!

    Yep, gotta give you 10 out of 10 for that effort, it looks as close to perfect as you can get...

    Cheers,
    IW

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