Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,521

    Default Leda MJ-2325F 1300 Sliding Table Panel Saw

    I moved homes 12 months ago and had to downsize my workshop to a 3.5m x 4m room off the garage. Due to space constraints I sold off most of my old equipment but I kept an old 12" contractor TS, bandsaw and dusty. A few weeks ago the tablesaw blew up.

    I looked at a few new and used saws and after enjoying the floor space that had been freed up in the workshop I talked myself into the "I should just use the machines at the Men's shed" as needed.

    That was all well and good but a couple of weeks later we went into another Covid lock down - no Men's shed. I started looking at saws again. The Men's shed has a Sawstop Professional with sliding table attachment. The slider is way too far from the blade and hardly ever gets used and is mostly just in the way. The Sawstop at the shed has had a few misfires that make me a bit wary of that safety technology. As far as I am aware no misfire has been due to meat hitting the blade. There have been accidents with nails and aluminium edges and several otherwise unattributed events.

    I became persuaded of the relative safety features of a Euro style slider and the usage options it offered. I worked out I could just fit a small format slider into the workshop and started looking at the small DIY ones available. The Hammer K3 was out of my budget, but the Hare&Forbes (Record Power) TS250R small panel saw looked a possibility, however that was on backorder at H&F with an unknown delivery date.

    I then found LEDA had a small slider - the MJ2325F. I couldn't actually touch and feel either the TS250R or the Leda which was a problem in making a decision, but I found the closest manuals I could and compared them and the Leda looked a little more heavy duty and was about the same price as the H&F delivered. It was also in stock and available for delivery.

    The MJ2325F is essentially the same machine internally as the generic 10" ST254 tablesaw available from H&F and others. The slider however is entirely different to the accessory extension bolted on to the left hand table as in to the H&F ST254PT. The MJ2325F does away with a left hand cast iron table and is built with a Euro style slider abutting the blade. I think the accessory slider on the ST254PT would be just as annoying as I find the one on the Sawstop at the shed.

    The saw was delivered neatly in two boxes and wasn't difficult to assemble but it did require two people to lift it upright once the legs and lower panels were bolted on.

    unboxing.jpg

    The manual supplied in the box was better than some I have seen but I downloaded one from Axminster in the UK for their similar saw which was very much better and more helpful with assembly and alignment guide lines.

    assembled.jpg

    The standard accessories are basic. The mitre gauge on the cast iron table does not fit the slot on the slider. The Axminster version of the saw is slightly higher speced and has a separate mitre gauge for the slider side. It also explains why there is a shallow milling to the right of the shoe in the pic, it's there to hold an angle rule tape used with the slider side mitre gauge. However the long crosscut fence on the left extension is also used for angle cuts so I'm not sure of the benefits of having both.

    The cross cut fence is unfortunately a bit long for my workspace, for the moment I have simply removed it's extension bar which makes it passable, and I am resisting the urge to cut it down further. I want to keep the extension table connected for the moment although other users of small sliders seem to pop them on and off as required. (I have nowhere to store it anyway if I take it off!) The lowest speced Hammer K3 doesn't even come with one as standard.

    The first thing I did was make a Fritz and Franz jig so I didn't have to faff around with the shoe to hold boards. I had perverse delight in repurposing the plywood from my old crosscut sled to make the F&F!
    fritzUndFranz.jpg

    A high low accessory wasn't supplied with the Align-A-Rip fence and it seems an inappropriate style of fence for a slider, apart from the generally poor reviews of this style rip fence anyway. The Record Power and the Hammer come with an adjustable fence mounted to a solid steel bar that allows for safe positioning of the fence forward of the blade when using it as a width stop for cuts done from the slider side. I have added a removable 100mm offset block to the alloy fence to allow me to use it this way.
    dustGuard.jpg

    The supplied blade guard was useless at dust collection and I swapped it over for a clear one I had lying around, it sort of fits. The suction to the blade guard from the little spigot on the dust outlet on the cabinet is woeful so I have connected it to a y splitter on my dust collector hoses. It works much better now and I like having a clear view of the blade.
    collector.jpg

    My next modification will be to adjust a riving knife for non through cuts. Not sure what I'll do there as it it a bit awkward to change the riving knife and not something you would want to be doing frequently.
    Franklin

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Your images are more detailed than those supplied on the Leda website. looks to be a nicely made saw on the surface.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Berowra Waters
    Posts
    1,517

    Default

    That’s a good little saw, very similar to the woodfast one I had on the big house project here on the river.
    You don’t need to modify a riving knife for non through cuts, just take the knife off. Because you’re not cutting all the way through the timber, it won’t close up on the back of the blade anyway, we have done this for all my life and never had an issue, just remember to put the knife and it’s guard back on afterwards. Good luck and happy cutting.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by riverbuilder View Post
    Thatís a good little saw, very similar to the woodfast one
    I think Hare and Forbes introduced it as the Record Power before rebadging to Woodfast. I wish I had been able to do a hands on comparison of both before purchase, but I had to rely on looking at the specifications and go with what was available in stock.

    The Woodfast is a 2hp machine and the Leda a 3hp. Will the extra hp be noticeable? I don't know. Presumably because of the extra weight in the motor the mounting is quite different under the table. I have no idea which is better.

    On the outside, apart from the different rip fences the Leda has a concertinaing cast iron arm support for the extension table mounting, where the Woodfast has what appears to be a steel arm that telescopes. Which one flexes the most? I don't know.

    Compact-Panelsaw-MJ-2325F_16600159.h.jpg TS250RS-Panel-Saw-350-x-800mm-Cast-Iron-Table-254mm-Saw-Blade-Includes-1250mm-Sliding-Table_5385.jpg

    There are quite a few good reviews for the Record Power in Europe. The reviews for the generic ST254, the basis of the MJ-2325, are mixed. I'm not sure which one I would have gone for if both were available in stock.
    Franklin

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Berowra Waters
    Posts
    1,517

    Default

    The saw i had was a ts315, bigger than the current one, I think it was a shop floor demonstrator and they virtually gave it to me at cost so i marched it out. It had two motors, main is 3 hp, scriber, an excellent solid fence,and a 1300 slider. We flogged it for 3 years and it performed faultlessly. It changed my thinking on Chinese built machines it was impressive. Leda machines have been around for years, most of the stuff we’ve had and I’ve used at various places of work have been Taiwanese made, and they’ve performed well.

  7. #6
    Mobyturns's Avatar
    Mobyturns is offline In An Instant Your Life Can Change Forever
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    "Brownsville" Nth QLD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,532

    Default

    I've had a Woodfast TS250 for well over a decade. Initially I wanted an economical small foot print psuedo panel saw, it has filled that role well and has been a reliable work horse. It is a tad under-powered for ripping, and you can easily trigger the thermal overload protection if doing a lot of ripping. I have run it for hours on end cross cutting small components for inlay banding with no issues at all.

    Initially I spent a frustrating few days adjusting it to attain the accuracy I wanted for my inlay banding. Its certainly not perfect and never will be due to design constraints and manufacturing accuracy / precision, but certainly much better than delivered. However it offers excellent value for money imo. I use mainly table saw sleds attached to the slider and have achieved the accuracy and precision I was seeking and which is quite apparent in my inlay banding.

    Dust extraction is average at best, the saw blade guard flimsy imo, and swapping blades, removing/reinstalling the riving knife a real PIA initially as the slider has to be removed to access the blade arbor etc. The removal of the slider is not difficult and only entails removing one stop then sliding it out but still a PIA if you have set up sleds etc. The blade must be removed first to remove the riving knife with my model. The new slider design is totally revised so not sure about accessing arbor nut etc on them.

    The latest Woodfast / Record versions have many design revisions, most notably the fence & sliding table design, which imo would make it a far better saw than my version. The TS's design means that you may have to rethink how you proceed with some tasks. Only having one mitre slot in the cast iron table is one of those idiosyncrasies.
    Mobyturns

    In An Instant Your Life CanChange Forever

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    7,048

    Default

    Moby, where do you think it suffers in accuracy for your purposes?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    4,360

    Default

    I’m unfamiliar with sliding table saws so forgive the question. Can the sliding table section be folded away/removed?

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lappa View Post
    Iím unfamiliar with sliding table saws so forgive the question. Can the sliding table section be folded away/removed?
    The sliding table extension is removable, but the sliding beam itself is the "left wing" of the saw. The minimum configuration of the TS250RS for instance is like this.
    7_Shown-in-Standard-Confinguration.jpg
    Franklin

  11. #10
    Mobyturns's Avatar
    Mobyturns is offline In An Instant Your Life Can Change Forever
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    "Brownsville" Nth QLD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Moby, where do you think it suffers in accuracy for your purposes?
    Where would you like to start? Honestly the assembly leaves a lot to be desired and that is where most of the issues are found.

    The most frustrating part was adjusting the slider to run parallel to the saw blade. The method given in the manual does not and will not work because as you adjust say the parallel running the table co-linearity changes, or you introduce twist into the alum section etc. You end up chasing your tail. One has to realize that the saw is designed to fit a market niche / price point so things like the aluminium section are robust enough for typical DIY use. I'm pretty sure the designers never envisaged my applications as a routine task for their product, I'm pushing it to its accuracy / precision limits.

    As I like to think things through and look at other angles I quickly realized that there was a "better way" - simply adjust the support roller guides to take out the slop then adjust the supporting mount plate. Through constant use, the HDPE (?) support / guide rollers on the slider wear and require constant monitoring if you want to maintain accuracy / precision. That wear changes the slider height / parallel running / table-slider coplanarity (?) and introduces slop. But those issues are probably why they have discarded the slider support design and replaced it with a completely new setup.

    The new design has a revised fence support but in the images I have seen still suffers the quirks of the old design in that it requires substantial modification to get the fence to actually sit flat on the table. As standard it requires a sacrificial face attached to the fence if you wish to rip / size thin sheets. btw the supplied saw blades are rubbish.

    It's a moot point comparing my saws design with the current saw design because they are a very different beast now.
    Mobyturns

    In An Instant Your Life CanChange Forever

  12. #11
    Mobyturns's Avatar
    Mobyturns is offline In An Instant Your Life Can Change Forever
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    "Brownsville" Nth QLD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzie View Post
    The sliding table extension is removable, but the sliding beam itself is the "left wing" of the saw. The minimum configuration of the TS250RS for instance is like this.
    7_Shown-in-Standard-Confinguration.jpg
    That is correct, but the photo is of the newer design table the old vs new setup looks like this. Not only do you get the revised sliding table design you also get the parallelogram panel support as standard I believe.

    Overall I believe the TS250RS offers a pretty good value for money base package, certainly for the saws small workshop footprint.

    New woodfast TS250RS Panel Saws up to 2.5m in NORTHMEAD, NSW (machines4u.com.au)

    Record Power TS250RS 10" Table Saw With Heavy Duty Sliding Beam & Squaring Frame Sliding Beam - Bedford Saw & Tool - Tools, Accessories, Woodworking Machinery
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Mobyturns

    In An Instant Your Life CanChange Forever

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    7,048

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobyturns View Post
    Where would you like to start? Honestly the assembly leaves a lot to be desired and that is where most of the issues are found.

    The most frustrating part was adjusting the slider to run parallel to the saw blade. The method given in the manual does not and will not work because as you adjust say the parallel running the table co-linearity changes, or you introduce twist into the alum section etc. You end up chasing your tail. One has to realize that the saw is designed to fit a market niche / price point so things like the aluminium section are robust enough for typical DIY use. I'm pretty sure the designers never envisaged my applications as a routine task for their product, I'm pushing it to its accuracy / precision limits.

    As I like to think things through and look at other angles I quickly realized that there was a "better way" - simply adjust the support roller guides to take out the slop then adjust the supporting mount plate. Through constant use, the HDPE (?) support / guide rollers on the slider wear and require constant monitoring if you want to maintain accuracy / precision. That wear changes the slider height / parallel running / table-slider coplanarity (?) and introduces slop. But those issues are probably why they have discarded the slider support design and replaced it with a completely new setup.

    The new design has a revised fence support but in the images I have seen still suffers the quirks of the old design in that it requires substantial modification to get the fence to actually sit flat on the table. As standard it requires a sacrificial face attached to the fence if you wish to rip / size thin sheets. btw the supplied saw blades are rubbish.

    It's a moot point comparing my saws design with the current saw design because they are a very different beast now.
    I recently checked and adjusted my K3 Hammer and getting the correct toe out on the slider was the single hardest thing to do as it affected the table height and in the end more through luck than anything else I got it to the spec Hammer say it should be. The table height I have always had trouble with adjusting as the usual method is either 2 or 3 dial dial indicators or a straight edge and feeler gauges and I have never been happy with the result, it was fiddly and simply hard work trying to get it right. This time I lowered the sliding table below the cast iron table and set up a straight edge on the CI table sitting on a 4 thou feeler gauge and raised the sliding table until I could not see light under the straight edge and the whole thing took about 10 minutes and no swearing was involved. I will never use dial indicators or measuring with feeler gauges again. I used to spend hours doing the same operation and this time it too under 15 minutes for the whole thing.

Similar Threads

  1. leda MJ-2325F 1300
    By nebben838 in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26th February 2020, 07:45 PM
  2. Sliding Table on SCM Panel Saw Help Wanted
    By chambezio in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 13th October 2016, 06:16 PM
  3. Question on Hafco Sliding Table Panel Saw
    By david.elliott in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 5th May 2014, 11:19 PM
  4. Lubricant for sliding table of a Minimax panel saw?
    By Ben + in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21st September 2011, 09:56 PM
  5. Sliding Panel Saw vs Cabinet Table Saw?
    By RossM in forum TABLE SAWS & COMBINATIONS
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 25th April 2007, 05:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •