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  1. #16
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    Oct 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluddman View Post
    I put a Diablo D1060XZ on mine. It's a 60 tooth blade. Great improvement over the original blade and it works fine with the riving knife.

    Cheers
    With the higher teeth blades - is it a problem ripping or is it just slower? I see even the manufacturer (well, Freud anyway) will put that it's better for crosscutting than ripping, but I don't know why that would be...

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  3. #17
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    May 2011
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    You don't want to be ripping with any blade that is designed primarily for cross cutting. Even 40 and 50 tooth combination blades are pretty poor at ripping IMO. Once you've used a dedicated 24 tooth 10" rip blade you're unlikely to go back to a combination blade, the feed rate possible and the quality of the cut leave a combination blade for dead.

    Both tooth count and geometry determine the cutting characteristics of a blade. Slow feed rate, enforced by high tooth counts, can lead to burning on some woods. If you've ever had to sand burn marks off Blackwood you'll know what I'm talking about.

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by aldav View Post
    You don't want to be ripping with any blade that is designed primarily for cross cutting. Even 40 and 50 tooth combination blades are pretty poor at ripping IMO. Once you've used a dedicated 24 tooth 10" rip blade you're unlikely to go back to a combination blade, the feed rate possible and the quality of the cut leave a combination blade for dead.

    Both tooth count and geometry determine the cutting characteristics of a blade. Slow feed rate, enforced by high tooth counts, can lead to burning on some woods. If you've ever had to sand burn marks off Blackwood you'll know what I'm talking about.
    Damn it, that's a perfectly sensible answer. So, my plan to just put the D1080X on the table saw won't really work then...Do people end up changing out all the time, or using a chop saw for cross cutting or what? I think the current blade is 24T and while it cuts quickly, it isn't really smooth.

    Would I be better putting a higher count on the mitre saw?

  5. #19
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    May 2011
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    Albury
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    If you want to do anything other than weekend hack work you get used to changing blades. Yes it's inconvenient sometimes, but!

  6. #20
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    Aug 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by calgarychris View Post
    Damn it, that's a perfectly sensible answer. So, my plan to just put the D1080X on the table saw won't really work then...Do people end up changing out all the time, or using a chop saw for cross cutting or what? I think the current blade is 24T and while it cuts quickly, it isn't really smooth.

    Would I be better putting a higher count on the mitre saw?
    I think people were generally recommending the 80 tooth blade on your table saw to help you get a clean cut on plywood. As Aldav mentioned, using the high tooth blade to rip timber isn't the best - unless you are into pyrography!

    If possible, get blades that will fit both your mitre saw and table saw. You may want to cross cut wider timber boards on your table saw occasionally.

  7. #21
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    Perth
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    Quote Originally Posted by calgarychris View Post
    Damn it, that's a perfectly sensible answer. So, my plan to just put the D1080X on the table saw won't really work then...Do people end up changing out all the time, . . . .
    Yes - sometimes I change blades 3-4 times a day. My biggest headache when changing is remembering to close the 6" blast gate directly under the cabinet, otherwise if I drop the arbor nut/washer they fall into the ducting and can roll around the corner (its underfloor ducting) making removal tricky. I usually use a REE magnet stuck to a tape measure. Then I have to remember to open the blast gate again.

    . . . . .or using a chop saw for cross cutting or what? I think the current blade is 24T and while it cuts quickly, it isn't really smooth.
    Chop/SCMS for cross cutting - yes
    But, 24T on a TS doesn't do a very good job on sheet goods so you do need higher tooth count blade for that on a TS

    Would I be better putting a higher count on the mitre saw?
    Depends on what speed and finish you want.
    Higher tooth count means better finish but slower speed
    If you are are a pro roofing carpenter you probably care more about speed than finish
    If you are a cabinet maker maybe the other way around.

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tij View Post
    I think people were generally recommending the 80 tooth blade on your table saw to help you get a clean cut on plywood. As Aldav mentioned, using the high tooth blade to rip timber isn't the best - unless you are into pyrography!

    If possible, get blades that will fit both your mitre saw and table saw. You may want to cross cut wider timber boards on your table saw occasionally.
    They're both 10" but the bore is different...I have the Makita LS1018L which I believe has a 25.4mm bore size vs the 16mm in the TS...I guess you buy the blade and get the spacer?

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    Yes - sometimes I change blades 3-4 times a day. My biggest headache when changing is remembering to close the 6" blast gate directly under the cabinet, otherwise if I drop the arbor nut/washer they fall into the ducting and can roll around the corner (its underfloor ducting) making removal tricky. I usually use a REE magnet stuck to a tape measure. Then I have to remember to open the blast gate again.
    Sounds like you've got a nice setup if you've got underfloor ducting! I'll be asking you questions on dust collection then! haha - at the moment my garage is getting rather dusty!

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    Depends on what speed and finish you want.
    Higher tooth count means better finish but slower speed
    If you are are a pro roofing carpenter you probably care more about speed than finish
    If you are a cabinet maker maybe the other way around.
    What about absolute hack beginner?! . Blades that provide a nice finish (I don't care about speed). I'd rather get something decent to good rather than cheap as frustration will have me give up.

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    melbourne
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    I also have one of these saws.
    I built a small cabinet to put it on.
    Basically just a plywood box but its got three drawers which is useful.
    I made the cabinet to the height of my workbench so that it can be used as an outfeed table.
    The whole thing with the saw on top, which I fastened to the top of the cabinet, Is easily moved through 90degrees to crosscut longer pieces.
    My shed is quite small and anything longer than maybe 1200 I turn it so I can crosscut.
    As for dust collection, I went to Bunnings and bought plumbing fittings to fit the dust port and a reduction fitting so I can attach it to my Festool dust extractor. The saw also slaves power through the dusty so they both start together when powered up.

    I like the look of some of those different blades and will look at getting one for fine cuts.

    good luck with yours

    Frank

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by calgarychris View Post
    Sounds like you've got a nice setup if you've got underfloor ducting! I'll be asking you questions on dust collection then! haha - at the moment my garage is getting rather dusty!
    Go to the dust forum and read the sticky threads first.


    What about absolute hack beginner?! . Blades that provide a nice finish (I don't care about speed). I'd rather get something decent to good rather than cheap as frustration will have me give up.
    Might as well get an 80 tooth.

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattocks View Post
    I also have one of these saws.
    I built a small cabinet to put it on.
    Basically just a plywood box but its got three drawers which is useful.
    I made the cabinet to the height of my workbench so that it can be used as an outfeed table.
    The whole thing with the saw on top, which I fastened to the top of the cabinet, Is easily moved through 90degrees to crosscut longer pieces.
    My shed is quite small and anything longer than maybe 1200 I turn it so I can crosscut.
    As for dust collection, I went to Bunnings and bought plumbing fittings to fit the dust port and a reduction fitting so I can attach it to my Festool dust extractor. The saw also slaves power through the dusty so they both start together when powered up.
    Any photos you might be able to share? I'm on the lookout for good ideas!

    My shop vac fits the port on the TS, but it's loose and has fallen out twice, resulting in comical amounts of dust spraying everywhere...I need, as BobL suggests below, to read the dust forum!

    Thanks for the reply!

  13. #27
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    Jul 2010
    Location
    melbourne
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    Hi Calgarychris,
    a couple of pics of my desalt setup.
    The dust port is first.
    I just put foam tape around it to seal the fitting.
    The fitting has never fallen off and when I move the blade to 45 degrees it just rotates with it.
    Second pic is saw on cabinet I made.
    You can also see the zero clearance insert I made. Its just 12mm ply cut to shape the sat in and slowly bring the saw up to start the cut then take it out put the supplied insert in and finish the cut.
    My saw sits on a fibre cement sheet I used to make the floor level as its a very old shed and a paved floor.
    The saw is screwed to the top of the cabinet through holes already in the frame. It doesn't move.
    Its also 12mm higher than my bench to allow for the mitre gauge to travel through.
    I have also made a crosscut sled and this also allows it to travel fully across
    If I'm not using the mitre gauge and doing a long piece I just put a 12mm piece of ply on top of my bench for support.
    Although mostly I don't bother with this for just ripping a piece, unless I've turned the saw through 90 degrees to cross cut.
    Third pic is the fitting for dust extraction port with reduction piece to fit my dust extractor.

    Hope this makes sense. it might seem a bit complicated but isn't really and it works for me.
    As you can see my shed is long and narrow.
    What you can't see is my bandsaw and planer thicknesses which both fit in the space I'm standing in to take the pic from the door to the saw. The work bench has a bit of leather on it that I use when I'm up to the polishing stage of a piece. As I am with the coffee table you can see.

    Good luck with yours.

    Frank


    IMG_1955.jpgIMG_1953.jpgIMG_1954.jpg

  14. #28
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    Perth
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    Vacuum cleaners are of the few things that can be used for any sort of dust capture on a "portable" TS in mobile situations, but as shown on the table below (From Bill Pentz dust website) vacs fall a long way short of fine dust (stuff your cannot see) collection requirements for a Table saw.

    A vacuum cleaner generates between 100 - 130 CFM which is about 1/3rd of that required for fine/invisible dust collection.
    You really need two of them - one on the saw and one on the OH guard

    Even a stock standard 2HP with 2 x 100mm dust ports which generates ~570CFM falls short.
    A modified 2HP DC as per the sticky thread in the dust forum can generate close to 900 CFM provided 6" ducting is used.
    However to do that you will need to also modify the saw's dust system to utilise 6" dust ports.
    On most saws this requires completely gutting the shroud surrounding the underside of the blade and extracting from the underside of a semi-enclosed cabinet.

    Machinerydustflowrequirements.jpg
    Now I realize that for many reasons not many DIY woodies want to gut the internals of their gear so I offer another alternative.

    Go ahead and use vacs or small DCs to collect chips but use additional forced ventilation to extract fine dust from your workshop.
    Check out the Dust forum on how to do this.

    I've tested a range of difference forced ventilation situations (from multiple bathroom type fans to large Evap AC fans) and found them to be highly effective. This solution suits most Aussie conditions where we don't usually use ACs, or heating like Europeans and North Americans, in our sheds.
    Last edited by BobL; 31st October 2021 at 10:10 AM.

  15. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Sydney,Australia
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    I've been looking at this saw - I have several 5/8-16mm bore table saw blades for my Jet cabinet saw. Can the arbor on this take a skinny dado set? Something around 1/4-3/8 inch or so? I can't find any info in the online reviews.

  16. #30
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    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ryde, NSW, Australia
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    61
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsrlee View Post
    I've been looking at this saw - I have several 5/8-16mm bore table saw blades for my Jet cabinet saw. Can the arbor on this take a skinny dado set? Something around 1/4-3/8 inch or so? I can't find any info in the online reviews.
    Yes. This was a plus for the DeWalt compared to similar offerings from other manufactures. I can stack a 6mm and a 4mm flat top blade set on mine.

    Cheers

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