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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    63
    Posts
    69

    Default Table Saw Gurus, Help!!!

    Guys,
    I think I know your answer but I need your thoughts. I've long had my eye on MJ 2325-B table saw but after my disappointment with the "bargains" at the ACT working with wood show I ended up buying the Ryobi BT3100K table saw. It came with the accessory kit and some show special extras including the wheel kit, fence extension, 6" stacked dado set, extra throat plates, a 2100 watt Ryobi 1/2" soft-start, variable speed router and a two year trade warranty. It's a great little machine for an excellent price. It has loads of features but I just can't feel 100% happy that I've made the right choice. I haven't even unpacked the box yet just in case I decide to return it. The things that are bugging me are;

    1. Cast aluminium table top rather than cast iron.
    2. Slightly smaller table top compared to a cabinet saw.
    3. 15 amp 2-1/2 hp belt driven universal motor. reasonably quiet and vibration free, but it's not an induction motor.
    4. Base is like a contractors saw stand, not a cabinet.

    Things that I like;
    1. Inbuilt sliding mitre table and fence.
    2. 90mm depth of cut.
    3. Has wheels so it is moveable.
    4. Doesn't take up a lot of space.
    5. Inbuilt router table.
    6. Relocatable table top modules.
    7. Standard sized arbor (16mm)
    8. Takes full sized dado stack.

    I am just a hobby woodworker but I want to buy right and buy once. Your advice would be appreciated.

    Cheers
    Pete

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD, Australia
    Age
    42
    Posts
    2,074

    Default

    If these features are "really" important to you, stick with the Ryobi:

    3. Has wheels so it is moveable.
    4. Doesn't take up a lot of space.
    5. Inbuilt router table.

    Although you can get a base for a cabinet saw, they are much heavier and not as easy to move around, and forget about taking them offsite! You can also get a router table attachment for some cab saws, but these cost extra etc.

    Portability is the main selling point with the BT3100K if you ask me.
    Woodworking Product Reviews - Over 200+ Online
    http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Turramurra, NSW
    Posts
    2,267

    Default

    Pete

    The negatives you list are all relativelt trivial, excepting the alum table. The question is "is the table flat and will it stay flat?"

    Points 3 and 4 seem emotional rather than functional.

    It seems that your perceived positives far outweigh yr 2 two practical negatives

    I have an earlier version of this saw and I'll list my issues, hopefully all of which have been addressed in this upgraded model:

    1. The fence is absolute krap
    2. The table is not flat
    3. Won't take a Dado set
    4. The mitre slide is a joke.
    5. The table is ridiculously small.
    6. The insert is very non standard and I had a hell of a time making a zero clearance one
    7. The slots are non standard.

    Positives:

    1. I paid $100
    2. The motor's got enough grunt
    3. The open stand may be easily boxed in and dust extraction fitted
    4. The depth of cut is fine and compares to real table saws.

    I guess the question is, "how much did you pay?"

    A standard table saw from Carbatec starts at $900, add Dado set, subtract the router, wheels etc and ask yourself what you got.

    In the end all that matters is that you're a happy camper.
    Bodgy
    "Is it not enough simply to be able to appreciate the beauty of the garden without it being necessary to believe that there are faeries at the bottom of it? " Douglas Adams

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Chuwar QLD
    Posts
    241

    Default

    Pete - you've probably read my thread below. The reason I'm looking for a new TS is that when I started kitting up 3 years ago I didn't know if I needed a TS so I bought the cheap Ryobi from Bunnies (not your version) and as Bodgy says the fence is Krap - making it almost redundant. Of course the crunch is the next step up which is circa $700 - $1000?
    Fantastic cheese Grommit!!

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    61
    Posts
    11,998

    Default

    The hardest decision to make is whether to not buy now and save a little bit more for a better model.

    It is also the most regretted.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Outer Melb SE suburb, Vic
    Age
    50
    Posts
    4,156

    Default

    There are forums dedicated to the ryobi t/saws, same as triton I guess they have their shortcomings but also have their fair share of fans too.

    btforums or somesuch I think.


    Cheers..................Sean


    The beatings will continue until morale improves.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    64
    Posts
    10,882

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Packrat Pete View Post
    Guys,
    I think I know your answer but I need your thoughts. I've long had my eye on MJ 2325-B table saw but after my disappointment with the "bargains" at the ACT working with wood show I ended up buying the Ryobi BT3100K table saw. It came with the accessory kit and some show special extras including the wheel kit, fence extension, 6" stacked dado set, extra throat plates, a 2100 watt Ryobi 1/2" soft-start, variable speed router and a two year trade warranty. It's a great little machine for an excellent price. It has loads of features but I just can't feel 100% happy that I've made the right choice. I haven't even unpacked the box yet just in case I decide to return it. The things that are bugging me are;

    1. Cast aluminium table top rather than cast iron.
    2. Slightly smaller table top compared to a cabinet saw.
    3. 15 amp 2-1/2 hp belt driven universal motor. reasonably quiet and vibration free, but it's not an induction motor.
    4. Base is like a contractors saw stand, not a cabinet.
    Pete
    I don't think any of these really matter. Your choice was between this, a Triton or the MJ 2325-B.
    The base can easily be enclosed with ply making dust extraction more efficient, the size of the top is really only an issue if you regularly make things that are too big to comfortably handle on the top.


    ian

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sydney,Australia
    Posts
    3,152

    Default

    Mate of mine has one of the older Ryobi table saws - dust extraction is pretty good as it has a shrouded blade inside the cabinet & it shoots all the dust out a 4" pipe at the back, even without a dust sucker.

    The top flatness will vary from saw to saw, a lot depends on how far it has been dropped and how well you put it together. It won't rust . A lot can be done for the non-standard slots if they are big enough - just buy alum. channel and screw or glue it in place - there was a reader's tip in a recent FWW mag about this.

    Fence - there is an old thread around here about making your own fence, should be easily adaptable to the Ryobi.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Age
    63
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Heres the link to the BT3 saw forums and web site.

    http://www.bt3central.com/

    There's a hell of a lot of info and some interesting characters here. I spend a lot of time on these forums althought I dont have a Ryobi saw.

    Check out the section entitled articles. There are some really good setups for you to look at.

    Rod Kirby are you here? Having had a bt3 for some time you may be more able than I to help.

    But please checkout the site as it will address any questions or misgivings you may have about the saw.
    Dust Mite...Terrorising noses for the discerning...
    Pirongia Pens & Woodcraft

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Leithfield, New Zealand
    Posts
    914

    Default

    That MJ had some issues... worth hunting back through the threads.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,894

    Default

    I bought the MJ 2325-B earlier this year. This upgraded model came with a 3HP motor and a 1" arbor.
    I have since added a new CMT 48 tooth combination fine cut blade.
    Everything seems to work fine but be aware that the fence is marginal [keep checking square].
    Regards,
    Bob
    PS - it is a 15A machine which does require the correct electrical plugs/outlet etc.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Leithfield, New Zealand
    Posts
    914

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob38S View Post
    I bought the MJ 2325-B earlier this year....

    OK, there was talk of a bad batch (crook surfaces) about this time last year. Obviously they got it sorted. A 15Amp motor fuse on a 10 Amp circuit will keep it from taking down the National Grid. Regards

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,894

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayD99 View Post
    OK, there was talk of a bad batch (crook surfaces) about this time last year. Obviously they got it sorted. A 15Amp motor fuse on a 10 Amp circuit will keep it from taking down the National Grid. Regards
    I'm no sparkie but that does not seem like a real "flash" idea to me.
    It seems almost as "flash" as the idea of filing down the Earth pin to fit a 10A socket/GPO
    OR
    Making a dummy 15A socket ->10A male plug to then plug into a 10A GPO
    I have heard of both from my sparkie but not seen it.

    The above may work but not for me or my insurance company [these blokes could walk upright under a snake's belly - so why give them ammunition to reject/holdup a claim - should it happen]

    I don't recall the cost of the 15A circuit, breaker, extension lead and plugs but I paid it so as to avoid any problems - also had a nice cold beer and a yarn with my sparkie when we finished
    Regards,
    Bob

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Age
    71
    Posts
    218

    Default

    My penny worth:
    The saw is rated at 1800W which divided by 240volts gives 7.5 Amp draw, therefore a standard outlet should be OK. The 15 Amp would be if run on the USA 110v.

    I had a look at this saw at the Brisbane show and was quite impressed with value for money - especially when you take into account the router thrown in, and I have been considering one myself - I have a few concerns different to those stated. The quality is vastly improved from the cheapie being sold in the stores for a few hundred $.

    With a 2yr trade warranty Ryobi must be reasonably confident in the product

    Hey, Packrat Pete - if you decide to return it what will the combined cost be to replace all the features you have in this bundle, and do you have or want to spend that amount? If you do keep it I'll be very interested in your comments.

    Have you checked out Dean's review at http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/rev...obiBT3100K.htm

    Last thought - if you go with it you can evaluate your need to spend more money on higher quality gear as you gain experience and it should retain a reasonable resale value.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Broken Hill
    Posts
    540

    Default Ask Flooby a question. . .

    Hi Flooby
    Not wanting to hijack the thread here - but. . .
    Your comment calculation:
    Quote:[My penny worth:
    The saw is rated at 1800W which divided by 240volts gives 7.5 Amp draw, therefore a standard outlet should be OK. The 15 Amp would be if run on the USA 110v] unquote:
    If I do the same calculation for my new TS250 2.8 HP 2100W induction, the rating comes out at 8.75. . .
    So can I take it that I DON'T NEED to install a 15A line to the shed. . ??
    Currently I only run an extension rated 10A. The motor is slowish to start but once up to speed (2.5 - 3 seconds) whirrs along comfortable...
    Do I just wire in a 10A line?
    Using what? - 2mm core cable?
    Thanks if you can help
    Cheers
    Jedo

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