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  1. #1
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    Default Old shoulder planes

    I recently missed out on a near new shoulder plane on the forum which I thought might come in handy for tenons I will be cutting out shortly for my (delayed) new bench project. Then I had the though that I might already have one amongst my late grandfather's plane collection. Sure enough there was one if not two amongst the collection of wooden planes.
    I cleaned them up with orange oil and flattened the blade backs, cleaned off the rust and gave them a light hone as that was all that was needed. They seemed to perform quite well on some scrap kauri.
    I have a couple of questions on the two planes.
    The first one has no markings other than my grandfather's name stamped on the end. What I am curious about is that the blade is at about a 77 degree angle to the body. The blade itself is a Mathieson blade. Why the angle?
    The second plane has what seems to me an odd shaped body. The maker's name is Lund of London which a google search told me were manufacturers of moulding planes. I am wondering if the body shape is correct or is it a re-purposed moulding plane? It has a steel sole screwed to the base as you can see in the pictures.
    Any insights would be appreciated.
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  3. #2
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    Millmerran,QLD
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    Colin

    I think the first plane is actually a skew rebate rather than a shoulder plane. The 'modified' plane is just that, modified. Possibly the mouth was too wide and the steel sole is to rectify that problem. Wider shoulder planes are not always full width at the top but I don't know about the side angle. That's odd to my mind. Possibly modified for a specific purpose.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  4. #3
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    Colin

    What I meant to add and I think is more bizarre is the bolts on the second plane. Was it to prevent cracking. It seems extreme and not a little unsightly. Perhaps that was all he had.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  5. #4
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    Default

    Paul
    I suspect that you are correct, there is a crack in one end. The name Robins is stamped in one end so it would seem that my grandfather was not the original owner. A fair chance that the original owner scrapped it and my gf grabbed it and re-purposed into what you see. I have my doubts that he ever threw anything out. He was born in 1889 and I think lived through some tough times. His collection of old tobacco tins contain a myriad of small things, some of which I just smile at and shake my head.

  6. #5
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    Default

    Hi,
    the Lund plane with the metal L plate on the bottom is a rebate plane.
    The purpose of the L plate is to keep the right hand (looking down from above) corner of the plane a nice sharp square shape.
    When the right hand edge is wood without any protection then it becomes rounded quite quickly - as I've found from my experience.
    If you look at this video: We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Fences! | The Renaissance Woodworker
    you'll see Shannon making a rebate from start to finish using one of these planes with no fence.
    The trick is to scribe a shallow groove from end to end to set the width of the rebate and then tilt the plane 45 degrees so the right hand edge slides in the groove and then start planing to begin the rebate. As each end to end stroke is done, the plane gets slowly brought back up to 90 degrees flat.
    However this quickly puts wear on the right hand edge so it becomes rounded and no longer accurately slides in the groove - learned this through experience.
    The metal edge won't wear very fast and stays sharply cornered so the plane doesn't have the above problem.
    Paul
    New Zealand

  7. #6
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    Default

    Paul, a couple of more things that may be of interest.
    A backsaw that I missed from a previous thread. I don't know if the handle is original, certainly the mounting hardware isn't. Any ideas on the small piece of dowel with a nail sticking out?
    Also I mentioned my gf's tobacco tin collection. Here is his saw bits one and contents.
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  8. #7
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    Your Lund plane looks like an old one. I looked it up.


    British Plane makers
    from 1700 2nd edition
    greatly enlarged

    Arnold & Walker

    IMG_1996.JPG aa.jpg

    You can see he had three stamp types , two addresses from 1812-24 and 1826-32 and yours looks to be the early one . I.Lund London . ZB is Zigzag boarder or serrated boarder and they had 13 examples of that type . I cant see the dot though . Between I and Lund . Its hidden somewhere in there .

    Its a good book .


    Rob

  9. #8
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    Default

    Wow, thanks Rob. When I go back next weekend I will have another look using a magnifying glass.

  10. #9
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    HPF

    Spear and Jackson made saws with what they called an "unbrake handle." I had a dowel placed through the length of the grip. Not at home and have lost my glasses so struggling to provide more information at the moment. Perhaps others can help.

    This one however, looks like a bodgy repair. I don't know why it would have been needed (can't really see detail without my glasses) and the nail, of course, shouldn't be there.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  11. #10
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    Default

    Hi Rob, the dot is definitely there. This is a clearer picture.
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  12. #11
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    Default S & J non breakable handle

    Hi Colin,

    just to add a bit more regarding your back saw and its handle with the dowel and mystery nail.

    As Paul has said S & J did have on some of their saws, so called non breakable handles with a dowel through
    the grip that also had an advertising button pinned to the top of the dowel, with the words 'non breakable handle'

    But it is a false hood, as the pictured panel saw did have a break through the grip, I was able to
    remove the dowel clean and glue up the break and replace the dowel and button, which is also
    fragile and is often missing.

    There may have been a problem when the dowel was first inserted during manufacture,
    with any glue being pushed out of the hole.

    In fairness, without the dowel the damage could have been a lot worse.

    I have not seen this gimmick feature on any other manufacturers saws.

    The two saws pictured are Spearior 88's, one being a 28" rip saw, the other
    a 22" cross cut panel saw.

    Hope this is of some help to you.

    Graham.
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  13. #12
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    Default

    Thanks Graham, the handle certainly has unbreakable stamped into it

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huon pine fan View Post
    Hi Rob, the dot is definitely there. This is a clearer picture.
    Oh Wow ! There it is . Its huge . I was expecting a much smaller one . It was staring me in the face all the time

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