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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rushworth, Victoria
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Should be impressive when itís done
    "World's oldest kid"

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    59
    Posts
    214

    Default Pre-assemble & finishing

    The columns were fitted, I put the whole thing together and made some adjustments to placement of hinges, catches etc., then took it all apart for the finishing job. My bench was converted to a sanding / pore filling / polishing station, lined with a fresh piece of butcher's paper to keep the components clean (also useful for testing output from the rubber!)

    Well, it's not a small job doing the french polish. I started on the base, top & lid first. I had already made a start on the columns and the dial frame.

    After sanding to 1200 grit, the surfaces that will be polished showed a pronounced chatoyance, very pleasing to the eye and brought out wonderfully by the polish. The piece in the third photo has only been sanding sealed, not polished yet or even pore-filled. I filled other components with Aquacoat, but then also filled using the standard 4F pumice method over the top just to even out the last of the pores. The last photos show how things are turning out. I've done four sessions of FP so far, I will keep going, maybe another 3 or so. Now my hands smell of shellac all the time!
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    Swifty

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    59
    Posts
    214

    Default French polishing nearly done

    I've been away from the shed for a couple of weeks, then I carried on with the FP of the components. I think it is going OK, my biggest fear is damaging the polish when I put it all back together.

    I had almost finished the top moulding when, of course, I made a boo-boo and had too much moisture in the rubber, wiped it on and realised my mistake a bit too late, damage done in just one swipe. Well, that's FP for you! I'll sand it back and redo it, not a biggie really.

    I also got the glass cut for the front door, just a piece of 2mm clear glass cut by our friends at Mandurah Glass. All going well it will be done in the next week - dare I say this weekend?

    Beautiful weather to be in the shed in Perth the last few days, just great!

    Cheers
    Swifty
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    Swifty

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    59
    Posts
    214

    Default Door

    The french polishing on the door was next, some burly bits in there look nice.

    Now regarding the AquaCoat, the jury is in. Third frame shows the top profile, the flat surface has been filled using the traditional pumice method, but the adjacent curved (cove) was only filled with AquaCoat. The Aquacoat is clear, so the pores look a bit strange to me, very light, compared to the dark filling seen on the pumiced surface. Also I noticed the Aquacoat gives a wierdish sheen, almost like the colour has been shifted to green. So maybe I'm doing something wrong with the Aquacoat. I'll stick to the pumice method from now on I reckon, at least for relatively small surfaces like in this project.

    The glass was cut and I had to cut the retaining strips, doing the round bit with my home made circle cutting jig on the bandsaw. The strips were then tacked in with some tiny nails. The last picture shows the door mounted onto the case. Getting close now! Just need to finish the top / lid for the winding key storage and put a knob and catch on the back door.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Swifty

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Kew, Vic
    Posts
    997

    Default

    Swifty,

    Interested to hear about your experience with Acquacoat. I've used it extensively for several years and not come across either the green cast issue or the light pores. I wonder what we're doing differently. I've used it on Madrone, Ebony Macassar, Blackwood, Tulipwood, Burmese Rosewood and many others but admittedly not on many Australian timbers.

    Any other users out there like to chip in with their experiences?

    Regards,

    Brian

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    59
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Brian, I think part of my problem was I sanded to 1200 grit, some of the fine whitish dust from this grit stayed in the pores and because I used only a microfibre cloth and not a tack rag, the dust stayed in there and stayed visible under the Aquacoat when it dried clear. Cheers, Swifty.


    Quote Originally Posted by homey View Post
    Swifty,

    Interested to hear about your experience with Acquacoat. I've used it extensively for several years and not come across either the green cast issue or the light pores. I wonder what we're doing differently. I've used it on Madrone, Ebony Macassar, Blackwood, Tulipwood, Burmese Rosewood and many others but admittedly not on many Australian timbers.

    Any other users out there like to chip in with their experiences?

    Regards,

    Brian
    Swifty

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rushworth, Victoria
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Do you use a vacuum to clear the pores? Only prob is then it raises the dust in workshop, you have to do it outside.
    "World's oldest kid"

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    59
    Posts
    214

    Default Completed

    I got hold of some self-adhesive baize to line the top "secret chamber", which holds the key, clock manual and a small phial of synthetic oil. The last steps were to mount the hinges on the lid, and insert the movement and secure to the base with a couple of bolts. The clock is mounted via the rear door, it only needs to come out once every five years for a service. So all done, I'll take it down to my son's place as soon as it stops raining here in Perth.
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    Swifty

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Christchurch New Zealand
    Age
    79
    Posts
    179

    Default

    That is a great looking clock I am sure your son will be thrilled you should be very proud.

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Far Western NSW
    Posts
    60

    Default

    I've really enjoyed watching you put this together. A beautiful clock.

    Thanks,

    Mick.

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rushworth, Victoria
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Stunning Swifty and I love the drawer on top for the key. Thatís thoughtful. Feels good to finish a project and stand back.
    "World's oldest kid"

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,035

    Default

    I love it and great idea for the hinged top. I can imagine what a pain it must've been french polishing small parts.

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    849

    Default

    That's a fantastic looking clock, and french polishing all those parts to boot...

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