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  1. #61
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    Aug 2005
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    Queensland
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    Not to influence anyone, but, I’m a big fan of glue+screw, just ensure the dry fit is “perfect “ or as near to it as possible and go for it.

    Without checking above, I understand that you will be using hide glue, so, anyone in the future will be thankful for your efforts should it become necessary.
    Regards,
    Bob

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
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    51
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    6,862

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    G’day Bob38S,

    Thanks mate. I’m always for more than it might need 👍 and so I’d rather be sure than sorry.

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
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    Default Creating some ballast beneath the pedestal base

    One of the next things I worked on was to create a boxed housing (that sounds pretty good ) with some ballast so that the grandfather clock would be more stable standing in its final home.

    After a suggestion from Bob38S, I searched for some lead shot. I soon found a place back up in Brisbane (my home city) and ordered the stuff. Not cheap at $115 plus delivery, but after some searching I reckoned it was my best bet.

    IMG_7047.jpg

    You'll notice there's a gap between the right pedestal return and pedestal base. I came back later to mix some white glue and mahogany dust as a filler. It wasn't what I wanted to happen, but I couldn't see this gap with the gazzillion clamps I used in the glue up.

    So my thinking was how to do this and it'd be one of the last several things to happen once I've moved the grandfather clock out of the shed and up into the house. So I set about a box, fixed to the underside of the pedestal base.

    Shot below is of the pre-drilled parts to form the box, with just enough room that the bag of lead shot would slip in and if you got on your hands and knees that you wouldn't see the box on the underneath of the pedestal base.

    IMG_7048.jpg

    I wanted something that would have the strength to hold 10kg of weight for a lifetime, so I settled on Spotted Gum.

    I also wanted to make sure it'd last a few lifetimes, so in the next shot you'll see I've not held back on the screws to make the box and also to fix it to the underside of the pedestal base.

    IMG_7049 2.jpg IMG_7054.jpg

    There are 24 screws in the box construction and 11 securing it to the underside of the pedestal base. It's not going anywhere. Once the lead shot is in place, there'll be a cover which will also screw in and stop the lead shot from ever falling out, given that one day the plastic bag will finally fall to pieces, at least that's what I'd expect to happen.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  5. #64
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    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
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    Default

    Just a thought, as the shot will be there permanently, give a thought to removing the plastic bag, and putting the shot into a layer of resin. It will the be permanently in place and should the clock ever be moved the shot can’t move or become lopsided. It would also become fixed in place and never be an issue.
    Regards,
    Bob

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Default

    Not a bad idea Bob38S 👍

  7. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Oberon, NSW
    Age
    62
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    13,147

    Default

    Either that or make a cotton/linen slip cover for it.

    How're your sewing skills?
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

    - Andy Mc

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
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    Default

    As good as your skills in skydiving I’d guess. If I asked SHMBO to see up a slip for it, I’d first get asked, ‘when did you get that?’ And ‘how much did that cost you?’ But good idea mate

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
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    51
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    6,862

    Default Split crown moulding- part 1

    Every step of this build has been something I've looked forward to, the crown moulding in particular, partly due to the amount of planning and experimentation I'd done to get to the point of starting it.

    When I first got the Fijian mahogany I went through the boards looking at the grain and figure and then marked boards for certain uses. For some boards I needed some wide pieces and thankfully with the Fijian mahogany I'm able to get boards up to a bit over 500mm wide. For the split crown front frame and crown frame returns (like everything I do) I look for a board where I can get enough to complete several pieces and have the grain run through those pieces.

    So I started out on the split crown front frame and using the template I'd created, marked it against the stock ready to take to the bandsaw.

    IMG_7018.jpg IMG_7019.jpg IMG_7020.jpg

    I hadn't yet worked out the sort of profile I wanted to give to the bottom part of the front frame, so I experimented with a combination of profiles and built up a dummy of the combination of components to see if I was happy with it. Below I've got the dial trim panel, a dummy bit of timber to simulate to the door and a possible profile of the front crown frame.

    IMG_7021.jpg

    Next up I began routing components that would build up the crown profile.

    IMG_7026.jpg

    This big sucker of a bit from Infinity Tools created a stack of dust and shavings that went everywhere, so I had to take a break a bring out the vacuum.

    IMG_7027.jpg

    As I created the the individual profiles I stacked them to see that I was realising what I had envisaged.

    IMG_7029.jpg

    Then sanded them down to a mirror finish of 1500 grit

    IMG_7044.jpg

    At this point I had to think out methodically how I was going to end up routing the crown profile to the template (I'll cover that in part 2 of the split crown moulding) and glue it to the split crown front frame. The dilemma being that before the individual crown profiles were roughed to shape and finally router, that when I stacked them as they presently are, that by stacking them they are in the spot they need to be.

    Next step was progressively glueing them (the router table ended up becoming at the end of each day or at the end of each weekend a secondary assembly glue up surface).

    IMG_7045.jpg IMG_7046.jpg
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
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    51
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    Default Trim caps

    One of the things I moved onto next were the trim caps. The caps are fixed to the top of the base.

    They're pretty simple, just router the desired profile mitre them and glue.

    The fun part of it was that I had to stand the grandfather clock up, which is the first time it's been in this position. So it was good to see the size and scale of it.

    IMG_7155.jpg

    Next shot shows the underside of the trim, it's made up from a beading bit and a round cove.

    IMG_7158.jpg

    After having installed the left trim and then presented the from trim in place, I found that I needed to pack up the right side of the front trim so that the profiles of the two nicely aligned. It was no drama and an easy solution.

    IMG_7159.jpg

    One thing that you might have noticed is the difference in how dark the timber may or may not look. I found that in its rough sawn state the Fijian Mahogany darkens up quicker, opposed to when it's sanded. So with the later I have to leave it exposed to the air for longer. Once I've finished the assembly of this grandfather clock I'm then going to let it air for a while until it gets that's nice dark orange tone that I like in it.

    Trim caps installed.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
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    51
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    Default The thing

    I don't know what this element of a grandfather clock is called, so I'm calling it a thing. Some grandfather clocks have them, others don't and I like it when they do have them.

    This thing runs from the left crown frame return, the split crown frame and over to the right crown frame return.

    It was fiddly to make:
    - It required a template to route the profile;
    - then take it to the oscillating spindle sander to take it down carefully and slowly down to the pencil line;
    - pair the transitions from the horizontal profile where it meets the arc nicely at 90º; and
    - then carefully sand it down to the final grit of 1500.

    I was expecting the worst at any stage where it might just break apart, but it all went nicely.

    IMG_7184.jpg

    Next up I think I'll continue on the split crown frame with it's right and left returns. I'm looking forward to it, but it's one of those things that's taken hours so far and the next step of putting it all together and not stuffing up in metering etc. is a bit daunting.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,882

    Default

    G'day.

    In Architecture it would be called a transom I think.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  13. #72
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    Mar 2005
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    Default

    Thanks Cliff, I’ll go with that. So it’s now got boat bits in the clock 😁
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
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    Default Crown moulding part 2

    Screen Shot 2021-05-03 at 5.54.50 pm.jpg

    I've been a bit nervous about this next step in the crown moulding and had gone backwards and forwards measuring things, which I'm glad I did, otherwise I would've stuffed up as what I'd marked as my lines to cut to on the bandsaw, they were a bit out.


    Here I've marked out where the moulding sits to the split crown frame and tapped it up so that...

    IMG_7211.jpg

    I can flip it over and mark where I want to screw the two together. This was the best way I could use the screws as pins to locate the position of moulding...

    IMG_7212.jpg

    From here I took the moulding to the bandsaw and roughed it out...

    IMG_7213.jpg

    It's now really starting to take shape and I can see all the effort of the many hours it's taken to get to this point.

    IMG_7214.jpg

    You can see in the above shot I've had to add some blocks to the 2nd and 3rd profiles in the moulding. I was just shy of about .5–1mm had I had taken this to the router to finally get the moulding finished.

    Next up I'll be playing with different profiles as options for the finial mounting plate and finish off the split crown moulding.



    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  15. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Rushworth, Victoria
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Hi Waldo, I’m following with interest as a GFC is on my honey do list. With the crown moulding does it turn the corner and run back along the sides?
    Andrew
    "World's oldest kid"

  16. #75
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    Mar 2005
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    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
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    Default

    G’day Andrew, yes the crown moulding runs around to the sides 👍

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