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  1. #106
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    52
    Posts
    8,872

    Default

    Last birthday present

    Don't worry I'll be here.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  2. # ADS
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  3. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default

    Wongo, knowing you care and show it publically, gets me through each day and makes the grey clouds go away.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  4. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default Door v2

    Well I pondered and mused as I did other stuff in the shed, and after a week of looking at the door I wasn't happy with it, I knew that as soon as I realised how nothing lined up, but I needed to know I couldn't live with it being the ay it was. So I thought stuff it, hang the expense of 2.4m of timber, I'll get it right and not have to live with it always bugging me if I didn't get it done the way I'd envisaged it from the start. The biggest drama with the new piece of timber I got, which I didn't realise at the time, until I had put it through the linear router sled and dimensioned on the thicknesser, was that it showed signs of being kiln dried too fast. If I remember I'll put some photos up. Thankfully I was able to cut around it all.

    IMG_7955.jpg

    IMG_7954.jpg

    IMG_7956.jpg

    IMG_7959.jpg


    Now everything lines up on the horizontal plane from the door to clock sides with the rails and raised panels.

    There's still a fair amount of routing to door and marking the locations of the hinges yet, which will have to wait until a router bit arrives.
    In the meantime I'm working on the side doors and the columns, but these will have to wait for another day as I've got a bit of navel fluff to look at etc.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  5. #109
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    52
    Posts
    8,872

    Default

    Getting there slowly mate.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  6. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default

    Slowly Wongo San, but getting towards the pointy end now.

  7. #111
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    52
    Posts
    8,872

    Default

    Waldo, today is the only day of the year when you and I share same age. Have a good one old man.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  8. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default Aww shucks

    Thanks Wongo, I'm touched.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  9. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default Front door continued

    I've been hard at it every weekend, but sometimes those weekends (given it's now Winter as well) are tiny steps, mainly because they're the moments that if I stuff up there's no return, especially on the front door as I have to be 100% that what I've worked out and measured is accurate as there are no tolerances now.

    So continuing the front door has been incremental wins. I'm going to fast forward with a progress shot just below to demonstrate what I'm going to try and explain.

    IMG_8121.jpg

    With the column end posts and the column end caps shown above and the door having about 5-6mm clearance I needed a hinge that would allow me to fix doors in different ways to give me the clearance I needed, and inset the doors to my vision. Looking at the photo above you can hopefully see that with a normal hinge and the proximity of it to the column end posts and column end caps that it wouldn't be possible to open. So way back when I started to get together my ideas of building a grandfather clock I had to think about hinges. Graeme Brown Antiques in Malvern, VIC are my go to for hinges, locks etc. So I had a look to see what they had and work if it was fit for purpose.

    I got from them some bent flap hinges, similar to these below from CMI in Brisbane. I did get these in from CMI initially, but the quality was pretty poor.

    Screen Shot 2022-07-05 at 5.54.40 pm.png

    What I did find at Graeme Brown Antiques was the same hinge type but they were in antique bronze and much better quality, which after a bit of mulling over I went with. This hinge type let me use it into two different ways to get what I wanted.

    The next bit was to work out how I'd set the hinges to work so that the door lifted out and cleared the column end posts and column end caps. After a few hours of trial and error I worked out the jig setup to route the hinges and could begin. Below is a trial run.

    IMG_8080.jpg IMG_8083.jpg

    Happy with this, the next bit was to route the door. And as you can see things nicely aligned from the door to the carcass.

    IMG_8120.jpg IMG_8119.jpg


    Next with my off-sider to help it was onto routing on the inside of the front door so that it would be inset into the clock carcass.

    IMG_8129.jpgIMG_8130.jpg

    The holes in the hinges for the screws were of a diameter that they'd only accept 4g screws, and the only 4g screws I could get in from Screw it Screws (I really like their Robertson Screws) was a shank of 10mm. Which when you ad the door weight with glass I wasn't sure or not that 4g 10mm would be enough, so I drilled out the hinge holes to accept 6g.

    IMG_8195.jpg

    The next step was to do a test run of the hinges fitted to the door and see that it opened with clearance from the column end posts and column end caps. In the third shot below you can see the door almost kisses the column end post and caps.

    IMG_8199.jpg IMG_8198.jpg IMG_8196.jpg

    What you don't see in the first photo above is the top column end posts and the top end column caps. I've blued in the bottom pairs so I knew what I was working with as I worked out the door.

    When I measured the door to each side of the carcass edge I was 3mm out to one side. So to fix it I need to pack the door 3mm of from the hinge and that is th next thing to do this Saturday and also position the top end column posts and top column posts.

    In my next post I'll go into the detail of the side doors.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  10. #114
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default The side doors (part 1)

    I've had these done for about a month now, so it's about time I put the details of the side doors up.

    It took a heck of a lot of research to find just what I wanted, or enough to have something to base the insert for the doors off. Like many parts of this build, I looked at hours of Youtube videos about grandfather clocks and I saw some things I hated because they seemed too simple or just didn't fit with the style I was looking for, and finally I found something. The something that I was looking for was for a style of door insert that had a musical feel about it. So when I found it, I then jumped into adobe Illustrator to draw out what I wanted, the result is below.

    IMG_7953.jpg

    This was going to be a first for me using a fret saw, and I think this took three goes before I was happy with the first insert panel. 1 down and 1 more to go with a dry fit to see how things look.

    IMG_7986.jpg

    Just as I always do when I have floating panels in doors, on the inside of each rail and stile I hot glue a piece of fly screen rubber to reduce the insert from flopping all around the place.

    IMG_7987.jpg

    Doors glued up.

    IMG_7988.jpg

    (this has taken me over 30 ins so far to do this much, I'll come back later when someone has kicked the forum in the goolies and things are faster to upload)
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  11. #115
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In the shed, Melbourne
    Age
    51
    Posts
    6,862

    Default The doors (part 2)

    Once the doors were glued up and trimmed, the next stage was to route doors to accept the hinges and the locks.

    I like repeatability and given I'm doing two doors here and I'll likely be using this style of hinge later for another build in the future sometime, I like to make jigs for routing and they make my life easier.

    IMG_8190.jpg

    As always, the locks, just like the hinges are from Grahame Brown Antiques in Malvern, VIC. Here I'm using their lock, Lock Brass, U.K. plate size 38mm x 20mm.

    IMG_8191.jpg

    When I'd routered the door to receive the hinges and had router the edge profiles I found that my 4g 10mm screws just peeked a tiny bit through to the front face of the door, and so thinking what to use as a shim I glued 2 .5mm pieces of copper plate. While they look pretty and won't ever be seen again, they do the job just nicely.
    I included in the shot the glue I use when I'm gluing metal of most any type. It's 20+ years old and came from my late Dad's shed. I'm glad I had the foresight to grab it as it's been so useful over the years and holds strong, even outside in the weather.

    IMG_8194.jpg

    What I hadn't yet gone into for the doors here, or previously for the main door, was that instead of using 3/4" stock I used 1" stock so that the door sat within the carcass of the clock and it also gave me the ability to have the doors built so they overlapped the carcass to stop dust etc. from entering into the g/father clock.

    Final shot for this update is with the one of the doors fitted to see how things look.

    IMG_8193.jpg

    Next update will cover the top end column posts, top end end column caps and an extra bit of moulding I'd added.
    I make things, I just take a long time.

    www.brandhouse.net.au

  12. #116
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    52
    Posts
    8,872

    Default

    Looking amazing Waldo. This is one impressive piece of work.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  13. #117
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Well done Waldo, you've done an amazing job so far.

  14. #118
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,935

    Default

    Looking forward to seeing it put together.
    Regards,
    Bob

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

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