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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default BETH -Skippy- Building a wooden sailing canoe in Tasmania

    Hi,
    the first movements are finally stirring in my boat building garage. The construction of my Beth Sailing Canoe, Skippy will be documented at: http://www.boating.lveska.com
    I have already gathered so much useful information from this forum.

    Laurie

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    805

    Default

    WOW! Great! Another Beth in the World!

    Keep posting your photos here - please! (It's so easy by "[img]image url[/img]")

    For example:
    Aloha!
    Robert Hoffman
    http://robhosailor.blogspot.com/


  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thanks Robert,

    I have enjoyed your posts and have collected many of your construction photos. I hope to start cutting out the side panels tomorrow, will provide links to photos as you describe.
    Cheers,

    Laurie.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default

    A little background on my choice of a Michael Storer 'Beth' Sailing Canoe.

    I have owned several trailer-able boats from 25' down to my current 15' Navigator. Small is better in my view. The Navigator is now my 'big' family boat.. My functional requirements are for a vessel:

    • one person could launch and retrieve using a hand trolley
    • one person could lift and carry for a short distance
    • one person could self-propel
    • that was fun to sail
    • that was easily reefed (more on this later)
    • that could also accommodate a child at times
    • that was relatively easy and cheap to build
    • that looked good (in a Bolger-esque kind of way)
    • that was suitable for its intended waters

    I believe Beth meets most of these criteria, time will tell.

    I also own some plastic canoes, they are fun and bullet-proof, but slow and lethargic. I understand that Beth is high performance in design, and quite tippy, I plan to tame her somewhat using reefing, and possibly using a roller reefing drum on the boom as per Matt Layden's Paradox or Enigma system (I own plans for Paradox). I will discuss this with Michael first - it is very naughty straying from the plans.

    I plan to use the sailing canoe mostly in the Lewisham/Dodges Ferry area of southern Tasmania, Australia (see link below). Good access is available in all but the worst weather to the open sea via Tiger Head. Within the Pittwater area inside Tiger Head, conditions are generally very sheltered, strong North-Westerlies can stir things up quite a bit though. This area is very tidal with lots of sandbars and shallows to negotiate, I will have to look after Beth's beautifully designed foils very carefully.

    Dodges Ferry - Google Maps

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hunter Valley NSW
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,759

    Default

    Awesome part of the world and should be great for sailing your Beth. We nearly bought a block of land on waterfront near Dunalley a couple of years ago, so I know the general area.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tortured_ply View Post

    • one person could launch and retrieve using a hand trolley
    • one person could lift and carry for a short distance
    • one person could self-propel
    • that was fun to sail
    • that was easily reefed (more on this later)
    • that could also accommodate a child at times
    • that was relatively easy and cheap to build
    • that looked good (in a Bolger-esque kind of way)
    • that was suitable for its intended waters

    I believe Beth meets most of these criteria, time will tell.

    I also own some plastic canoes, they are fun and bullet-proof, but slow and lethargic. I understand that Beth is high performance in design, and quite tippy, I plan to tame her somewhat using reefing, and possibly using a roller reefing drum on the boom as per Matt Layden's Paradox or Enigma system (I own plans for Paradox). I will discuss this with Michael first - it is very naughty straying from the plans.
    Laurie,

    I think - probably Beth meets most of your criteria

    About quick reefing: I think you (and I as well) need to reef if you expect than wind could be to srong for you - before the start a daysailing. We (you and me) needs to carefully watching of forecasts. Every wind's violant increasing can to be danger for small canoe an her skipper (over 15 kn. and 20 kn is really gale for us - and it's a sailing time for extreme experienced canoe sailors ). Beth has relatively big sail area (as a racing boat as well!!!) - most of known by me touring sailing canoes, with similar dimensions, have 5,0 - 6,5 (max!) sqm of sail area - than we need to reef earlier then other ones. I'm preparing of simple quick reefing system - clams on booms for reeflines and I intend to reef a mainsail by dropping it into a cockpit, taking reef nad hoisting it again (by MIK's advice).

    ___
    PS: Hoping to launch my Beth "YuanFen" next week and check out of described above
    Aloha!
    Robert Hoffman
    http://robhosailor.blogspot.com/


  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robhosailor View Post
    /.../ and 20 kn is really gale for us - and it's a sailing time for extreme experienced canoe sailors ).
    There is a Beaufort's scale for canoe sailors

    Canoe Sailing Magazine - A Beaufort Wind-Scale for Canoe-Sailors

    Enjoy
    Aloha!
    Robert Hoffman
    http://robhosailor.blogspot.com/


  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    8,138

    Default

    Welcome Laurie!

    Will be indeed nice to have another Beth around.

    The mizzen will seldom need reefing and as Robert has passed on I found it easier just to drop the mainsail completely and reef it then rehoist. I suspect most of the roller reefing systems to result in a pretty poor sail shape.

    Best wishes
    Michael

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thanks Michael,
    I will probably stay with the sails as per the plans. Can't help myself from pondering "what ifs" though.

    Gee, block planes are a pleasure to use, I want more planes! First time I have used a Japanese Pull Saw, it cuts easier, truer and faster than I am prepared to go! Who needs power tools with 4mm ply?




  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    'Delaide, Australia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    8,138

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Rockhampton, Australia
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Who needs power tools with 4mm ply?

    Well lets see when you come to sanding down all that epoxy coating.. HEHEHE. I think a ROS is the #1 essential power tool!

    Have fun!
    Nick

    Fair Winds and Following Seas
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    PD Racer #276 - "Duck's Nuts" - Oz MkII with Lug rig
    Storer Eureka 155 - unnamed

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default Some more progress

    A little more progress on my Beth to report. A certain course of events conspired to reduce my building time over the last 6 months...


    I am about to glue the sides to the bottom. I ended up using rounded-over internal chine logs partly to reduce weight, but also I like the look. It will make fitting the bulkheads and knees a little more difficult, but it should be OK.



    Wood used for the internal chine log is treated pine - ripped lengthwise from a long piece of decking, then rounded over with a router bit. Treated pine is a good boat building wood in my opinion in that it is cheap, light, strong (if chosen carefully), readily available (at least in my locale) and very resistant to rot. It is much more flexible than the equivalent untreated pine such as Radiata which makes it great for bending around tight radii. My Navigator has internal stringers etc of treated pine too.



    Next step is to make the bow and stern posts.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tortured_ply View Post
    A little more progress on my Beth to report.
    WOW! They looks great! (baby and boat also)

    I'm waiting for progress (and launching day) with impatience!

    Photos and video for incentives:





    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkKDzQdo7sA"]YouTube - Sailing canoe BETH -YuanFen- Dziekanowskie Lake (Poland)[/ame]
    Aloha!
    Robert Hoffman
    http://robhosailor.blogspot.com/


  15. #14
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default bulkheads are up

    I have taken a week off work during the school holidays, and in amongst helping to keep the kids entertained, I have also managed some more Beth construction:



    Centrecase is installed now.


  16. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Age
    65
    Posts
    805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tortured_ply View Post
    I have taken a week off work during the school holidays, and in amongst helping to keep the kids entertained, I have also managed some more Beth construction:
    /.../
    Centrecase is installed now.
    Really happy to see another BETH in 3D!!!

    I can see some differences in centreboard installation process or not?

    Probably not. Your centrecase is not glued on place - it is a fit before glueing. I can not see notches in bulkheads for centrecase's bedlogs etc.:


    Centrecaseandknees02 by robhosailor, on Flickr
    Aloha!
    Robert Hoffman
    http://robhosailor.blogspot.com/


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