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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boatmik View Post
    Howdy Richard,

    The bonding area of a cleat (ie piece of timber that holds two pieces of ply together in a corner) has to be three times the smaller of the ply thicknesses in the join.

    So your ply is 6mm and 3 x 6mm = 18mm

    So the stock size of 19mm is the closest.
    You come up with the most boring reasons for doing things

    Richard

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  3. #62
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    'Delaide, Australia
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  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boatmik View Post
    I never promised you a rose garden!

    MIK
    Yes you did, with fourteen varieties and extra blooms in winter, but I got lucky and you mistakenly sent me the plans for a boat instead

    Speaking of said boat, I glued the framework onto bulkheads 1 and 2 this afternoon. Note to self: don't wear your good jeans when playing with epoxy

    Richard

  5. #64
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    Jan 2009
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    São Paulo, Brazil
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post
    I remember reading a story about a bloke who built a boat in the lounge room of hos single bedroom apartment ... on the first floor ... that he was renting!

    Doesn't look like I'm getting to the boat today - the lass had over 2 hours at the playground, add travelling time to that plus what else I had to do and now it's nearly time to take the lad to soccer training

    At least I had a good read of the plans - that blank page still makes sense

    Richard
    That´s nothing - my first attempt at boat building back in the 80s was a Mirror Dinghy constructed in my living room in my flat on the 17th floor of my apartment block (here in São Paulo). I hardly spoke Portuguese at the time and my secretary got some strange silences on the phone when she was trying to find a moving company to get it out. Ended up being hoisted down the side of the block by a piano-moving company. Got some even stranger looks from my neighbours as it inched its way down past their windows. Sailed it on the coast here for a while (lots of fun) and now it is with my brother in the south of France. A well-travelled Mirror - and still holding together, with that little built-in hull twist from not setting it up properly when fibreglassing the seams. My GIS hull will be levelled with a laser, come the time!

  6. #65
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    I hope the laser and "levelling" the GIS means the laser is non destructive.

    I think the lasers in Star Wars are very good at levelling the enemy!

    MIK

  7. #66
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    No, I haven't forgotten her. Been dickering around sticking sticks to bulkheads and waving sharp tools at defenceless constructs of timber and hope.

    Bulkheads 1 and 2 are now complete - frames fitted, bevells planed and edges rounded with my wee trimmer/router.

    Yes Mik, I know I don't have to round off the frames inside the tanks but it's giving me good practice with the router. Unfortunately, the biggest tool I've got puts only a modest curve on the frame so this is all about neatness, not weight reduction.

    I must have fluked a good edge on my plane last time I sharpened it because I was able to plane across the end grain of frames quite easily

    Now a bit of one-up-man-ship. Mik's often bragged about his belt sander. Well, I was holding Bulkhead 2 - it's surrounded by 19mm square frames and on this bulkhead, they're all on the same side. Naturally, there were tiny lips where the frames butted against each other, and some rough timber and some epoxy smears. She just needed a bit of light cleaning up ... so I fed her through the thicknesser Two gentle passes and she cleaned up nicel

    There are photos but I don't feel like uploading them and posting them at this point **pokes out tongue**

    I spent much of today digging through my sack of recycled timber. Sadly, it's unsuitable as most of it has a density just the wrong side of cast iron It seems I'm going to have to go to the timber shop and actually PAY for my timber

    Off to St Kilda tomorrow for fun and games with the lass on the adventure playground. This'd be a good trip except that it's on the other side of the city to me - about 2 hours just to get to a playground. At least the lad doesn't have a soccer match so I don't have to be up at sparrow fart and there's a nice marina there and a walk through the mangroves and a tram museum. Sadly, I can't take a boat but I'm sure we'll have fun anyway.

    Richard

  8. #67
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  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boatmik View Post
    The mouse boat is really easy to take Richard!

    MIK
    I was tempted and was glad I didn't. Big low tide the whole time we were there, the only thing that had any water in it was the channel from the ramp to the open gulf.

    The rowboat should be good for that sort of area though - floats on a puddle, no noisy motors to upset people, able to poke around in strange places. Pity it's so far away. Although no worse than driving up to Clayton (where there isn't any water anyway), the trip through the city makes it seem longer than it is.

    Richard

  10. #69
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    Out in the shed/back yard again today, enjoying the good weather ... and trying to forget that I am now back on the unemployment list

    Still mucking about with bulkheads. I've got some old lumps of oregon that came out of a roof somewhere. They look pretty horrible but once you assault them with table saw (Triton) and thicknesser, I was able to get some usuable bits of framing material - one of the advantages of only need really short bits is that you can pick the good bits out of an otherwise horrible stick.

    The extra wide frame needed along the top of the transom will come courtesy of what looks like a lump of old sofa, but rather than being the cast iron substitute that is the rest of that stack, this is a nice, lightish soft wood.

    And, seeing I was using the 'big tools' out on the lawn, I was able to indulge in one of the more bizarre aspects of boat building - vacuuming the lawn I've got a Triton dust bucket hooked up to Mum and Dad's old vacuum cleaner and that does a ripper job of cleaning up, even the lawn

    Richard

  11. #70
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    Hmm......good and bad news, stick with it on both fronts.

    Mike

  12. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post
    Out in the shed/back yard again today, enjoying the good weather ... and trying to forget that I am now back on the unemployment list
    Richard
    Good that you're getting stuck in...I'm sure you'll look back one day at all the good stuff you achieved while you were 'between jobs'. Being able to make things is such a blessing I think.

  13. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by m2c1Iw View Post
    Hmm......good and bad news, stick with it on both fronts.

    Mike
    Quote Originally Posted by rob540 View Post
    Good that you're getting stuck in...I'm sure you'll look back one day at all the good stuff you achieved while you were 'between jobs'. Being able to make things is such a blessing I think.
    Thanks.

    Richard

  14. #73
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    Spent large parts of the day cutting frames then gluing them to the bulkheads. I made the mistake of trying to do too many in one hit which led to a sort of rushed job, especially as I had to take the lad to a meeting at school (sorting out his year 12 subjects for next year). I'll clean them up tomorrow and then might take some photos.

    This arvo was spent assaulting huge planks of timber of undetermined species but which appears to be one of the pines (they used to be the ends of a bed base that Dad made me out of timber he himself had rescued from somewhere). Gradually, these two planks became six pieces of 31x19mm for the chine logs. They're only about 5' long and full of screw holes so I have to scarph three bits together to get one chine log. I made a start on the scarphs but had to stop to take the lad to soccer training.

    No photos ... yet (aren't you lucky)

    Richard

  15. #74
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    Had a lazy day today but did get out to the shed to achieve things, specifically, the chine logs.

    My chine logs (31x19 mm) are made out of 6' lengths but seeing the logs are 15' long, I needed to scarf them together, two joins to each log.

    First job - cut the scarfs. Easy enough to do with a sharp plane. I don't know why people make such a fuss about them, especially all the stuffing about making fancy jigs and the like. Not needed. I simply marked either side of the stick, clamped it in the vice and planed it down. Well under five minutes for each scarf so doing the eight needed wasn't a chore, more of a pleasure actually because I enjoy working with the plane.

    You can see my method of clamping in the photos. The side blocks were cut from the same sticks used for the logs, deliberately so both for thickness and to have the same width. The big problem with scarf joints is that the sticks like to slide down the angled face of the joint and it's easy to misalign the two sticks making the joint either too fat or too thin.

    This is my method.
    - Prime both sides of the joint with unthickened epoxy. This is end grain remember and will soak up the epoxy - if you put thickened epoxy on one, you run the risk of a dry joint, so unthickened epoxy on both faces to be joined.
    - Let that sit for a bit. Mik talks about 5 mins but I just went and mixed my next batch of epoxy and left it at that.
    - You want to make this batch fairly thick, the old peanut butter consistancy. There's still a fair bit of unthickened epoxy on the end grain of the timber and this will thin out your mix.
    - Slather a goodly amount on one side of the cut. Be generous because the excess will be squeezed out and you don't want your joint to have gaps.
    - Put the two sticks together, overlapping more than they have to.
    - Place the two side blocks in place - these had been covered with packing tape so they don't get glued in place.
    - Using a quick clamp (one of those that closes up as you squeeze the handle), clamp OVER the joint. The two sticks will slide over each other (wet epoxy is like grease). Because the side blocks are so thick, they won't bend under the clamp and will grip on the two sticks so once the clamp is pulled firm (not tight), you have the two sticks held in exactly the right position.
    - Clamp the assembly together, either side of the joint, then remove the central clamp.
    - Check that the assembly is straight and the sides of the joint flush. On one of mine, the sticks had moved sideways slightly. Rather than undo the clamps and start again, I just gave the high stick a whack with the hammer and the joint was perfect.

    The beauty of this method is that side blocks are clamped hard to the main part of each stick with the only pressure on the joint coming from the side blocks. Because the sticks are clamped, the sticks can not move apart opening the joint and you don't have any excess pressure on the joint to force it apart. The thick side blocks, clamped to the sticks, automatically place the two sticks in exactly the right spot, all you have to do is make sure the whole assembly is straight and the exposed edges flush with each other.

    Clear as mud? My old brain isn't working well this afternoon so my descriptive powers aren't what they should be. Anyway, have a look at the pictures, they should make things obvious.

    Richard

  16. #75
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    Cool, thanks Richard I'm about to do the same thing good system

    Pity we didn't get out in the boats today a wee bit breezy at times but on the hole a great day for boating..........and boat building.

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