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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobWes View Post
    So, your 31 x 19 chine logs gave you grief while fitting them into place?
    Not 'grief' but I was aware I was playing with them, this isn't like bending a batten around some nails.

    A trick I've used in the past with gunwales and inwales, is to use a long clamp to pull the recalcitrant bugger into place and then drive home whatever fastener/clamp you're using to hold it there.

    The goat and the rowboat are close cousins so I expect your side panel will be similar to mine - there's no real problem I don't think but you will have to work carefully and with sympathy for the timber. There've been a lot of goats built and if this was a problem, it'd have been sorted by now so I suspect it's more scary than difficult (and yes, I looked sideways at that big lump of wood before I tried to bend it).

    Yes, panic is good - keeps the arteries open and provides opportunities to fine tune the fluency of your swearing.

    Richard

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  3. #92
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    Depending on confidence levels ... I really recommend dry fitting more complex assemblies.

    I think it is not really needed for something as simple as chine logs unless you are unsure whether you have enough clamps.

    That is one of the the advantages of the screws - they come in free abundance. If the glue is mixed and you get it out on the surfaces before spreading neatly you will have between 20 to 40 minutes to get it all set up at this time in Adelaide.

    I always like to work on the flat where possible - I think that is a bit limited for Daddles because not much floor is showing in his shed. Risk with too few supports is that you might glue a bit of curve into some areas unless you put a piece of wood under the ply along the tops of the horses. Whoa Nellie!

    MIK

  4. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boatmik View Post
    I always like to work on the flat where possible - I think that is a bit limited for Daddles because not much floor is showing in his shed. Risk with too few supports is that you might glue a bit of curve into some areas unless you put a piece of wood under the ply along the tops of the horses. Whoa Nellie!

    MIK
    Thanks for that, I hadn't even thought of it and now I've got ANOTHER thing to panic about Ah well, at least it'll be saggin in the right direction.

    Mik, with the glue application. I haven't used your glue in the bag trick yet, but is this an area where it'd make life a lot easier? Using a stick is a lot of mucking about though it has the advantage that you can spread it evenly over the log and yes, I was surprised at how much glue went into this joint.

    Richard

  5. #94
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    Mik and Richard,

    Thanks for the tips. This has been helpful.

    I can see where working on the floor or otherwise supporting the hull panels makes sense. I'll keep that in mind as I am more likely to use sawhorses than the floor.

    Dry fitting is a given (didn't mean to omit it in previous posts). So, get the chine log in place and pencil its position on the panel as a reference for gluing?

    Using the goo in a bag trick probably would be a good choice for getting the goo onto the joint; then smear it around with a stick. Considering the 10mm overhang seems to make sense to put the goo on the hull panel (pre-coating the panel and the chine log with straight epoxy). I need to practice that baggie trick though, the one time I tried it the goo was too thick or the hole in the bag was too small or some combination thereof.

    Bob

  6. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobWes View Post
    Considering the 10mm overhang seems to make sense to put the goo on the hull panel (pre-coating the panel and the chine log with straight epoxy).
    In this case, I prefer to precoat the ply because you'll get more soakage on that than the log.

    Now, should I be brave, go out into the shed, remove the clamps and see what sort of mess I've made of the job?

    Richard

  7. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post

    Now, should I be brave, go out into the shed, remove the clamps and see what sort of mess I've made of the job?

    Richard
    Go for it... Take the camera... Post the pics!

    Bob

  8. #97
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    After removing the clamps, the first chine log chose to remain glued to the side of the boat

    Hey Mik, the chine logs go on the INSIDE of the boat don't they?

    Just joking, all's fine ... so I glued the other chine log on Man, they really stiffen up the side don't they.

    Richard

  9. #98
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    Yeah, but what about the pics? We like pics, and we need proof that you really took the clamps off.
    What caused the Pacific War? A book to read: here

    http://middlething.blogspot.com/

  10. #99
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    Two sides with chine logs fitted. The more observant will note that I have made a left side and a right side (not port or starboard until assembled into a boat methinks) and that I have both the chine log and the butt strap on the inside of the boat

    What you can't see, because I did it after taking the photo, is that I've marked up the positions of the bulkheads and have run the trimmer router over the chine logs to round off the inside edge.

    Next step, mark up the inwales (perhaps) and mask up the impending glue joints all ready to coat the whole thing with epoxy tomorrow. Why tomorrow? Because three coats wet on wet is going to take me all day and it's now after lunch.

    Why do the precoating now? Because I'll have to coat the chine logs and it makes sense (to me anyway) to do the inside AND the chine log at the same time.

    Which leads to a question for Mik - you've been buggering around with the sheer line haven't you, so I don't know where the inwales are going to land do I, and I'll be doing open inwales so I need to allow for the bits that'll remain open so ... maybe the smart move is to coat where the inwales will be glued anyway (ie, not mask them off) and just make sure it's sanded well. Maybe?

    Richard

  11. #100
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    Finally! A pic!

    Looks grand. A left and a right side - and the chine logs and butt joints are where they ought to be! Does it get any better than that?

    I am planning to precoat my hull panels (whenever it is I actually cut them out...) and I just figure on sanding when it comes time to install the inwales and gunwales as well (although I may be able to mask off for the gunwale).

    I find I have to move stuff around, too. Sometimes I need to move the recliner so I can get to the patio!

    Bob

  12. #101
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    Don't wish to interrupt the flow, but I've just spent some time on this page: http://www.storerboatplans.com/Rowboat/Rowboat.html
    because I've stupidly been following this thread without knowing much about the design, and thought there may be other readers who stumble here in equal ignorance (it is possible)...it's a great story in the design development, and worth checking Mik's site.
    What caused the Pacific War? A book to read: here

    http://middlething.blogspot.com/

  13. #102
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    The daft thing about the story is this: Mik designs a boat for Peter and I. Peter gets started on the prototype, then falls over and buggers up a shoulder and is out of boat building. Meanwhile, cycling and uni put me out of boat building. Then along comes this yank who's got nothing to do with the original flurry of emails and gets the first one built by a mob of kids (g'day Clint ). At least I've finally made a start on mine. There are a few others around the place too.

    Richard

  14. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddles View Post
    Two sides with chine logs fitted. The more observant will note that I have made a left side and a right side (not port or starboard until assembled into a boat methinks) and that I have both the chine log and the butt strap on the inside of the boat
    A cunning plan not involving rats, methinks.

    Which leads to a question for Mik - you've been buggering around with the sheer line haven't you, so I don't know where the inwales are going to land do I, and I'll be doing open inwales so I need to allow for the bits that'll remain open so ... maybe the smart move is to coat where the inwales will be glued anyway (ie, not mask them off) and just make sure it's sanded well. Maybe?
    The new gunwale line is less than 6mm away from the original gunwale line. I have a drawing that is now added to the plan - basically a new set of points for the underside of the gunwale to be checked with further eyeballing.

    Give me a grumpy yell if I have not posted it here by the end of tomorrow.

    MIK

  15. #104
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    Thanks Mik. It's really only a problem if it affects what I mask off when coating the inside of the hull sides. I plan to coat them tomorrow (wed) and at the moment, am thinking I'll coat under where the inwales will be glued and rely on a good sanding to give the epoxy enough grip to hold the inwales - the bulkhead joins have been masked and, of course, the chine logs are already in place. The only other things to glue to the sides are the seat supports and once again, I'll rely on a good sanding of the coated surface.

    Richard

  16. #105
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    First coat of epoxy on the sides. Like PAR, I'm a squeegee man and have a lovely one made out of 2mm plastic - stiff and the glue doesn't stick to it so you can clean it up afterwards. Slop a puddle onto the panel, spread it everywhere with the squeegee (and doesn't it go a looooooonnnnnnnngggggg way when doing that), use the roller to get it even then tip off with a finger stopping the roller from rolling. Quick and easy ... now I've got to wait patiently while it gets tacky.

    Tip to the novices: the side of a boat looks really big, but don't make any more than a three pump or two pump mix to start with. Yes, you will have to make more but you'll be amazed at how far it goes when spreading it with a squeegee and/or roller

    Richard

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