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  1. #3271
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    How much does the roof weigh?

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  3. #3272
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    Blaxland, Australia
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    Hi Sumbloak,

    It weighs far too much.

    On the other hand, all that needs to be done is to lift the thing off and put it down next to the trailer when departing to go sailing; and reversing the procedure when home. The handling time is therefore at a minimum.

    Taking some good advice that I was given early on in the "design" stage from pindimar (Bolger and Michalak boat builder) and using Colorbond for the roof panels would have reduced the weight considerably. But when do I ever listen to advice?

    Cheers,
    Alex

  4. #3273
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    Default Hooray! Roof is done! Complete! Finished! Hooray!

    I've just finished the second and last top-coat, so the final milestone has been reached! Well, final except for getting the thing out of the workswamp and down to where the boat is supposed to live without too much damage.

    1. First top-coat, ROS-sanded: 320-grit paint disc used; the ridge cap was done by hand with 240-grit sandpaper





    2. Rather moth-eaten after the sanding, even though I was careful and kept the pressure as light as possible





    3. Close-up of a heavy-handed piece of sanding. At least it's smooth ;)





    4. Last coat on! Hooray!





    5. Last coat, viewed from the other side :)





    6. Close-up of last coat. I still got a cascade of hairs plus roller fluff, but it's done and that's all I'm worried about. Once the paint has hardened sufficiently the thing will get carted outside


    Follow this link to my Flickr account



    Whew! I'm so relieved to have this millstone finished! As soon as I'd finished running around the edge with the soft artist's brush to tidy up, I put the roller in turps to soak, took these snaps, turned the lights off and locked up. I'll just have to be careful not to fairy-heffalump across the living room floor (workswamp ceiling) too much and dislodge (more) dust onto the surface until the paint is touch-dry. Given the warm - and very windy - day with low outside RH (24 %), that may be close to the tin's advice (2 hours) than usual (for here).

    No matter what it looks like once the paint has dried, that's it, bar the 'Duckcote's extraction from the workswamp. That still leaves the boat to finish off: that is really just a small amount of varnishing, and I'm not going to go overboard (as it were) over that, either. I must say that the Accursed Roof has put me off building another boat - and almost any other woodworking project (I have one for the Boss that I have to complete) for life. Even if it hadn't, the Boss has seriously threatened the D-word if I so much as even think of building another boat...

  5. #3274
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Lindfield N.S.W.
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    61
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    Do you want a hand this weekend to get stuff out of the workswamp?
    Cheers

    Jeremy
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly

  6. #3275
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    NSW, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexN View Post
    Hi Sumbloak,

    It weighs far too much.

    On the other hand, all that needs to be done is to lift the thing off and put it down next to the trailer when departing to go sailing; and reversing the procedure when home. The handling time is therefore at a minimum.

    Taking some good advice that I was given early on in the "design" stage from pindimar (Bolger and Michalak boat builder) and using Colorbond for the roof panels would have reduced the weight considerably. But when do I ever listen to advice?

    Cheers,
    Alex
    Well, if you particualrly wanted this look and were enjoying the project then that's fine. If you just wanted a functional roof that could be built with minimum effort, the way to do it would be just a basic skillion with 200 mm of fall end to end, sheeted with Colorbond, and using dressed treated pine framing. Colorbond is perfectly waterproof if given a 1 in 12 fall. Even though more is recommended these days, a lot of the older roofs have been fine for decades with 1 in 12.

    Two longitudinal 4x2's with four cross pieces at roughly 800 centres. Fix it together with standard exterior batten screws (16 in total) and screw the iron on (about 80 screws). Hey presto, one roof. Painted framing optional.

  7. #3276
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    178

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    Nice job Alex. It looks great. No doubt the bush turkeys will appreciate a drier location to roost under your new roof! I'm now keen to see the boat getting its final fixes completed. Summer is coming down under, right?

  8. #3277
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmk89 View Post
    Do you want a hand this weekend to get stuff out of the workswamp?
    Hi jmk,

    Many thanks for the kind offer - I accept :). Probably next weekend as I still have to move the turkey mound and clear a path through the workswamp large enough to move the roof out...

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  9. #3278
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    Jan 2009
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    Blaxland, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sumbloak View Post
    Well, if you particualrly wanted this look and were enjoying the project then that's fine. If you just wanted a functional roof that could be built with minimum effort, the way to do it would be just a basic skillion with 200 mm of fall end to end, sheeted with Colorbond, and using dressed treated pine framing. Colorbond is perfectly waterproof if given a 1 in 12 fall. Even though more is recommended these days, a lot of the older roofs have been fine for decades with 1 in 12.

    Two longitudinal 4x2's with four cross pieces at roughly 800 centres. Fix it together with standard exterior batten screws (16 in total) and screw the iron on (about 80 screws). Hey presto, one roof. Painted framing optional.
    Hi Sumbloak,

    The thing doesn't just need to shed water: it also has to - as I have commented on before - deflect falling branches of varying thickness/weight. And in any case a bit lat now ;). Thanks for the (belated ;) input, though.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  10. #3279
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    Jan 2009
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    Blaxland, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theodor View Post
    Nice job Alex. It looks great. No doubt the bush turkeys will appreciate a drier location to roost under your new roof! I'm now keen to see the boat getting its final fixes completed. Summer is coming down under, right?
    Hi Theodor,

    Thank you for your kind words :). The turkosaurs had jolly well better not roost in it, or Truly Terrible Things(TM) will happen to them ;). They are currently sauntering around on the top of the roof of the house in the early morning, upsetting the Dreadful Dog quite some considerable and thus waking us all up. Dreadful Dog. Terrible Turkeys.

    I am also quite keen to see the boat repairs complete - and the thing (literally) out from under foot. Some sailing might be nice too.

    As far as summer goes, it appears to be here already this year...

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  11. #3280
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    Sep 2012
    Location
    NSW, Australia
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    I've seen and heard some pretty big branches bounce off Colorbond roofs. It's amazingly resilient.

  12. #3281
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    Jan 2009
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    Blaxland, Australia
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    OK. Here's some snaps of the workswamp:

    1. Going, going... It's still there, but note that I've cleared some room to get the thing out!





    2. Gone!





    3. Even goner ;). Boat has departed...





    4. Even more goner! The floor has been cleared a bit :)


    Follow this link to my Flickr account


    Now I can get on with sorting everything else out :) ...

  13. #3282
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    Here it is: the roof outside and installed:

    1. Roof outside! Hooray! The rubber strips on its feet help prevent it getting scratched up when at rest





    2. Showing off the glossy surface. The end-plates are doing exactly what was intended: supporting the thing while on the ground





    3. Wood Duck back in place on her carriage: it's getting on for two years after her last perch thereon...





    4. Front end of the 'Duckcote. Plenty of room/nice snug fit :). I took the designer's advice and left the primer on the hull unpainted...





    5. View of side-frame on the deck: working exactly as intended :)





    6. Roof ventilation slits in evidence, as is a ratchet tie-down (through the centrecase on both sides of the boat - just in case). interestingly, despite the weight, the whole thing is surprisingly stable - and the boat isn't likely to fill up with water again...





    7. Not-quite-hangar rash: the results of getting bumped while proceeding down the stone steps outside the workswamp. Crunch, crunch, crunch, crunch...





    8. Close-up of another bit of chipping. Ouch. Nothing that a small paintbrush and some paint won't partially disguise, though ;)





    9. Rear end of the roof/stern of boat





    10. 6 mm or so clearance above the upper rudder gudgeon. Whew!





    11. View of 'Duckcote from directly in front. Maybe some pardalotes or wrens will move in ;). I think I saw a bird eyeing it off as a prospective dwelling this morning....


    Follow this link to my Flickr account



    Well, that's it for the roof, thank goodness. I'll polish off the final bit of vanishing on the boat (foredeck) at my leisure. The priority now is to get the workswamp cleaned up, sorted out and operational, and the mill working. As for the boat-building, I've used up all the resin, so even if I hadn't decided to quite while I'm not ahead, I wouldn't be able to do anything of that nature in any case.

    I may post some snaps of the boat's re-launch in due course.

  14. #3283
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    The birds will love that. And the wasps. And the spiders. Maybe a bit of mesh on the inside of the holes would be worthwhile.

    Looks good though.

  15. #3284
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    Hunter Valley NSW
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  16. #3285
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    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sydney
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    Nice job Alex. Do you have a pic of how the roof is lashed down?

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