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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexN View Post
    Hi Jeremy,

    I agree about the bandwidth problem. I tried to use thumbnails but couldn't find the function that does it - possibly only if you're uploading from the HD initially? I've been using files that I have already uploaded into my account. Will investigate.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    There is a how to on attaching as thumbnails in this post. You should be able to upload from your account as well
    Cheers

    Jeremy
    If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done quickly

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  3. #17
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    There's no doubt that I've got the right blade this time: compare & contrast the tapered piece in the middle of the two photos...

    Rough-cut edge:





    Smooth-cut edge:





    Turning off the oscillator helped, too - I'd forgotten that I'd left it on from the last job I used the jigsaw on.

    Still having trouble with the thumbnails. Then again, the forum converts images to around 97 KB on upload, so perhaps it isn't so bad. But still have to find how to do thumbnails anyway...

  4. #18
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    One last snap for the day:

    The permagrit sample sanding sheet.



    Btw, its probably the equivalent of 60 or 40 grit sandpaper - it's got teeth!

    I found a nice ring binder at the newsagent's this arvo - in PD yellow :). I've transferred all the instructions, plans and and my scribbled notes into it so that I don't get things flapping shut as soon as I take my had off them to do something else ;).

  5. #19
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    Enthusiasm is a good thing, but needs to be tempered with patience and care, especially in my case...

    I've moved on to careful cutting out of the parts from sheet # 2 (foredeck as oversized as possible) while I await Michael's comments on the photos of the hull bottom curve between the critical points.

    Working on the bulkheads mean breaking out the longest sanding I've got to trim the edges to line - a 600 mm x 100 mm piece of radiata covered with somewhat worn 60 grit sandpaper.

    And did I hear someone mention tidying the workshop?

  6. #20
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    Whilst tidying up (a bit) I decided to grab a handful of plane blades and re-shape and hone them. Which meant more tidying up, to track down the honing guide: as I've said before, I'm not exactly the world's best blade sharpener, and need all the help I can get!

    The two hull side panels are now gang-sanded to the same identical shape, with a very small amount taken off the original panel to take it to the line:





    Having sliced up sheet # 2, I now have a kit of plywood parts, except for the various bits and pieces for the centrecase frames from sheet # 1, and the step/partner/tow-hook assemblies that come off sheet # 3 after the boat goes 3D:



    When I got the tank side cut out and I was looking (rather too late!) at which sides had the nicest grain patterns, I realised that I should have waited before I slice up the second panel, as the way they are cut, only one side of the two will look great, not two :(. One side of the "wrong" panel is not too bad, so I shouldn't grouse too much. Just a bit annoying. I had at least decided to put the nice grain figure on the cockpit bulkhead (piece at the bottom of phto # 2 above), on the side opposite where the 150 mm inspection port will go...

    I'm having a bad time with the vacuum cleaner hose that's attached to the jigsaw for dust extraction - it keeps snagging on the ply no matter what I do. Every time it snags, the saw gets thrown out its path, resulting in extremely wiggly lines. Fortunately it didn't go too far at any point, but it was a close thing, especially as I was working within 4 mm, not 6. Almost (but not quite) false economy.

    Next step is to shape the duplicated side deck and check that the two decks are fair, after which, it's bulkhead- and cleat-making time! Will have to turn the table saw back into a saw, instead of a table ;).

  7. #21
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    Howdy Alex,

    If the hose is long enough put it around the back of your neck. Then you will feel when it starts pulling and it will be less likely to snag anyhow.

    MIK

  8. #22
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    Hi MIK,

    Thanks for the advice :). I'll try it next time. Unhappily, my old shop vac gave up the ghost last year after a very hard life as a builder's aid, and I'm making do with a domestic barrel type until I can afford a replacement. At least the temp vac doesn't have an integral on/off switch and pipe on the hose: that would have made it impossible to use!

    I realised after I'd looked back at the cutting diagram that there was no way that I could have laid out the parts any other way, so one tank side was always going to be less pretty than the other.

    One more pic - the trimmed and faired side decks, clamped within an inch of their lives ;).





    First time trying out the BoteCote today - interested to see how much its cuing time differs from WEST 105/205. I got the non-yellowing hardener, as at least half of the boat is going to be clear finished. And any left over can be fed to the Goat.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  9. #23
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    This is what I've been up to over the last couple of days, when I haven't been trying to rehabilitate an injured chisel.

    It's the setting up of the jig to produce the chinelogs, and you will no doubt spot the mistake I made straight away. I caught it when trying to put a piece of timber into the jig, i.e., I didn't see it straight away ;). Sorted now, though.

    Here are some (more) photos. The clarity really has improved since I cleaned the lens :). Amazing. Note piece of clean floor!

    1. The beginnings of the chinelog jig - an old door, some shelf brackets, 8 mm dowelling from an old wine rack, and some clear packaging tape. The hull bottom curve is just visible under the tape...





    2. Dowels, brackets and tape...





    3. All the brackets screwed down on the curve. Spot the mistake!





    4. Trial fit of chinelog laminate # 1 onto the jig. The mistake is easier to spot in this photo...





    5. The mistake has been fixed, and I've added another bracket to help out the curve. Will save a bit of planing and sanding later...





    6. A closer look at the mistake's solution. Two sets of chinelogs dry run to test clamps. With extra tape-covered cardboard shims to tweak the accuracy of the logs...





    7. And here's the full array. Some will be switched over to the other side to balance thngs up and help keep the logs square when being glued. Note to AJ - these are the el cheapo quick clamps from Bunnies (Thornleigh, not Mile End ;) -

    .

    The next couple of evenings will probably be devoted to the fixing up of the afore-mentioned chisel, which had had an accidental encounter with a NAIL a while ago, and been put to one side (you know how it is ;). I decided, after reading a good little booklet on sharpening by Ian Kirby (an "American Woodworker" contributor), to go the whole hog and polish the back of the chisel to a mirror finish. Labourious, but it only needs to be done once - at least, theoretically. This is going to take a while as there are still several hollows in the blade back even after much elbow grease. Also working out how to add tape between the chinelog sets without getting the tape crinkled and the whole thing into an awful mess. Maybe a single-edged razor blade, lots of small pieces of tape and my magnifiers.

    Happy that I've got a kit of parts, a bit nervous about committing to glueing: but I always am, even with the model aircraft.

    More anon.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  10. #24
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  11. #25
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    Default Paint quantities

    Hi MIK,

    This is the first time I've ever completely (or even more-or-less completely ;) photographically documented a project from the word "go", so it has been a useful exercise for me in that respect alone. And as a record of what I've done too, of course! I'm happy that it has filled in the odd nook as well (I didn't set out to do that).

    Quick query re paint - how many litres of BoteCote Hi-build Primer and AquaCote for the outside of the hull, and likewise for the clear coat inside the boat? I'm being a bit lazy here and not properly sifting through your building thread (although 2.5 quarts of latex house paint rings a bell).

    I'm hoping you're going "1 litre each", but I suspect you're actually going to say "get 2 litres of each"!

    Cheers,
    Alex.

  12. #26
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    Howdy Alex,

    I generally use conventional paints. At this stage I won't recommend the Aquacote.

    Like most Water based polyurethanes it can be tricky to apply if the humidity is too low. I am aware of boats where painting has gone very nicely down one side and not very well on the other.

    PAR who works in Florida likes the type of product a lot but still pays careful attention to creating enough humidity to make it work reliably - shrouding, hosing the floor and shrouding down or somesuch.

    I have seen some beautiful jobs done with the WB-LPU systems but have seen some pretty crappy ones too. I couldn't find the thread where PAR spells out what he does. It is here somewhere.

    If you are just painting the outside of the boat and varnishing the inside then one litre of topcoat might just be enough - so that means get two litres of paint.

    I would definitely get two litres of undercoat. You can always use any leftovers later. I like the International Brightside topcoats because the paint flattens out so nicely as it dries giving a near sprayed finish from using the right roller and not putting so much paint on that you end up with trails of bubbles everywhere. You could use High build (a two pot) or their Precote (single pot).

    On the original Ducks I think we used a Wattyl or Pascol trade supplied high build which was quite nice to sand.

    If going for the two pot final coat you can get a special brushing thinner that makes good results easier to acheive than using a spraying thinner.

    MIK

  13. #27
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    Hi MIK,

    Thanks for the detailed commentary. Although the workshop under the house is quite humid - I have to run a demudifier to keep my tools from rusting - I suspect that it's not quite that humid, even with the dehumidifier turned off!

    I'll be visiting the nearest Whitworth's (Crow's Nest) in a couple of days for bits and pieces, and will check out the International Brightside then. The tin's logo looks almost the same as that of the "International Marine" paint that I used to use in the '70s... I notice that it "contains Teflon" and is to be used "above the waterline only". Presumably the latter is for boats constantly in the water, not dinghies that spend most of their time out of it.

    On the subject of bits and pieces, gudgeons of a suitable width for the rudder seem somewhat thin on the ground - or businesses aren't bothering to list them. Then again, your build thread shows how to make 'em out of timber, glass and epoxy, and that may well be the way that I will go.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by AlexN; 24th Feb 2009 at 07:56 PM. Reason: sPeelign

  14. #28
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    Another query - I had intended to paint the boat using foam brushes when using AquaCote. Any gotchas using foam with IB paints, or are rollers better than foam brushes anyway? I must confess that I don't like the idea of rollers and avoid spraying paint of any sort unless I can possibly avoid it!

    No work on the Duck this evening - the cold which I thought I'd beaten finally has returned to haunt me.

  15. #29
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    Take it easy Alex, a healthy boatbuilder is a happy boatbuilder! Lots of rest and fresh veggies, OK?!

    To go to the post before ... It is the same International Marine name though it is owned by Azco Nobel these days - it is hard to follow the movements of brand names in the boating area over the past couple of decades. International absorbed Epicraft too .. so now sell the excellent Goldspar varnish (they did try to reformulate it but got slapped down by user criticism!).

    I think it calls itself Interlux in the USA.

    Rollers and paints have come a long way. I would absolutely roll the Brightside if you go that way. The rollers you need are like this and it is important that one end is radiused too as it reduces the overlap marks of the different coats.

    The roller you need are about 150mm wide with a metal frame. They are soft foam with a smalll plastic spindle as the hub. I was not able to find a good pic of the right ones but something similar to this. I would use this size roller for quite large boats too.

    Biggest problem I found in adapting to the Brightside and the roller was lots of little bubbles in the paint - purely because I was putting too much paint on the roller. You get the hang pretty quickly but start with the bottom of the boat because it has so much area that the paint can be spread out to get rid of the bubbles easily. By the time you do half the bottom you will have the hang of how much.

    Before brightside and its nice flattening of the surface as it dries (the undercoat had better be sanded smooth of course!) I would alway paint by rolling and tipping off with a brush - also I knew just how much thinners to add. But Brightside works best straight out of the tin with the roller type as shown.

    I would use a roller and tipping off on most other paints still.

    With the Aquacote, I have no idea what is best. Check with the agents. Also check with them about thinning.

    Michael

  16. #30
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    Hi MIK,

    Thanks once again for the very useful advice :). Shall sleep on it.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

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