Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    6

    Default Rifle stock restoration

    Yes, I know, another thread on rifle stocks! (I did read the others)

    I'm restoring a Savage 250-3000 from the 1930's (I think). Metalwork is done - now the woodwork.

    Can anybody recommend some articles or books that will help me with this? In particular with:

    # Stripping old gunky varnish. How and what to use so I don't damage the wood. (other than sanding)

    # Checkering - do's and don'ts. Currently in good condition, but I need to strip oil/varnish.

    # What other 'classic' finishes are available if I don't go the Tru-Oil route? (Another poster mentioned that Tru-Oil is actually not a true oil, but rather a poly-something with linseed oil?)

    Thanks
    Philip

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Jimboomba Qld.
    Age
    65
    Posts
    594

    Default

    Mentholated spirits or DAA and steel wool should do the job of cleaning. Start at #2 finish with 0000

    Depending on how true you wish to restore it should denote the finish you use I would think.

    Cheers


    Steve
    Discover your Passion and Patience follows.
    www.fineboxes.com.au

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lambton, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    4,959

    Default

    Tool bagshas the goods on cleaning up. If it was rifle stock, after all the finishes I have used over the years I would go a Sam Maloof Danish Oil. I mix my own 30% Estapol/ polyurethane, 30% Tung oil (I use one with driers already in it) and 30% Boiled Linseed. Fast fool proof and very effective. I have been using it outdoors with huge success also. Put a coat on leave it for 15min and rub off, leave it for a day and do it again, two to three coats should be heaps. I have used an old tooth brush with metho to clean my checkering previously. Good luck
    Instagram: mark_aylward
    www.solidwoodfurniture.com.au


    A good edge takes a little sweat!!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,915

    Default

    Avoid sanding the checkered areas as you will flatten the points if it is cut checkering - pressed checkering usually has softer points - stick with the toothbrush idea and avoid sanding checkering as much as possible. If the checkering is poor it may pay to recut it but not really recommended unless you really know what you are doing and have the correct tools.

    When sanding - be very careful where there are square edges eg buttplate - if care is not taken in these areas the job will end up looking very ordinary indeed.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. I have heard of ‘Danish Oil’ before. Will see if I can get some info on that. I'm after a satin finish - not to glossy. I will do the stripping with the toothbrush on the checkering and see what it looks like afterwards. If it’s not good, I’ll ask for some more advice on cutting checkering . Would still like to get hold of a book with some step by step pointers…?

    This will be a long term project, so you might hear from me again much later…

    Cheers
    Philip

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Mildura
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I will leave the stripping to those who would better then myself; but years ago in my mad gun days I used linseed oil on gun stocks. The oil was rubbed in with the hand palm and it left a soft glow finish. But it's a lot of rubbing.

    You may already know this: to get the best sanded finish; sand with very very fine sand paper (with the grain) and wipe the stock with a damp rag to raise the grain; sand again; wipe with damp rag; and do it again and again until the finish is the same after the damp wipe; now you can start with the linseed oil.

    Checking: don't sand the checking anymore then you have to. You can buy hand checking tools or make one from a small triangle file. You need to bend it.

    Sorry; i have been out of the guns for too long to know any books but mr google would know

    The savage 25 was a great and under rated fire arm.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    2,646

    Default

    I did an old lithgow some years ago

    I used poly mixed with thinners......put it on like one would french polish a table...
    but it was hard to get it just right...too much work and thinners would bite real quick...took a while to master it..but when I did ..came up fabulous.
    .

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    6

    Default Feedback

    Attached are some before and after pics.
    The chequering was in good condition, so I did not need to re-cut.
    I used Rustins Strypit and Rustins Danish oil. Lots of coats. Never managed to get all the gun oil out of the wood, but wrote it off to 'character'.

    Thanks for all the advice.

    Philip

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,915

    Default

    Nice job Philip.

    Personally I prefer the darker shades of timber but you have done a nice job of restoration - it should age gracefully and give you lots of satisfaction when you look/use it.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    2,646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob38S View Post
    Nice job Philip.

    Personally I prefer the darker shades of timber but you have done a nice job of restoration - it should age gracefully and give you lots of satisfaction when you look/use it.
    he's got a lovely bit of wood tho...I prefer the resto to the dark

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,915

    Default

    It certainly is - I especially like the figure in the stock.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,674

    Default

    Nice job Philip, looks like a pretty good job on the metal work as well, adds up up to top resto

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Westleigh, Sydney
    Age
    74
    Posts
    9,159

    Default

    Lovely result. What was the timber, do you know?
    Visit my website
    Website
    Facebook

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    153

    Default

    Lignum Vitae maybe?

    As to books if you are doing this again get the first 3 books in the series Brownell's "Gunsmith Kinks" (google Brownells gunsmith supplies). They are worth their weight in gold for the aspiring gunsmith. Plus they make entertaining reading.
    "Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem"

Similar Threads

  1. Rifle Stock
    By bellballistics in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 6th Feb 2010, 02:28 PM
  2. Rifle Stock Issue
    By Gate7 in forum RESTORATION
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29th Jan 2009, 08:24 PM
  3. Walnut Rifle Stock Surface Preparation & Finish
    By Rabbitz in forum FINISHING
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 28th Oct 2008, 08:08 PM
  4. Advice Sought on Rifle Stock Timber
    By Paratus in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11th Jun 2006, 09:19 AM
  5. Rifle restoration
    By Eddie Jones in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 30th Jan 2006, 02:44 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •