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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
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    2,227

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    Sorry about the flash heavy photography it's been raining here, and it's as dark as sin!
    I'm not about to say that the carburettor is finished, but is to the point that I'll move on.

    IMG_1198.jpg

    Once the top half of the crankcase is made every thing that's been done so far will be put in place
    and re-detailed.

    Meaning I'll strip it down and re-paint all the parts.
    It will give more depth to the overall finish.

    IMG_1195.jpg IMG_1197.jpg

    I've got to say I've really enjoyed making the carburettor.

    Fiddly little detail floats my boat!

    And I get a real kick out of knowing what it's made from.
    Given a chopstick, a tent peg, a credit card and some pens and a pencil.
    I don't think they'd find themselves combined in a carburettor very often.

    The chopstick by the way is what makes the choke lever.

    IMG_1199.jpg IMG_1202.jpg

    Anyway I hope you've all enjoyed the build to this point.

    Hopefully with the crankcase made it will really start to look like a 1930 Indian engine.

    Cheers.

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nowra, NSW, Australia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,003

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    It looks really spot-on. And you say it needs another paint & detail.
    The quality of your work leaves me speechless.
    ... Steve

    -- Monkey see, monkey do --

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dundowran Beach
    Age
    73
    Posts
    19,921

    Thumbs up

    Hermit says it all!!bravabravabrava

    Now that I feel completely inadequate you can stop posting!

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Age
    42
    Posts
    106

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    WOW! Jaw....meet floor. If you didn't show the construction photos I would not believe it was a scale model, looks absolutely real. The skill and attention to detail are mind blowing.

    I'm curious, what do you do with the finished models? Do they sit in your living room to admire & gather dust? Do you donate them to a museum so that more people can admire them? Perhaps sell them for insane prices in a gallery befitting the works of art that they are? Or maybe you plan to pass them on through the generations as a family heirloom?
    Michael

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
    Posts
    2,227

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    Thanks glad you like the work.
    But I really need to stop calling it work, nothing could be further from the truth.
    There's no work being done here, I'm far to busy having fun.

    Over the last few years I've probably been having to much fun.
    The shed is full as well as the carport, and I'm rapidly running out of space.

    At 2/3 scale in the shed is The Ariel & sidecar, a 1920 Harley-Davidson, a chain driven Napier,
    the engine for a Rolls Royce Silver Ghost and The Outlaw Hotrod.
    Under the carport a T Model Ford C Cab Van, a 1970's Rail Dragster as well as three six foot Billycarts.
    Also 1 to 1 scale a remote controlled Dalek, K9 the robot dog and the Tardis.

    No wonder I'm single!

    I'd really like to have a café in a small town one day.
    But that's about as far as my ambition goes.
    I don't sell anything, I consider every thing I make as belonging to my son.

    I have had some pretty insane offers to buy my work or have me build for people.
    But I guess I'm just one of those Neff Plonkers who thinks that money can't make you a better person.

    I'm just having fun!
    Glad you like the bike so far.
    Thanks.

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
    Posts
    2,227

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    I thought I'd better add what I got done today.

    The next step with the engine is to workout the size of the crankcase.
    Not having any real plans for the Indian, I get what I can from online photos.

    I found one of the sump and turn it into a template for the crankcase.
    It's a small picture but it's almost taken vertically above the sump.
    So it's not to distorted by the perspective of the view.

    bbb.jpg

    I enlarged the picture on my paint program and turned it into a drawing.
    Now I can take the measurement of the four barrel's I've built and scale the drawing of the sump up.
    Until the position of the barrel's match their right location on the drawing.

    It's a bit of a cheat I know but it's a really simple way to get the job done.
    I'll need to workout a couple of other reference points but this one picture already gives me,
    The diameter of the flywheel housing and the gearbox.

    Sorry guy's I'm not very High Tech!

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
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    2,227

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    I took the layout for the crankcase down to the local office equipment store and got them to enlarge it.
    When got home I put the prototype barrel on it, and it look's like the scale is as close as dam is to swearing.

    IMG_1205.jpg

    So best I don't aim to high over the the weekend after getting away with that.
    I think I've used up all my good luck in one go there!
    But it is nice when you can start to see that it's coming together without to much of a fight.

    Over the weekend I'll cut the parts from the layout and start to block out some of the form of the crankcase.

    Cheers.

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
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    2,227

    Default

    I got started on the crankcase.
    I cut out the two half's from the plan, and started blocking out the gearbox and flywheel housing.

    IMG_1209.jpg IMG_1208.jpg

    The first picture is the sump, and the second the top of the crankcase.
    It all looks a bit rough at the moment but as more is added it should start to make sense.

    IMG_1211.jpg IMG_1215.jpg

    I'll keep added the basic shapes of the crankcase until the overall layout is complete.
    Then I'll start detailing by blending the blocked sections together.

    IMG_1216.jpg

    It's fair to say that no matter how complex an object is.
    In the end it can be reproduced with simple shapes.
    Or at least that's what I try to do.

  10. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dundowran Beach
    Age
    73
    Posts
    19,921

    Thumbs up

    Your idea of "a bit rough"is far removed from mine!!!

  11. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Nowra, NSW, Australia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,003

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    Quote Originally Posted by Repliconics View Post
    It's fair to say that no matter how complex an object is.
    In the end it can be reproduced with simple shapes.
    Or that least that's what I try to do.
    That's someting I've been especially enjoying during this build - your ability to turn common household items into sophisticated parts of the model.
    Lovin' it. Keep up the good work fun.
    ... Steve

    -- Monkey see, monkey do --

  12. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Leander, TX Central Texas Area
    Age
    42
    Posts
    1,061

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    This is just a fantastic build. I can't get over how you get such a realistic finish. Would you care to share your techiques and what type of paint you use? I would love to see you tackle a small block Chevy.

    Bret

  13. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
    Posts
    2,227

    Default

    Thanks Bret, glad your enjoying it.

    I paint the parts mainly with Automotive sprays.
    Pretty much treating it as if it was the real deal.

    The motor I built for the Rail Dragster was nearly all made from MDF.

    a2.jpg a3.jpg

    One of the things I've found really helpful along the way, is to build each part individually.
    That's to say I made each piece as if it was from a real engine.
    So each part is bolted to the next.
    That in it's self makes it much easier to paint and get a better finish.

    a4.jpg

    I've got to say spray filler is great stuff.

    The curved edge on the blower is made out of pieces of PVC pipe.
    After I'd made the basic shape the hole blower got a coat of bodyfiller, followed by two coats of spray filler.
    Then two coats of primer and finally three coats of chrome.

    So even on materials like Pine, MDF and PVC using auto paint can give you a great finish.

    I hope that helps a little mate.
    Cheers.

  14. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St. Helens Tasmania
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    I got a bit more of the crankcase blocked out over the weekend.
    The basic shape is slowly coming together.

    IMG_1225.jpg

    When the crankcase is finished the parts I've already made will attach on the flat section.
    I've still got the main part of the sump to do.

    IMG_1238.jpg IMG_1234.jpg

    I must say it's a bit of an odd shape to build.
    Hopefully it will all make sense in the end.

    Cheers.

  15. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sutherland Shire, Sydney
    Age
    68
    Posts
    1,257

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    I haven't been following this build for a while, but have thoroughly enjoyed catching up with the incredible detail. Some of the fun is finding a piece of "junk" that can be made into an exact scale replica of a highly engineered component of the bike.
    My Dad had an Airiel? Square Four and an AJ Smith bike in the late 1940's or early 1950's as well as an Indian, so this project has a bit more relevance for me.

    I admire your patience and attention to detail, and will be following your progress much more closely now.
    Thank you for posting, especially with the great quality photographs.

    Alan...

  16. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Leander, TX Central Texas Area
    Age
    42
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    Repliconics thanks so much for explaining your technique. Using the body filler and filler primer I can see how you could obtain the finish on the MDF now. I made a cabinet from MDF and put drywall putty on all the edges so I could get a smooth finish. It worked but it was alot of extra effort to get it there. So I now have more respect for your finish for I can imagine how much sanding you do to get it just right before paint. And the patience during each layer of paint and sanding in between. Well Done.

    Bret

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