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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    Hi Keith

    ...... and I believe fletty has some of these Liogier Rasps - Lee Valley Tools
    Yes, but I only have one .... and it’s as crooked as a rat’s tail
    a rock is an obsolete tool ......... until you donít have a hammer!

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  3. #62
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    but is it more effective than sandpaper when it comes to shaping wood?

    I know the Auriou rasps are brilliant as are the F.Dick ones -- but I don't think the F.Dicks are available in model maker sizes
    regards from Sydney

    ian

  4. #63
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    Question

    I know I'm getting ahead of things but just wondering what the cylinder under the coach is for.
    My guess is a shock absorber for the car as it comes to a stop?
    I've seen this under one other car but not all have them.
    Just passenger cars?
    When I was doing research for my
    caboose
    I remember reading about passengers getting knocked about because of the wipe lash as the train starts and stops.


    Capture 5.PNG

  5. #64
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    I think you have to be very careful when dealing with pictures of the replica Rocket and carriages.
    It is quite likely that the replica Rocket and its carriages are fitted with a type of brake that was unknown in 1829. The cylinder you refer to might be part of that brake.

    or, as you surmise, it might be some form of shock absorber that wasn't fitted to the original carriages
    regards from Sydney

    ian

  6. #65
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    I'm sorry but I know nothing of old trains from England's past but found a couple picture where they needed to use a spacer for the engine and carriage to mate up, as you say for an older train to work with a newer carriage.
    Here's the video and then some cuts of the board used to match them up.

    Just some things I found very interesting about this train.


    Cool video about it's not having brakes.


    And one showing the spacer between the engine and carriage.
    This is a replica I think so have to add this into the mix.


    Capture 6.jpgCapture7.jpg

  7. #66
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    Thanks for posting those videos.

    Alan will have had a much better look when he saw the replica in the flesh, but I think the carriages may be replica coachwork on a more modern chassis
    regards from Sydney

    ian

  8. #67
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    Hi All,

    I am so happy that so many are getting involved with the Rocket and giving me detailed information that I otherwise would not have.

    Thanks so much

    Hope I can do the Rocket justice.

    I think the replica has a lot shorter smoke stack than the original. I have some information that the original stack was 15ft from rail to top of stack. Probably too tall to fit under the bridges on the tracks the replica runs on.
    My build will have the taller stack - although makes it a bit harder to display when complete Will have to persuade Cath

    Regards

    Keith

  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by htl View Post
    I know I'm getting ahead of things but just wondering what the cylinder under the coach is for.
    My guess is a shock absorber for the car as it comes to a stop?
    I've seen this under one other car but not all have them.
    Just passenger cars?
    When I was doing research for my
    caboose
    I remember reading about passengers getting knocked about because of the wipe lash as the train starts and stops.
    Here’s another picture of the carriage.....

    7601ED34-BA54-4E0F-92E3-BC83C9C37D6A.jpeg

    ..... which shows the shaft a bit more clearly. I also noticed that the same device is on the open wagon in the video. It runs from buffer to buffer with a larger diameter section in the middle. It could well be a shock absorber with rubber blocks in compression in the larger diameter centre section?
    a rock is an obsolete tool ......... until you donít have a hammer!

  10. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by fletty View Post
    Here’s another picture of the carriage.....

    7601ED34-BA54-4E0F-92E3-BC83C9C37D6A.jpeg

    ..... which shows the shaft a bit more clearly. I also noticed that the same device is on the open wagon in the video. It runs from buffer to buffer with a larger diameter section in the middle. It could well be a shock absorber with rubber blocks in compression in the larger diameter centre section?
    I pretty much agree with fletty, I think hidden behind the cover in the middle is some sort of shock absorber, be it a spring, rubber, leather or some sort of other available material at the time.

    With chimmney length, when you build a railway out in the open and you have no tunnels, or over bridges you can have a tall chimney (which could assist your fire). However once you start going under roads and making tunnels height becomes a big issue. Keith there is nothing to stop you having a full size chimney for public showing, and a reduced size one if you have restricted head room to display it at home.

    What is called the loading gauge, the size of engine or carriage that can travel on a section of track is still an issue today in the United Kingdom. Some engines are too big to travel on some sections of line.
    In Australia it also happens. The bigger steam engines of South Australia are too big to travel on Victorian tracks. Also compare the size of most deisel engines used in the eastern states compared to the ones in northern Western Australia for the mines.

  11. #70
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    Kevin,

    I have a question. Probably a bit early in the piece with regard to my build. I have had a look at the videos that Bruce supplied and it is quite difficult to see - but do you know if the pistons are timed so that they push on the wheels at 90 degrees to each other so there is no stall point. (Hope that makes sense). I know the Lion crank was set at 90 degrees and not 180 degrees to prevent the loco from stalling when it came to a halt.

    Fletty - did you notice the cylinder positions at the museum? - Thanks

    Regards

    Keith

  12. #71
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    Hi Keith
    If you look at the second video posted by htl, around the 0:50 mark you can see that steam is exhausting from the cylinders about 90 degrees out of sync, and that the cylinders are "wobbling". To my eye, the cylinders are "wobbling" because they are opposed at 90 degrees.

    Hope this helps
    regards from Sydney

    ian

  13. #72
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    2photos taken almost simultaneous of the stationary engine show the eccentric on the left wheel at 360 degrees and the right at 270 degree = 90 degree out synch
    a rock is an obsolete tool ......... until you donít have a hammer!

  14. #73
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    The last video at the 50 second spot shows the piston arms working.
    Very interesting stuff!

  15. #74
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    Thankyou Gentlemen - much appreciated

    Regards

    Keith

  16. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by fletty View Post
    2photos taken almost simultaneous of the stationary engine show the eccentric on the left wheel at 360 degrees and the right at 270 degree = 90 degree out synch
    Alan, Are you replying from recovery?
    Hoping all went well today.. Cheers, Peter

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