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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
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    Melbourne
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    Default Hi all! I've got this antique Jointer - any good?

    G'day all

    I've recently decided to get into a bit of woodwork. As soon as I did, I got handed this old jointer with no known history or info.

    It appears to be a Denman Robinson (Supercut Industries) made locally in Vic in the 1960s.

    Just wondering if it's any good? I got an extra set of knives with it but not really confident in putting them in straight. I've run a few boards across it with the existing knives however they are chipped and I don't really know how to use the jointer so have managed to face the boards at angles / still with a bow in them.

    Hoping to get some tips from you guys. Should I just move this on or is it worth doing a bit of resto on and making use of it? I would love for an expert to come and have a look and help me set it up! Perhaps when lockdown is over?

    Cheers,
    Tim / Tangles





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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Mornington Peninsula
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    Default

    Welcome.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    Default

    I wouldn’t mind getting a present like that

    With a good clean, a check on the alignment of the beds and the old knives sharpened or the new blades fitted, it will be a great machine IMO.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Whangarei, New Zealand
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    Default

    What he said: a bit of a clean up, making sure the infeed and the outfeed are co-planar and the fence is square (and straight and not twisted in itself) you'll be just fine. Those tables are more generous than most under and over machines - you'll be fine once you learn the right technique.
    I recommend watching some youtube videos on how to use a jointer. I got my lessons from a Fine Woodworking magazine
    some decades ago. It's not too hard to pick up, but exceeds the scope of a post in the Welcome Wagon forum.

    Best of luck, -Peter

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    182

    Default

    I have a 60’s Paul Call jointer that was my fathers. it is no where near perfect but I don’t the money to buy a newer jointer with spiral head. So much better than no jointer.
    You can buy new blades if needed from saw service places. They can cut them to any length you need.
    If you have not used a jointer before, make sure you look at safety. My father lost the tops off 2 fingers year ago using the jointer.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have a 60ís Paul Call jointer that was my fathers. it is no where near perfect but I donít the money to buy a newer jointer with spiral head. So much better than no jointer.
    You can buy new blades if needed from saw service places. They can cut them to any length you need.
    If you have not used a jointer before, make sure you look at safety. My father lost the tops off 2 fingers year ago using the jointer.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Rockhampton QLD
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    Default

    Welcome to the forum Tim.

    Ross

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    blue mountains
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    Default

    Hi Tim and welcome to the forum. That is a a good solid machine and like the others say will make a good addition to your workshop. It's about the same vintage as the one I use. I dont see a safety guard but its easy to make a plywood one. With a good clean, sharp knives and properly set up it will do a good job. I would suggest new bearings at some stage on a machine that age but if it runs reasonably quiet then its ok for now. You can really tell by the squeal if they are shot. Plenty stuff on line on sharpening, setting up and getting the best out of your jointer. It will be hard during the lockdown getting anyone to come round to help but it gives you time to study up a bit and give it a clean up. To put things perspective a new modern version of that will cost about $800 and upwards and not be as well built.
    Regards
    John

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sunbury, Vic
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    81
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    2,452

    Default

    It appears very similar to the Gilbro machine from around that time.
    There has been discussion on the Gilbro machine on the forum so perhaps do a search for that thread as it should help you. I have found it and tried to add here but no luck. It is under "Gilbro Super Smoother" and dates back to Feb 2014. Hope that helps
    As has been said above, you certainly need a guard over the blade to protect fingers.
    Tom

    "It's good enough" is low aim

  10. #9
    crowie's Avatar
    crowie is offline Life's Good, Enjoy each new day & try to encourage
    Join Date
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    G'Day & Welcome to a top forum "Tim"....
    There are quite a stack members around Melbourne and cross Victoria plus the rest of the country.....
    You'll find a heap of helpful & knowledgeable blokes & ladies on the forum and for most very willing to assist.
    Make sure you show off your handiwork as everyone loves a photo, especially WIP [Work In Progress] photos with build notes.
    Enjoy the forum.
    Enjoy your woodwork.....
    Cheers crowie

    PS - Watch out for local Melbourne get togethers, great way to meet like minded forum members & network; once the lockdown has finished of course...

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Perth, Australia
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    Default

    I'd definitely look at fitting a guard to it before use but otherwise it should be a good first machine once it's setup.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Alexandra Vic
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    Default

    I'm thinking a Woodfast myself, I have the Gilbro super smoother and can see some obvious differences, though the general layouts are similar. There is nothing to indicate effective working width.

    I suspect that the small badge at the end of the fence is a retailers mark rather than a manufacturers mark. For the manufacturers mark I would be looking at the 'badge' on the side of the machine between the cutter head and motor. I would be installing a guard before you do much work with it, it would use the swing away spring loaded type guard that would normally mount in a hole on the left side of the infeed table just ahead of the rebating support.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Shepparton
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    Default

    welcome to the forum, this machine is very similar to the jointer that I used as a apprentice cabinet maker in the early seventies and it was great to use with a GUARD, as stated by others there will be plenty of advice on how to run this successfully ,cheers and stay safe.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Default

    Welcome to the forum.
    Make sure you get or make a guard for that jointer, it will not give you a second chance.

    Regards
    Keith

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