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  1. #1
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    Default Deconstructing Natsuki Ishitani's Kigumi Table

    So I've been following Ishitani Furniture on Youtube for a couple of years now, big fan of his design aesthetic and the production quality on the videos is top notch. One of my favourite videos is his Kigumi table so I'm going to cover how I'm deconstructing it here and hopefully post some build photos once I'm confident I can get it done. I want to use this as an opportunity to learn the right terminology as well so if I'm off the mark with something let me know!





    I've been doing some rough sketches in a notebook but started to understand the reason why I like this table so much is because of the way all the parts hang together. Getting one part sized wrong means the whole thing looks kind of awful to my eye. So after doing some thinking and asking around for advice here's the plan.


    • Pick apart the video frame by frame looking for good reference points. I've been shooting and editing videos for work occasionally over the last few years so luckily I have Final Cut Pro at my disposal. I've already imported the Youtube video so now I'm going through tagging the video section by section so I can come back quickly later. Much nicer than watching it on Youtube 100 more times
    • Start modelling the components in the Sketchup individually so I can see how they hang together. I won't be using this for final sizing as I find perspective confusing on 3D models but more to see how minor changes affect the overall look of the whole piece. Think of it like a scale model or maquette.
    • Using my Sketchup components as a guideline I start making templates on some MDF to get an idea for how things look at life size. Thanks to Derek Cohen for the tip!


    I'm going with a solid top so the majority of the complexity will be the leg assemblies and stretcher joinery - that's we'll start! Here he has cut out the tee bridle pin on the foot of the leg assembly using a series of cuts to depth on the sliding panel saw. The tee bridle pin also is set back from the top of the foot by about 1/2" to create a sort of shoulder for the leg bridle socket to sit on. Then we can see them being dry fit before the tapers are cut on the foot.





    Unfortunately we don't see the tapers on the foot being cut on camera so I'll need to figure those out from the photo at the beginning of this post, there was this one from glue up but the perspective makes things tough. Off to do some Sketchup!


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  3. #2
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    Default

    Actually made some decent progress on the leg assembly, getting a lot more comfortable with Sketchup now and it's quirks. Have the tee bridle joints all mocked out and used the recommended sizes from the book 'Woodwork in Theory and Practice' for the height of the table. Actually a pretty good book, lots of good illustrations and explanations although I wish there were a few more illustrations and less explanations at times. Has some great info on timber movement, species etc as well.



    Next up is the tapers on the feet. I'm going to save both of these components in their current state and work off copies though, then I can alternate between different taper angles on the fly and see what looks better. Will probably experiment with the width of the leg as well, now that I have this as a starting point I can really play around with things.

  4. #3
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    Note for anyone new to Sketchup - making a copy of a component will edit all other copies of that component. Remembered this when all my backups looked the same as my current working version. All good though, just have to remember to make copies unique and away we go.

    Re-did the leg and foot with about a 10% reduction in thickness and changed the joinery to accommodate. Then I put an 8° taper on the each side of the foot. Pretty happy with the bottom of the leg assembly now, I'm going to move onto figuring out the taper on the top of the legs and then the dovetailed rail which holds the top. The rail is a close copy of the foot but the geometry will be slightly different for the bridle joint due to the taper. I also snagged a shot of the underside of the leg assembly in the video and think I got it pretty close, time will tell!






    Feedback welcomed! Now that I look at it again I think the feet might need to be shortened closer to the leg but I think I've been looking at it too long.

  5. #4
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    Dan, the vertical leg looks like it tapers - not parallel. If it does not, then I would do so as that is a nice aesthetic. Of course, it might make this all harder to get square (tip - add the tapers after forming the joint).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  6. #5
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    Interesting table saw he runs with this on the side . Looks handy . I’d make sure no one held the wood that way in my workshop though
    5C349E48-D793-4B49-BD54-3CD593558C92.jpg

    Nice table to build . Are you going with Oak or something else ?

    Rob

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    Dan, the vertical leg looks like it tapers - not parallel. If it does not, then I would do so as that is a nice aesthetic. Of course, it might make this all harder to get square (tip - add the tapers after forming the joint).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Thanks Derek, do you mean like this or with a different taper on each side?



    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    Interesting table saw he runs with this on the side . Looks handy . I’d make sure no one held the wood that way in my workshop though
    5C349E48-D793-4B49-BD54-3CD593558C92.jpg

    Nice table to build . Are you going with Oak or something else ?

    Rob
    He uses that a fair bit when cutting tenons and bowties, I've often wondered if that was it's intended use. Can't recall ever seeing something like that driven off that shaft of a rip saw before. I know there are a ton of attachments for the combo machines though.

    Probably going with Jarrah unless some other nice timber falls into my lap. I'd love to do it in Tasmanian Oak but Jarrah is pretty hard to pass up for the price here in WA. Which reminds me, I need to go to see the timber bloke!

  8. #7
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    Actually just remembered there is a shot of him cutting the tapers.


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