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  1. #1
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    Default Removing the waste from half blind sockets

    In July, I posted a router-based method I used to remove the waste from hand cut hand-blind sockets (link). This involved orientating the boards vertically and routing into the end grain. This necessitated a rather clumsy piece of work-holding - which, as I explained at the time, was difficult to avoid as the end grain was not square to the sides, as is usual with drawer front. The bow fronted drawers created ends which were angled.



    With the usual square drawer fronts, both Bill and Roger on the forum preferred to place their boards flat on the bench and rest the router on the edge. Roger's photos ...



    However, this method leaves is too much waste remaining at the sides of the socket - as this is angled and the router bit is vertical - which means that there is more work needed to clear ...



    Bill's objection - that holding the work piece vertically looked too clumsy for easy work - continued to ring in my head. The horizontal method certainly had the advantage of being more stable. So, now that my then-current project, the Harlequin Table, is complete, between pieces I take some time to solve these problems. Which I have, and hopefully in a way that others will find helpful.

    Just as an aside, my preference is hand tool work, and generally if the wood is willing this is my go-to. The method here is not to replace all hand work, but to make the process easier in particular circumstances. Some of the timbers I work, especially for cases and drawer fronts, are extremely hard, and it is not viable to chop them out, particularly when there are several to do. It is not simply that this is time consuming - after all, this is just my hobby - but that it is hard on the chisels. I use machines to compliment hand tools. There is a time and place for everything.

    Let's take it from the beginning:

    Step 1: saw the pins ...



    Step 2: deepen the kerfs with (in my case) a kerfing chisel (see my website for more info) ...



    Now we come to the new jig. I must tell you that this did my head in for a long time. As with everything, there is a simple solution, and in the end it could not have been simpler!

    The need is (1) quick and easy set up, (2) accurate routing leaving minimal waste, and (3) visibility and dust control (bloody machines!).

    The jig

    This turned out to be nothing more than a block of wood. This one is 16"/440mm long x 4"/100mm high and 2"/50mm wide.



    I used MicroJig clamps, which slide along a sliding dovetail. This is not necessary; one can just use a couple of F-clamps. However the MicroJig clamps not only make work holding less finicky, but they extend the length of the board one can hold with this particular jig to 500mm. That is easily enough for most case widths.



    To use, place face down on a flat surface and clamp the drawer front close to centre ...



    Up end the combination, and place the end of the drawer front into your vise. This could be a face vise or, as here, a Moxon vise. Note that the image is taken from the rear of the vise ...



    This is what you will see when standing in front of the jig/vise ...



    Let's talk about the router.

    This is a Makita RT0700C trim router. Fantastic little router: 1 hp, variable speed, soft start. Together with a Mirka 27mm antistatic dust hose, the dust collection is amazing! The photo shown is after use, and there is no dust to be found (I very much doubt that a small plunge router could remain this clean). That also means that visibility is good, even though it does not have a built-in light. There are other excellent trim routers around for much the same price. This is the one I use.



    The base

    The base is the other half of the jig. This made from 6mm perspex. This is not the strongest, but does the job. I plan to build another out of polycarbonite (Lexan), which is much tougher.



    There is just the single handle as the left hand will grip the dust outlet.

    Below is the rear of the base. Note the adjustable fence/depth stop ...



    This is the underside ...



    Plans for anyone looking to make their own ...



    Setting up

    Step 1: set the depth of cut - I scribed marks on the fence for two drawer side thickness I use. Mostly I use 6mm (or 1/4"). The other is 10mm, which is used here. I shall make another, deeper fence, so that I can add a few other thicknesses, such as 19mm for case sides.



    Step 2: set the cut to the boundary line - this is done as close as possible. In the end I want to leave about 1mm to clear with a chisel (this is such an important line that I am not willing to take a risk here). If you move the bit side-to-side, the scratch pattern will show where it is cutting ...



    The result

    The router bit is 5/32" carbide. It is very controllable, and this makes it possible to freehand close to the side kerfs. The fence/depth stop prevents over-cutting the boundary line. In 15 seconds, this is the result ...



    Turn the board around to chisel out the waste ..



    Order of waste removal

    First lever away the sides. The waste here is paper thin and breaks away ...



    Secondly, place a wide chisel in the scribed boundary line, and chop straight down ...



    Finally, use a fishtail chisel into the corners to remove this ...



    A note: removing the waste this cleanly and easily was facilitated by using the kerfing chisel to ensure that there was a release cut at the sides of the socket.



    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Default

    Derek,
    Another fantastic helpful thread, also a big thumbs up for the Trim Router.
    I have the cordless model an LOVE it, if anyone is thinking about buying one.

    Cheers Matt.

  4. #3
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    It occurred to me later that a central issue that was concerning me was one I neglected to emphasise!

    You have to ask why I set up the work holding so that I pull the trim router towards myself? The alternative is to push the router away from themselves. The reason for my direction is visibility - It seems easier to observe where the bit goes, especially as it runs along the boundary line. I can accept that others may feel they get this with the bit moving away from them, but this way works best for me.

    Linked to this is my insistence in using a trim router. I have a couple of plunge routers I could use. Visibility with these is better than with a trim router, however dust control is much poorer. To achieve the level of dust control I want (100%), I must use this trim router, and it must be pulled toward oneself, not pushed away, since only the front of the router has a window.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  5. #4
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    Mar 2008
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    Hobart, Tas
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    Thanks for posting that Derek. I was particularly interested as it appears to use the same clamping foundation as your morticing jig. Looking again, the only addition I think your morticing jig offers are the rails to place end stops. Perhaps the next time you do some morticing, and time allows, you could offer a similar write-up.

    Kind regards,
    Lance

  6. #5
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    Mar 2008
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    Hobart, Tas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    I have the cordless model an LOVE it, if anyone is thinking about buying one.
    Huh, funny you should mention it. I was asking about the cordless Makita trim router a month or so ago with every intention of buying it, but no local stockist had it (14 day lead time), then the business of life got in the way and finally got around to ordering it today. Oh, I also made sure it came with the dust extraction attachment!

    Kind regards,
    Lance

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post
    Thanks for posting that Derek. I was particularly interested as it appears to use the same clamping foundation as your morticing jig. Looking again, the only addition I think your morticing jig offers are the rails to place end stops. Perhaps the next time you do some morticing, and time allows, you could offer a similar write-up.

    Kind regards,
    Lance
    Hi Lance

    Great minds think alike. I did try and utilise the mortice jig - in fact, routed horizontal sliding dovetails to clamp across the face and not just in the slots shown here ...



    However, this jig clamps forward and does not enable the router to work towards oneself (as explained above). One of the ideas I had (and I tried a few) was a spacer in the Moxon for the router bit. It was becoming bigger than Ben Hur. In the end I realised that a simple block of wood was all that was needed.

    Regarding the cordless trim router: it is very expensive compared with the corded version (about 3 times the price). And then there is the issue of dust control - the cordless router still needs to be attached to a dust hose, so it is not really cordless. I see a value for it for tradesfolk working on site.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekcohen View Post
    In the end I realised that a simple block of wood was all that was needed.
    Ahhh, yes. Now that I see both together(ish) the issues you raise become evident (it is a good thing we can learn from others' experiences). Considering you can make another one in under five minutes if the need arises, it is a great solution. I'd not come across those microjig clamps before you showed your mortice jig. They are very simple yet as a system together with the dovetail slot offer an amazing range of uses.

    The router. I thought long and hard about whether to spend the extra on the cordless model and decided it was worth having the flexibility. I understand the point you make about the inevitable umbilical and again, did consider that, but the flexibility won in the end. Oh, and there would only have been a marked price difference has I bought the knockoff version, as the genuine Makita units are pretty much on par ($10 difference) regardless of whether they come with a cord or not (the cost of batteries not withstanding, which I already own).

    Kind regards,
    Lance

  9. #8
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    Excellent thread Derek. Very useful. And yes they are a fantastic little router. It is a bit of a shame they didn’t put a little light in it as they have with other trimmers they make.

    cheers
    Bevan
    There ain't no devil, it's just god when he's drunk!!

    Tom Waits

  10. #9
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    Perth
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    Hi Bevan

    By coincidence, there is a shop tip in the latest FWW magazine to use a reading book lamp (attached to the router). I thought I would try this out ...

    10 LED Eye Care USB Stand Light Clip On Bed Music Reading Book Lamp 607111004165 | eBay

    I was attracted to the cordless version because of the light. However, because of costs, that is only an option if you have the battery and charger (i.e. get a skin).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  11. #10
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    This is how NOT to remove waste from multiple half blind sockets! In the time PS has completed one socket, I would have finished 10 (or more)!

    YouTube

    I am not knocking the method - I use it myself (with some improvements) - but in the context of multiple sockets.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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