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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default Rounding off dressed pine.

    I'm currently getting the materials together to make a Breakfast Bar to be attached to a wall in the kitchen. I've got the pine board, and other bits for legs and foot-rail.

    Being dressed pine, they're all super smooth and the edges are sharp. I want to round off all the edges a bit, to give the bar a more "comfortable" look and feel. Now, I don't have any special tools, just the usual handyman tools and implements. In the past, I've tried rounding off edges of wood and it always turns out a but uneven. I'm thinking there must be a trick to getting uniform edges along the whole length of a piece of timber, and not just relying totally on my eye.

    Has anyone got any tips for doing this successfully?

    Thanks, gents.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    se Melbourne
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,158

    Default

    Use a router with a round over bit. Set it up and check on a piece of scrap and adjust if required. You do not need a table for this job, just a solid surface to put your stock on.

    If you do not have a router there maybe someone close to you that can help out but your location of Australia is too vast to offer assistance.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Woodstock (Cowra)
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    70
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    2,431

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    If you don't have an electric /battery router, simply use a hand or block plane to run a chamfer then jiust finish off with sandpaper (rolling side to side while sanding), I assume you are looking for a max 6 to 8 mm rounding, more than this requires rolling the plane side to side as well
    The person who never made a mistake never made anything

    Cheers
    Ray

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Handyjack View Post
    Use a router with a round over bit. Set it up and check on a piece of scrap and adjust if required. You do not need a table for this job, just a solid surface to put your stock on.

    If you do not have a router there maybe someone close to you that can help out but your location of Australia is too vast to offer assistance.
    Good idea, Jack, but I don't want to buy a new tool just because I've got one job for it to do......... or do I?

    Just had a thought. My cuz probably has one that he might lend me.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rwbuild View Post
    If you don't have an electric /battery router, simply use a hand or block plane to run a chamfer then jiust finish off with sandpaper (rolling side to side while sanding), I assume you are looking for a max 6 to 8 mm rounding, more than this requires rolling the plane side to side as well
    Last time I tried to plane a piece of pine the result was like a plane crash, RW. Just don't have the knack.

    I was hoping there was some chippies trick that I could try. I don't need it to be 100% perfect, just good enough to pass muster.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    blue mountains
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    YouTube
    Plenty of others on line also but this one gives a good explanation of the method used. It will not be as uniform as a router can do but that can make for a more hand made look. Routers can also leave ugly burn marks.
    Regards
    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    McBride BC Canada
    Posts
    3,358

    Default

    Starting with square blanks, I pulled 2 spoke shaves more than a mile in Betula birch to round off the handles of 70 spoons and 30 forks.
    The adjustable Samona (S Korea) spoke shaves were $16.00 each. Not much of a punt.
    I set one for thick and one for thin so there was no messing around with adjustments. Really good steel blades.
    Rought it down, counting the strokes, then kiss off the ridges with the fine setting.

    The true advantage over a router is this:
    You can pull on just part of the edge length to make things even, not just one pass.
    Nobody in my house would have their eyes open wide enough at breakfast time to see any flaws.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Woodstock (Cowra)
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    70
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    John's you tube link shows exactly what I descrided
    Also a good way to start mastering the use of hand planes
    The person who never made a mistake never made anything

    Cheers
    Ray

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    se Melbourne
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,158

    Default

    I actually needed to round over a piece of hard wood so recorded some images of the work.
    The piece before starting. 100_2865.JPG
    Nice square and sharp edges.

    100_2869.JPG100_2868.JPG
    Round over bit with bearing. Piece of scrap test bit, used to check height of bit. It took me three or four tries before I was happy. The setting was not 100% but for the purpose will do the job.

    100_2870.JPG
    The finished piece with sharp square edges removed.

    A bit about the job. The piece being machined is part of the fence for a router table I am making. In fact this was the first time I had the router upside down and attached to the top. It was a complete learning experience for me.

    I have had a router for 30 years, and this is the first table I have tried to make. In the past I would have done this job with the work clamped down and done each edge in one or two passes, depending on how it was clamped down. What I also learned was the router was close to making out its depth to get the bit high enough. Fine adjustment was not easy as I was working against gravity.

    Some places have a dedicated router set up just to do round overs. It might be on the corner of a bench, or done free hand with the work clamped.

    There is more than one way to achieve the result you are after. Depends on what you have, your budget, your time and skills. Also consider how often you will do the same process and rounding over gets done often.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    lower eyre peninsular
    Age
    70
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    find a scrap of wood, plastic pipe what ever is lying around that looks to have the curve size you are looking for.
    Then wrap a piece of sandpaper around it or inside it and rub to your hearts desire.
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    East of Melbourne Aus.
    Age
    68
    Posts
    905

    Default

    You usually need to plane to get rid of router marks. So just use a sharp hand plane.
    I am learning, slowley.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    513

    Default

    The video linked below is the technique I use, and found it very easy to get great results the first time I tried it.

    Start at 21:50.


    Kind regards,
    Lance

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Wow, thanks for all those very helpful posts, Gents! They've given me plenty to think about and to check out. Very much appreciated.

    Next time I log on I hope to have some pix to show. If I don't stuff up, that is...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Handyjack View Post
    I actually needed to round over a piece of hard wood so recorded some images of the work.
    The piece before starting.

    Nice square and sharp edges.
    100_2869.JPG
    Round over bit with bearing. Piece of scrap test bit, used to check height of bit. It took me three or four tries before I was happy. The setting was not 100% but for the purpose will do the job.

    100_2870.JPG
    The finished piece with sharp square edges removed.
    Thanks for those photos, Jack. I can now see how it's supposed to turn out.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LanceC View Post
    The video linked below is the technique I use, and found it very easy to get great results the first time I tried it.

    Start at 21:50.

    Kind regards,
    Lance
    Fascinating to watch, Lance. Especially the part where he makes the groove with a screw head. Ingenious.

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