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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Guyra
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    8

    Default Tas oak dresser by beginner

    Hi all Iíd like to make a dresser/drawers, but Iíve never done any woodworking and request some guidance from you all, initially on timber size.( I'd like to make as much of this myself if possible, but I do have a handy husband who will help, but he's more of a carpenter than a cabinetmaker when it comes to wood)Timber: Tas Oak.Dimensions: 1500 wide x 960 high, including 150 legs. Style: 3 rows of 4 drawers, top shorter than bottom two rows.It will be in my entry/mud room, subject to lots of dirt and dust and an occasional hose out of the floor.The top will overhang a little, but the rest of it should be flush to have no places for dust to settle.I am happy to have the inside of the drawers as metal on runners, but the drawer fronts, visible frame and sides should be Tas Oak.The back will be against a wall, but should at least be wood grain. Underneath should also be enclosed to prevent incursion of dust and spiders.*****I'd like to attached my sketches but can't. I have permission to post attachments and it says Manage attachments, but clicking that doesn't o anything. Any ideas?*****Tas Oak comes in limited sizes that I can access.What sort of size should the timbers be that make up the visible framework and legs?I was thinking that the uprights would need to be 65x42 or at least 42x42?The cross pieces maybe 42 x 32? If rectangular section used then the narrower part to front and wider part going back from the front?I donít really know what the thickness of the drawer fronts, sides, top, back and underneath should be either, for suitable strength.Drawer fronts: 2 pieces of 160 x 32? Or 3 pieces of 110 x 32 to get the 330 I want for the bigger drawers?Side panels Ė is there such a thing as Tas oak veneer? Or I could use 235 x 19 DAR or 135 x 12 and join together on a backing ply board to make a panel. Back and underneath could be something cheaper Ė 10 mm plywood? Since it will be against a wall or under. Joined together 160x32? Then I assume that all the framework would be put together with dowels and glue, and any pieces of timber joined to make a flat piece would be with biscuits and glue? And no paragraph marks???thanks??

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  3. #2
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    mate please, I know your new on here but can you break that BIG paragraph up please, would make it a lot easier to read.
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

  4. #3
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    This is how you load a picture

    upload.png
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Albury
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    Default

    Yep, a picture paints a thousand words so if you could post your drawings that would really help.

    Tonto, the OP (she?) lives in Guyra, it gets so cold up there I'm surprised that it's possible to type at all! There is a notation at the end of the post re. paragraphs so perhaps there was a problem, maybe something to do with the forum upgrade?

    Welcome to the forum Katie if you persevere you'll get some good advice and a good hearing here.
    Forum members PM me for a discount on all my products - https://www.ebay.com.au/str/aldavsstore

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sydney
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    yes apparently the forum upgrade did not fix the no-paragraph-marks issue if the person used HTTPS. Please re-edit the post without using HTTPS (just HTTP) and you will get paragraph marks in it

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Thursday Island
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    For someone who has never done any woodworking you have certainly set your sights high for your first project, I like your style.

    As others have said it's a bit hard to picture it in my head so I will try and draw it out tonight and see if it makes sense. From a cursory read you are thinking of using 2" DAR (finished thickness of around 40mm) for just about everything. I think you may be going a bit too chunky for a lot of it. With the sizes you are talking about this thing is going to be really hefty, very solid, but very hefty. You could probably save a bit of cash by using thinner timber for a lot of it. 62x42 uprights will be very chunky.

    Are you hoping to frame and panel the sides, or is it going to be solid?? What are you looking at storing in this as well.
    I, for one, like Roman Numerals

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Guyra
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Let me try again. I don't seem to be able to edit the original post. This time the WYSIWYG editor is showing, first time it wasn't, sorry about that.

    Hi all Iíd like to make a dresser/drawers, but Iíve never done any woodworking and request some guidance from you all, initially on timber size.( I'd like to make as much of this myself if possible, but I do have a handy husband who will help, but he's more of a carpenter than a cabinetmaker when it comes to wood)

    Timber: Tas Oak.
    Dimensions: 1500 wide x 960 high, including 150 legs.
    Style: 3 rows of 4 drawers, top shorter than bottom two
    rows.

    It
    will be in my entry/mud room, subject to lots of dirt and dust and an occasional hose out of the floor. The top will overhang a little, but the rest of it should be flush to have no places for dust to settle.

    I am happy to have the inside of the drawers as metal on runners, but the drawer fronts, visible frame and sides should be Tas
    Oak.
    The
    back will be against a wall, but should at least be wood grain. Underneath should also be enclosed to prevent incursion of dust and spiders.

    Tas Oak comes in limited sizes that I can
    access. What sort of size should the timbers be that make up the visible framework and legs?

    I was thinking that the uprights would need to be 65x42 or at least 42x42?
    The cross pieces maybe 42 x 32? If rectangular section used then the narrower part to front and wider part going back from the front?
    I donít really know what the thickness of the drawer fronts, sides, top, back and underneath should be either, for suitable strength.

    Drawer fronts: 2 pieces of 160 x 32? Or 3 pieces of 110 x 32 to get the 330 I want for the bigger drawers?
    Side panels Ė is there such a thing as Tas oak veneer? Or I could use 235 x 19 DAR or 135 x 12 and join together on a backing ply board to make a panel.

    Back and underneath could be something cheaper Ė 10 mm plywood? Since it will be against a wall or under. Joined together 160x32? Then I assume that all the framework would be put together with dowels and glue, and any pieces of timber joined to make a flat piece would be with biscuits and glue?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Guyra
    Posts
    8

    Default

    These images show the style I am after. None of these quite right size.
    Referring to the 3 images. I'd like it to look rather like a cross between these 3.
    Have the central part and top of the third image with no legs - remove that floor base.
    But have the style of legs on the second image (the one with 4 legs at front) But mine would have 3 legs at front.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Guyra
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thanks all so far.
    Dogs857: Sights high? - Well I'm clearly showing my ignorance, as I thought it would be pretty straightforward. Yes, it's large, but I hope I have avoided any complexity and need for super skills. Draw fronts just flat bits with metal runner drawers behind them.
    I'm hoping everything is just straight cuts and drill holes straight and glue dowels or biscuits in for most of it. Sounds very easy when I say it .

    Frame and panel the sides? Not sure what that means really, but I think maybe that's what I'm intending. Solid? Can't get a big piece of tas oak, will need to make a big piece by biscuiting DAR together. Or else a ply with Tas oak veneer.
    "Side panels Ė is there such a thing as Tas oak veneer? Or I could use 235 x 19 DAR or 135 x 12 and join together on a backing ply board to make a panel."

    Store?
    This will be in my entry room, so it will mostly hold scarves, beanies, gloves, handbags and other bits and pieces that would be good to keep in an entry room. So relatively light items.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Guyra
    Posts
    8

    Default

    I'd like to replace my first post with the formatted one above so it doesn't put more people off reading it. I can edit the later posts (there is an edit post icon at bottom of those comments, but there is no edit option on the base of my first comment).

    Would a moderator please help me or replace the first comment please?

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sydney
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    180

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaffakatie View Post
    I'd like to replace my first post with the formatted one above so it doesn't put more people off reading it. I can edit the later posts (there is an edit post icon at bottom of those comments, but there is no edit option on the base of my first comment).

    Would a moderator please help me or replace the first comment please?
    I believe you can only edit within the first 24hrs after its been posted.

    Regards,

    Adam

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Melb
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    Default

    Making a set of drawers is a quite a challenge for a beginner, especially when you want the traditional inset style where the drawer front is the same size as the opening, like those in your picture. If the drawer is too loosely fitted, significant gaps will show, and if it is too tight, it will be rubbing against the frame and not open smoothly. You might want to consider oversize drawer fronts though they are never my personal preference.
    I'd also recommend the use of pocket holes to get you started quickly, without having to learn the traditional joinery method. There are plenty of plans and youtube showing you how to do it.
    For example, This plan shows how to make a vanity unit which contain a set of 3 drawers in the style that you like.
    The video shows how to make a set of drawers using pocket holes.
    As far as sizes are concerned, the common frame size is 42 x 42. For the top, I would laminate 20 mm tassie oak together to form a board; For the side, I'd get some tassie oak floating floor which is 9 mm thick and laminate them together, if you don't want to use plywood. Drawer front 20mm, drawer side and back 12mm or 20mm if you use pocket holes, and bottom: 4mm hardboard.

    Have fun and show us pictures of your work.

  14. #13
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    Apr 2012
    Location
    Guyra
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    Default

    Thanks very much "justonething".
    Yes it certainly does look to be a challenge.
    We have the appropriate types of saws I think, and router and I actually bought a pockethole thing a few years ago with this in mind (but had forgotten I had and haven't tried it out!! thanks for reminding me).
    The video is very useful. I particularly liked how the guy on the video used the playing cards to determine the draw spacings, very clever.
    Might be best if I do it in pine rather than the much more expensive tas oak, as mistakes are bound to be made. Similar colour and it will sit in front of a pine panelled wall anyway.
    And maybe I should just first make a single draw box thing as a test run with some plywood, so I can figure out how to use all the tools.
    Thanks very much for the sizes, that's a big help.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
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    Default

    Have you considered making the case out of plywood, then just face dressing with oak to give the appearance of solid timber frame and panel construction??
    That way you can glue and screw the case together, you have solid support for your drawer runners, and it goes together pretty quick. If you use hardwood ply the side panels won't necessarily match the oak, but it can be quite nice to have contrasting timber.

    Just another idea. It's very similar to the video above but maybe a little easier. You could do it with a cordless drill and a hand saw if that's all you have.
    I, for one, like Roman Numerals

  16. #15
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    Jul 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
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    You could also paint the carcass white, so using pine or plywood won't be an issue - and with the careful application of filler and sanding you can hide any/many imperfections. Put Tas Oak drawer fronts on for a contrast if you like and you'll have a very trendy piece.

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