Thanks Thanks:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: glue up brushes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    lower eyre peninsular
    Age
    71
    Posts
    2,723

    Default glue up brushes

    watching youtube and many 'woodworking artists use these glue brushes or silicone spreaders.. are they worth it? I always use a piece of strong cardboard or scrap of thin mdf etc
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Bentleigh East
    Age
    47
    Posts
    418

    Default

    I should probably start buying shares in whatever company makes those


    Also, barbeque skewers, I always have dozens. Great back scratchers too


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Little River
    Age
    75
    Posts
    1,097

    Default

    I just use artist's brushes, dirt cheap, available in many sizes and wash out in water (if you remember and are quick enough).

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    Silicone pastry brushes are great for glue as the glue does not stick when dries you just break it it of, I was sceptical although now I am a convert

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    lower eyre peninsular
    Age
    71
    Posts
    2,723

    Default

    get ya, but is there any advantage over using scraps as mentioned.
    I would love to grow my own food, but I can not find bacon seeds

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hobart, Tas
    Posts
    1,012

    Default glue up brushes

    I use a little 6 mm artist brush for spreading glue in tight joints. It lives in a tub of water, and goes straight back after the glue, so it’s always ready to go after a quick shaking off of the water.

    I do however use shop made thin wood strips for the vast majority of my glue spreading.
    Lance

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    51
    Posts
    2,545

    Default

    I use a Rockler silicone brush for pretty much all my gluing; apart from the thin end being able to get into narrow mortices and biscuit slots it doesn’t really “improve” anything... except I always know exactly where it is so no stuffing around selecting or preparing sticks, pads or whatever you need for the job. The only exception is when gluing up faces greater than 2” wide, then I use an old credit card.

    For Titebond I clean it off with water, for poly I use acetone. If I forget to clean it it’s not a problem as the hardened glues can be easily pulled off the bristles.
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Canberra - West Belco
    Age
    60
    Posts
    559

    Default

    I got a set of 4 silicon pastry brushes, cut the bristles in one down to be short and like Lance keep it permanently in a plastic cup of water, made a quick holder out of some scrap hardwood so it has some weight and doesn't get knocked over. Still have two left in a draw somewhere

    Converted enough to seek out some better silicon brushes that don't want to be pulled off the handle as i use it all the time with Titebond/PVA's.

    So no real need to spend lot's of dollars but the silicon brushes in my opinion are great.

    Epoxies and poly glues I just use whatever scrap wood is lying around

    P1050014.jpg

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,863

    Default

    Nothing wrong with using scraps or anything that does the job.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Perth WA Australia
    Posts
    645

    Default

    I have one similar to this
    Rockler Silicone Glue Brush | Carbatec

    I used to use scraps too and no doubt they work, but using a silicon brush has the following benefits:
    - No need to keep random scraps lying around/finding a suitable piece come glueup time
    - Minimal glue wastage scraps soak up glue
    - The silicon head spreads the glue much more evenly than scrap
    - Its reusable, i've had mine for about 3 years and still going strong.
    - No need to worry about cleaning the brush straight after glueup, which means i can focus all my attention on making sure my clamps are in place and everything is nice and square. When the glue dries you just pull it off and you're good to go for next time round.
    - The other end of the brush is good for spreading glue on dovetails and cleaning up glue squeezeout
    - Its fairly inexpensive, yes costs $12 compared to free but is definitely better than constantly buying cheap brushes.

    At the end of the day if you're happy with spreading glue with scraps then go nuts, I'm also bit of a clean/organisation nutta so scraps are in the bin almost as soon as i make them (generally) so i don't have something small enough to conveniently spread glue around. Plus the mad scramble to find something suitable always used to frustrate me.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Hobart
    Age
    74
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Wooden tongue depressors do a good job for me!

    Cheers
    Yvan

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Perth WA
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    I use me index finger... is always ready and works a treat.
    Experienced in removing the tree from the furniture

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    SE Melb
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    I use a tomato sauce bottle. but I do have silicone brushes if I need to.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,866

    Default

    For gluing, it depends on what you want to spread glue on. My preference currently are thin steel spatulas for spreading inside joints, such as mortices and dovetails, and plastic serrated spreaders for an even depth on flat surfaces.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mareeba Far Nth Qld
    Age
    80
    Posts
    2,961

    Default

    I use a lot of small veneer jobs and find the spreader to inconsistent, a normal 25mm paint brush most effective. The down side is that I tend to leave the brush out and it gets hard with glue. The brushes are soaked in vinegar for a couple of hours and then cleaned with a wire brush, then washed in soapy water. Works well with PVA glue.

    Jim
    Sometimes in the daily challenges that life gives us, we miss what is really important...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Need some brushes
    By Tiger in forum HAND TOOLS - POWERED
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20th Aug 2012, 10:50 AM
  2. GMC ,Brushes
    By ravlord13 in forum TRITON / GMC
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 3rd Sep 2009, 09:07 PM
  3. Mop brushes
    By GJB in forum FINISHING
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 1st Aug 2008, 11:27 AM
  4. Glue up brushes
    By Simomatra in forum GLUE
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20th Jan 2008, 05:18 PM
  5. brushes?
    By reybec in forum HAND TOOLS - POWERED
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21st May 2006, 10:03 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •