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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Earth
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    3,358

    Default How To Route This M&T Joint

    I want to start using this style of M&T joint in a few pieces. I like the look of flat faced rungs/stretchers intersecting the round posts/legs. Where the rail / stretcher has a half round top and bottom and the tenon has no shoulder instead the shoulder is in the mortise.

    Screen Shot 2019-11-05 at 10.37.11 pm.jpg Screen Shot 2019-11-05 at 10.37.49 pm.png


    The best way I can figure is that I use a router to cut out a shallow 5mm deep mortice say 19mm wide using a 19mm bit to form the mortise shoulder. Then I route out the deeper 10mm wide mortice for the tenon (OR maybe that should be reversed - cut the deeper narrower mortise first then the larger shallow mortise after). Either way some kind of indexing jig that will allow me to cut the mortises in the exact centred position seem to be in order. Any pointers for such a jig?

    I then used a 9.5mm half round bit like this one to cut the rail. I expect that I will need a few test pieces to get the rail to fit perfectly. I also figure that I would have to size and finish plane / sand the rail perfectly before routing the round over so as to get and maintain the sizing.


    What am I missing?


    What is this style of M&T called?

    Comments/suggestions...


    Screen Shot 2019-11-07 at 8.44.04 am.png

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Albury
    Posts
    1,952

    Default

    I've created exactly the joint shown in the second pic. to convert a telephone table into a single drawer table for my mother by removing the seat from the side. The joint was created using a home made mortise jig that attaches to my bench with the bit guided by a 3/4" guide bush. I use this jig to rout 1/8", 1/4", 8mm, 3/8" and 1/2" mortises. Loose tenons were used and the stretcher housed in the leg by exactly the method you propose. Rather than using a roundover bit I use a full round bit guided by the router fence - Half Round Side Cutter Bit Arden Router Bit 1/4*1/4 1/4" Shank Arden A0607014-in Milling Cutter from Tools on AliExpress - 11.11_Double 11_Singles' Day If you use a bearing guided roundover bit once you've done one side there's nothing for the bearing to ride on.

    There are plenty of router mortise jig build details on the net and some members here have built some very good ones, Lappa and tccp123 come immediately to mind.

    The table was only Rubberwood, but it did turn out very nicely.
    Forum members PM me for a discount on all my products - https://www.ebay.com.au/str/aldavsstore

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,304

    Default

    You mean, like this ... ?










    The mortices were first cut in the blanks ..





    .. and then turned ..





    The tenons were fitted into the mortice ...





    ... and marked out:





    .. before being rebated (is that the correct term here?) for the shoulder ...






    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    616

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aldav View Post
    ... If you use a bearing guided roundover bit once you've done one side there's nothing for the bearing to ride on...
    That's what the fence is for.

    If you use a full round over bit any slight irregularity or dust on either the work piece, fence or table can translate into an upward movement that results in gouging of the finished surface, as the upper face is trapped inside the cutter. This can also occur by any slight upward pressure from feeding (don't ask how I know all this )

    IMHO you will get a way better result, with less stress, using a normal roundover bit guided by the fence.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    2,679

    Default A little trick.

    "Originally posted by Aldav."
    If you use a bearing guided roundover bit once you've done one side there's nothing for the bearing to ride on.
    Quote Originally Posted by RossM View Post
    That's what the fence is for.
    .......
    IMHO you will get a way better result, with less stress, using a normal roundover bit guided by the fence.
    A little trick:

    If you set the roundover bit about 0.5 mm low, then it will leave a flat top on the moulding 1 mm wide. That is sufficient bearing surface for the second pass on the router.

    Two strokes with sandpaper and no one will ever know.



    Cheers

    Graeme

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