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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Putty View Post
    I'm not after a 'safe by today's WHS standards safe' workplace, and as I see my GP regularly for other matters and he's happy with the state of my respiratory system (which was pretty knackered a long time before I took up woodworking - just unlucky I think).
    The argument that i don't need to worry about "X" because my "X "is already stuffed reminds me of the old timers at the mens shed who, while using certain machines should be using ear muffs to protect their remaining hearing. Instead one member turns off his hearing aid and reckons that's good enough.

    Today's WHS standard are not that good either. Occupational hygienists recommend kids, seniors and persons with pre-existing respirator conditions should be wood working under even more stringent dust conditions.

    I'm not after a safe environment, I'm after a visibly clean one.
    In that case 2 x bathroom fans, or a room air cleaner will help.

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sydney
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    464

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    you still keep saying this:
    My 2300 cfm dusty

    it's not, ignore that.

    The simplest improvement you can make were the first four things in Bob's original post.

    Use Dust Extractor all the time, no matter where you are generating dust. Yes, that means moving hoses, but do it.
    Convert to 6" hoses (and yes, 4" "standard" is sub-par)
    Convert to 6" ports on machines and allow them to breathe
    Make sure the dust extractor is not contributing to the airborne dust by putting it outside

    The earlier point about your family being impacted was a reference to them having to suffer in the future should you fall ill because of ingesting dust.

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Age
    34
    Posts
    92

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    Quote Originally Posted by poundy View Post
    you still keep saying this: [LEFT][COLOR=#333333][FONT=Verdana]My 2300 cfm dusty

    it's not, ignore that.
    ]
    Happy to provide technical manuals/specifications if it helps you get over this foot-high roadblock.

    I understand that 2300 is the rating based at the intake itself, it's a maximum rating like saying a 1000W stereo that's actually 250W RMS. I didn't come down in the last shower. However, calling it literally anything other than what it is would be counter productive and confusing. What would I refer to it as? Which arbitrary number should I pull from the air to attach to it?



    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,069

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    Quote Originally Posted by Putty View Post
    Happy to provide technical manuals/specifications if it helps you get over this foot-high roadblock.

    I understand that 2300 is the rating based at the intake itself, it's a maximum rating like saying a 1000W stereo that's actually 250W RMS. I didn't come down in the last shower. However, calling it literally anything other than what it is would be counter productive and confusing. What would I refer to it as? Which arbitrary number should I pull from the air to attach to it?
    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
    It's not even close to a maximum rating, it's a rough indication as to what the impeller can suck with no filter or cyclone attachments. To further add to the inflated and erroneous info around, the Industry standard way of measuring DCs is incorrect as it only measures the air flow in the very middle of the inlet which is not the average flow across the entire opening, but something like 40% more than the max average flow (again with no filter or cyclone attachments) .
    Anyway - once the DC is above a certain spec the diameter of the ducting is THE major flow limiting step is the size of the ducting with 4" ducting (not flex) has a max flow rate of 400 CFM, 6" about 1250 CFM and 2" is <100CFM.

    A more indicative set of parameters are the motor HP, impeller size, and size of the intake. This will still only tell us the max suck of the impeller then the subtract another 10-15% for the filters, factor in the use of smaller ducting and choked machinery. This is all described ad nauseam in these forums.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Age
    34
    Posts
    92

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    Then the thread can be closed.

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    lower eyre peninsular
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    70
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    2,044

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    bye... close the door gently on your way out.

    we enjoy it here and are willing to learn something from people who have spent time on research
    but each to their cough cough own
    Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.

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