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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
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    26,885

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    Quote Originally Posted by T91 View Post
    a quick question Bob..
    If I put a translucent 240 litre wheelie bin under a ClearVuMax, using a double layer of 19mm MDF laminated as a plug fit in place of the plastic lid, would you expect it to collapse?
    I am sort of expecting it might, so I am thinking up custom made metal reinforcing hoop inserts, to reinforce the walls against collapse.
    thanks in advance
    Brendan
    If full suction is not applied (ie by leaving a gate open or uses a damper valve) I don't expect a well treated wheelie bin to collapse.
    However that also depends on how the bins are treated as they may still develop cracks at weak points.

    The mens shed had 3 wheelie bins which started out just fine.
    However, these bins were emptied by the council using one of those clawed grabber things on teh side of rubbish trucks. The claw grab the bins hard and lifts them up high above the truck.They apply a lot of force on the bin walls.
    The 3 dust collection bins also had vertical slots about 25mm wide and 350 mm long cut into the side near the top of the bin and covered with a perspex so that the level of sawdust could be observed. This created a weak point which was repeated flexed every time they were emptied and when the DC motor was switched on and off. I reckon all this contributed to them developing cracks. Sealing the cracks with silicone only lasted a few weeks.
    Because of all this they now use steel drums and transfer the sawdust into a wheelie./

    Reinforcement is probably a good idea BUT I would avoid even drilling holes in them if you can

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Murray Lands SA
    Posts
    215

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    Liquid column (manometer) from Wikipedia


    The difference in fluid height in a liquid-column manometer is proportional to the pressure difference: {\displaystyle h={\frac {P_{a}-P_{o}}{g\rho }}}


    Liquid-column gauges consist of a column of liquid in a tube whose ends are exposed to different pressures. The column will rise or fall until its weight (a force applied due to gravity) is in equilibrium with the pressure differential between the two ends of the tube (a force applied due to fluid pressure). A very simple version is a U-shaped tube half-full of liquid, one side of which is connected to the region of interest while the reference pressure (which might be the atmospheric pressure or a vacuum) is applied to

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Murray Lands SA
    Posts
    215

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    The "local shed" has a manometer indicating 9" of water column when all blast gates are closed, I suspect there could a few leaks.
    I like the idea of an automatic gate that opens when the water column rises to ?????

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    4,361

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    Using a formula BobL supplied some time ago, that 9 equates to a theoretical max CFM of 1228 in a system using 6 pipe.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    7,261

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    Quote Originally Posted by mannum3 View Post
    The "local shed" has a manometer indicating 9" of water column when all blast gates are closed, I suspect there could a few leaks.
    I like the idea of an automatic gate that opens when the water column rises to ?????
    No need to complicate things, close all gates and adjust the opening to close when one gate is opened.
    CHRIS

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Elizabeth Bay / Oberon NSW
    Age
    74
    Posts
    922

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    Quote Originally Posted by hurcorh View Post
    Bit the bullet. CV1800 finally put on order, already have 6" ducting.
    Trying to find the best solution for the collection bin. I note that there is a mixture of solutions on the forum here from making your own, to wheelie bins, to those blue snap lock drums or steel 220L drums.

    All input welcome.
    As BobL said, make sure you have enough height to accommodate your proposed bin. Rather than using a standard bin and constraining yourself to its height, why not make your own bin(s) to optimise the room available? I made a box and lid from 19mm ply, glued and screwed. The interior joins were sealed with silicone sealant. The lid is secured with cam locks and sealed with 12mm x 25mm rubber strip from Clark Rubber. A handle on the front and rear wheels make it easy to move away.

    It won't collapse. Dust Collection Box.jpg

    mick

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    598

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glider View Post
    As BobL said, make sure you have enough height to accommodate your proposed bin. Rather than using a standard bin and constraining yourself to its height, why not make your own bin(s) to optimise the room available? I made a box and lid from 19mm ply, glued and screwed. The interior joins were sealed with silicone sealant. The lid is secured with cam locks and sealed with 12mm x 25mm rubber strip from Clark Rubber. A handle on the front and rear wheels make it easy to move away.

    It won't collapse. Dust Collection Box.jpg

    mick
    Thanks for the info Mick. How do you empty your bin? Do you just roll this out back and dump it in the garden?

    Cheers.

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Elizabeth Bay / Oberon NSW
    Age
    74
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    922

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    Quote Originally Posted by hurcorh View Post
    Thanks for the info Mick. How do you empty your bin? Do you just roll this out back and dump it in the garden?
    Most of the time I up-end it onto a heap about 5 metres from the dedicated and sound insulated dust extractor shed and the cattle eat it. It would probably be good mulch but the box is too heavy to empty directly into a barrow. The weight is the only downside of the box but using lighter ply could be risky without internal bracing.

    I never use MDF owing to its toxicity and am still considering the fate of the full load of camphorwood shavings currently in the box for the same reason. I suspect they're bound for either the Oberon tip or the floor of one of the sheds to deter rodents.

    mick

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