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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Lappa, yes caps would work but designing an automated blast gate small enough sounds like a lot of fun because I have nothing to do and I might run out of projects, yeah right. I was thinking about using swimming pool PVC which I think is 40mm IIRC.
    If you’re planning to use a central vacuum cleaner as used in houses, designing automated blast gates would be re-inventing the wheel. The way those work is that when you clip the hose into any of the sockets, it switches the vacuum cleaner on remotely. The switch gear is in the socket. It’s designed the opposite way around to how most of us use blast gates and automation but it’s pretty simple and already exists.

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  3. #17
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    Unless multiple short lengths of vac hose are left permanently connected to most or all ports I wouldn't bother with any blast gates or any automation.

    If a single hose is moved from port to port I'd just use lightly spring loaded caps on the ports inside the shed. When the hose is disconnected from a port the vacuum from the vac should make it self seal.

  4. #18
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    A good point lappa, I was going to use 40mm PVC not the whole system but it definitely is something to think about. I have never had any experience at all with domestic ducted systems. Does the ducting contain the wire for the system communication from the wall point to the machine?
    CHRIS

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    I have never had any experience at all with domestic ducted systems. Does the ducting contain the wire for the system communication from the wall point to the machine?
    You’ve got me there I’m afraid. I’ve not used one, but have investigated installing one in between my house and workshop when I build my cottage to retire to in a few years.

    In my mind there are two ways it could work, one is to wire switches into the couplings and the other would be to base it on vacuum in the system, so that when a port is opened, the vacuum drops and a pressure switch turns the motor on.

    I’ll see if I can find anything on how the systems actually work.

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    I have never had any experience at all with domestic ducted systems. Does the ducting contain the wire for the system communication from the wall point to the machine?
    Not ducted vacuums but regular DC's. This is the automated system I am looking at. Something similar might be able to be set up for 40 - 50 mm PVC pipe. https://www.timbecon.com.au/brands/ivac
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  7. #21
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    From Wikipedia

    To use a central vacuum, the vacuum hose is removed from storage and fitted with any needed cleaning accessories (such as a brush). The other end of the hose is inserted into a wall-mounted vacuum inlet, after opening the spring-loaded cover door.[5] In some designs, opening the door switches on the vacuum motor; in other designs, insertion of the metallic hose-end fitting bridges two electrical contacts, signaling the motor to turn on. Other alternative designs feature a remote on/off switch located at the tool end of the vacuum hose, which communicates either via a pair of wires embedded in the hose, or via wireless signaling.

  8. #22
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    I've installed a few domestic fixed vacuum systems. The ones I've done have a low voltage lead (figure 8 wire) running along the length of the duct to the vacuum unit. Two prongs inside the wall mounted socket are bridged out when the hose is plugged in. Was a long time ago I installed those though. They probably have better systems now
    Those were the droids I was looking for.
    "just because I donít need the lathe doesnít mean the beer isnít cold" - Grand Master Flett

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug3030 View Post
    Not ducted vacuums but regular DC's. This is the automated system I am looking at. Something similar might be able to be set up for 40 - 50 mm PVC pipe. https://www.timbecon.com.au/brands/ivac
    Doug, take my word for what it is worth, there will be better value things happening soon but I can't say more than that at the moment.
    CHRIS

  10. #24
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    I want to put in a central vac for the shop but it's a little further down the list. Here is most of the central vacs are 110V driven, so limited in draw. There are some 220V, 15A wet and dry versions but are harder to find. I wanted to put an appropriate cyclone in front and may locate it in the garage below so I wouldn't have to listen to it and to suck up melted snow from the vehicles. Not something you would likely care about.
    Husky Pro Wet and Dry Central Vacuum with Accessory Kit For what it is worth Chris the piping kits are not that much money. Husky Central Vacuum Installation Kit with 3 Wall Inlets

    Pete

  11. #25
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    Hi Chris
    As some know I'm renting here in Canada.
    The typical automated ducted vacuum system uses a series of gates strategically located around the house. The system turns on and sucks whenever a device is plugged into one of the dust ports. (there be wiring in the "tool" that makes this happen ;-) NCArcher has described how it is typically wired.
    The "hose" is smooth wall PVC pipe -- typically 40 mm, I think.
    If you were to implement such a system, you would need 240V, 50Hz power (using 3 pin plugs) to every dust port. AND the whole system would need to be protected by a dedicated breaker so all the ports are live all the time.

    does that make any sense?

    Edit
    I see that Pete (QC Inspector) has posted details of the Husky system
    regards from Canada

    ian

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by QC Inspector View Post
    I want to put in a central vac for the shop but it's a little further down the list. Here is most of the central vacs are 110V driven, so limited in draw. There are some 220V, 15A wet and dry versions but are harder to find. I wanted to put an appropriate cyclone in front and may locate it in the garage below so I wouldn't have to listen to it and to suck up melted snow from the vehicles. Not something you would likely care about.
    wouldn't you just brush the snow off?
    Saskatoon gets as cold and dry as Alberta
    regards from Canada

    ian

  13. #27
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    Ian, good to hear from you, are you back in Canada? At this stage I am only kicking tyres so everything is on the table and I have no hard plans on how it would work. Conventional vacuums rely on airflow to cool the motors and that is about all I know and blocking air flow means they emit smoke from the motor and it stops. Central vacuums must have a different system to avoid the dreaded smoke.
    CHRIS

  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    wouldn't you just brush the snow off?
    Saskatoon gets as cold and dry as Alberta
    Hi Ian
    Yes it is just as cold and dry most of the time but fall and spring snows are wetter and stickier plus Saskatoon loves to dump salt on the roads rather than plow so lots get stuck to the bottom and wheel wells. When it melts the water, because of a lovely crown in the floor, runs to the walls. I go into the garage half an hour to an hour after getting home and suck up the meltwater and slush before it gets to it. Sometimes do it again an hour or two later. Garage is heated because my wife casts pen blanks and it needs to be kept reasonably warm to cure. Besides who enjoys getting into a -20C/-40C car. Heat takes way too long to start warming the interior.

    Back to our regularly scheduled thread.

    Pete

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    Ian, good to hear from you, are you back in Canada?
    yes I am back in Canada.
    But I'll be back in Sydney for about 3 weeks in November. We have a house to settle on and I have a stack of specialist appointments.
    Sorry that we didn't get to catch up while I was in Sydney but I was not very well for most of the time (a consequence of the multi vehicle car crash I was part of back in February) and then down the snow with my son for 4 weeks. Even after being discharged from hospital it was late June before I was feeling up to visiting anyone. Whilst I look OK, I'm still banned from driving till I see my brain doctor in mid-November.


    Conventional vacuums rely on airflow to cool the motors and that is about all I know and blocking air flow means they emit smoke from the motor and it stops. Central vacuums must have a different system to avoid the dreaded smoke.
    not sure about that. Central vacs are intended to run intermittently. I don't know if they draw bleed air for cooling or have a separate cooling opening for motor cooling.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by QC Inspector View Post
    Hi Ian
    Yes it is just as cold and dry most of the time but fall and spring snows are wetter and stickier plus Saskatoon loves to dump salt on the roads rather than plow so lots get stuck to the bottom and wheel wells. When it melts the water, because of a lovely crown in the floor, runs to the walls. I go into the garage half an hour to an hour after getting home and suck up the meltwater and slush before it gets to it. Sometimes do it again an hour or two later. Garage is heated because my wife casts pen blanks and it needs to be kept reasonably warm to cure. Besides who enjoys getting into a -20C/-40C car. Heat takes way too long to start warming the interior.
    I'm just lucky that my heated garage has a flat floor and I can sweep the grit out every week or so.
    regards from Canada

    ian

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