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  1. #1
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    Default Finish for a Workbench

    I am currently making a bench out of repurposed hardwood 4 x 2's. I am wondering what most people finish it with. I was thinking of something like Danish oil.
    Any pros or cons would be appreciated.

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  3. #2
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    Gday Quinny01

    I used an outdoor furniture oil (from Masters) because it would dry properly.
    No regrets, probably due for a re do soon, been a couple of years or so.

    cheers
    Keith

  4. #3
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    The traditional bench finish is boiled linseed oil but the first two suggestions would be ok also. Quite often it's whatever finish you have laying around. Oil finishes are easier to touch up down the track when things start looking a bit shabby.
    Regards
    John

  5. #4
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    Don't use more than a single coat on top (of whatever oil you choose - Danish Oil is fine). No wax! The idea is to avoid a slippery surface. The sides, etc can have a few coats.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  6. #5
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    I have used boiled linseed oil for my top. I also used that for the wooded handled garden tools after the original polish comes off.

  7. #6
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    Hi guys

    Danish Oil is essentially a mixture of boilded linseed, polyurethane and turps. To avoid surface build up I think it should be applied as wipe-on rather than with a paint brush. And don't forget to coat all surfaces to stop uneven drying and timber movement. I like an extra coat on end grain and in the dog holes.

    Traditionalists may prefer to leave out the poly and put on some extra coats. Remember BLO dries slowly.

    Cheers

    Graeme

  8. #7
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    Grandad's secret formula.

    - 1 Ltr Boiled Linseed Oil

    - 1 Ltr Pure Gum Turpentine

    - finely grated piece of beeswax about the size of a hen's egg

    Mix it all together, let it sit for a couple of days for everything to soften together. Shake well before applying.

    Apply heavily and allow to soak in overnight, wipe up the excess and return to the jar for next time.

    Allow to dry and buff lightly with a soft cloth. Reapply every year or so as required.

    Beautiful surface to work on, not slippery at all.

    Keep the jar in a cool place. It will last for years.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
    See here for details:
    https://www.woodworkforums.com/f303/...-2019-a-224305

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeCook View Post
    Hi guys

    Danish Oil is essentially a mixture of boilded linseed, polyurethane and turps. To avoid surface build up I think it should be applied as wipe-on rather than with a paint brush. And don't forget to coat all surfaces to stop uneven drying and timber movement. I like an extra coat on end grain and in the dog holes.

    Traditionalists may prefer to leave out the poly and put on some extra coats. Remember BLO dries slowly.

    Cheers

    Graeme
    I wonder if everyone agrees with sealing dog holes, I was thinking for a while asking if applying anything was a good idea.
    I have been using titebond drippings to seal timbers recently so thought I might ask also.
    Gonna give the Cosman "a better bench dog" bench dogs a go, but might try finding better springs.
    What do ya think? will applying anything whether it be a finish glue. or even both be a good idea based on the design?
    I made my dogs at 88 degrees like the Klausz plans if that comes into the equation.


    Tom

  10. #9
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    I used Organoil Danish Oil on mine.

    It doesn't have the poly mixed in and is just an oil finish. It's holding up really well so far. It will get a re-coat after my finished bench goes through it's first full wet season and I re-flatten it.
    The only issue is the very strong orange aroma that can take quite a while to dissipate. Ventilation is your friend when using this danish oil mix on a large surface.
    I, for one, like Roman Numerals

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug3030 View Post
    Grandad's secret formula.

    - 1 Ltr Boiled Linseed Oil

    - 1 Ltr Pure Gum Turpentine

    - finely grated piece of beeswax about the size of a hen's egg

    Mix it all together, let it sit for a couple of days for everything to soften together. Shake well before applying.

    Apply heavily and allow to soak in overnight, wipe up the excess and return to the jar for next time.

    Allow to dry and buff lightly with a soft cloth. Reapply every year or so as required.

    Beautiful surface to work on, not slippery at all.

    Keep the jar in a cool place. It will last for years.
    Doug3030

    Thanks for the recipe! Does it work for tool handles too?

    Yvan

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by yvan View Post
    Thanks for the recipe! Does it work for tool handles too?
    Absolutely

    I've used it on lathe tools, hammers, mallets, axes, brooms, mops etc

    If it's got a wooden handle and is at my place, it has had a coat of it.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
    See here for details:
    https://www.woodworkforums.com/f303/...-2019-a-224305

  13. #12
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    May 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug3030 View Post
    Grandad's secret formula.

    Apply heavily and allow to soak in overnight, wipe up the excess and return to the jar for next time.

    Allow to dry and buff lightly with a soft cloth. Reapply every year or so as required.

    Beautiful surface to work on, not slippery at all.

    Keep the jar in a cool place. It will last for years.
    Doug
    A bit of further clarification if you wouldn't mind.
    After allowing it to soak in over night what is left to wipe up and return to the jar?
    Also is the application done with a brush or some other method?
    Thanks

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huon pine fan View Post
    After allowing it to soak in over night what is left to wipe up and return to the jar?
    This only happens on large flat surfaces like the benchtop. Usually there is not too much once you get a feel for how much to put on. The message in the statement is really that if you put too much on it doesn't go to waste - if you really go overboard you can just put it back in the jar. Generally I find that any small excess on the benchtop, where it can pool, can be spread to other parts of the bench or wipe the cloth over some tool handles until it is used up..

    Quote Originally Posted by Huon pine fan View Post
    Also is the application done with a brush or some other method?
    Whatever you use to apply it, don't plan on using it again. It fairly ruins paint brushes and cloths, which is what I generally apply it with. $2 shop paint brushes work ok.
    Doug3030's Open Shed Day 2019 - Sunday 6 October 2019, Hoppers Crossing
    See here for details:
    https://www.woodworkforums.com/f303/...-2019-a-224305

  15. #14
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    Nov 2019
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    Hey Quinny01,

    I just finished a small roubo workbench (I'll post the build on here, so do keep an eye out) and basically finished the work surface with Livos Universal Oil (Danish Oil is basically the same), whilst the base and undercarriage were given several coats of Wattyl Estapol Tung Oil floor varnish, which is bombproof. That way the work surface wont have any glue sticking to it and is really easily recoatable, whilst the base will be tough as a basketball court.

    Cheers,
    SiggyKC

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