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  1. #16
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    Nathan, I understand

    Christopher has published an ebook -- the last of the Anarchists series -- which is available free here https://blog.lostartpress.com/wp-con...020_v5.1-1.pdf
    yes, Chris is actually giving the ebook away.

    Take a few days and have a read.


    On the tools required matter ...
    you could always purchase a DeWalt three knife DW735 and sell it after you finish the project.

    I'm assuming you will not be breaking down the wood you buy by hand.
    regards from Canada

    ian

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  3. #17
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    A good idea to consider insect attack (borers) when deciding on a suitable specie for the build.

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    Nathan, I understand

    Christopher has published an ebook -- the last of the Anarchists series -- which is available free here https://blog.lostartpress.com/wp-con...020_v5.1-1.pdf
    yes, Chris is actually giving the ebook away.

    Take a few days and have a read.


    On the tools required matter ...
    you could always purchase a DeWalt three knife DW735 and sell it after you finish the project.

    I'm assuming you will not be breaking down the wood you buy by hand.
    I did come across book recently and have the other workbench book written by him also. Much appreciated

    Thats right im after stock thats dressed or close too and seasoned / acclimatised so its where ive turned my attention recently. Going to check out a local saw mill locally Wednesday and get some sample stock

    Ideally the DAR will be mostly done and I take delivery in rough length and do final cuts and assembly, chiselling assembly by hand as ive done this before. Just not to keen on hauling of stock removal required from rough sawn by hand

    Will take a look at blackbutt as core timber and maybe some jarrah dressing pieces worked in somewhere

    Cheers
    Nathan

    Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk

  5. #19
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    Have price list and sketches. Plan time!

    Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk

  6. #20
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    Well Ok its approximately $2k worth of mixed Ash/ Reds DAR for the build so far.

    That's with the top being 130mmx 40 each with approx 40M in length. that's at $40 per LM DAR

    Legs and upper/ lower cross sections are all based around 110x40 DAR and that's $32 per LM DAR

    Vice and sliding dead man are approx $100 each with the size for vice 1000mm x 225x 60

    So that's pretty darn expensive. I have come across a supplier of timber slabs. If each slab is 60mm thick and approx 500 wide i like the idea of laminating two of them to be 120mm thick and rip to 450 or so x 2 so i have a split top Roubo

    I'm going to assume there's a good reason a laminated bench top material is turned on its side for stability, would two laminated slabs warp or would it matter on the area the slab was cut from? convex/concave or pith or bark side?

    Cheers,
    Nathan

  7. #21
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    Nathan, just for comparison: when I built my bench 8 years ago now, the European Oak top came for perhaps $300. This was rough sawn 4x2s. The top ended up 22' wide x 6'6" long (without the tail vise cap), and 3 1/2" thick.



    The Jarrah base came from recycled roofing, and the cost was nil, but that is besides the point here. It is the top that is relevant.

    I like the top very much and, if I had to build another bench (no!!), it would have a Tassie Oak top. I do not know the cost of that, but it cannot be as much as European Oak. Can it?

    $2000 is a lot for a bench material-wise. I could go out and purchase a whole lot of Rock Maple for that. I have a memory of spending around that when I built our kitchen 3 years ago.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by delbs View Post
    Well Ok its approximately $2k worth of mixed Ash/ Reds DAR for the build so far.

    That's with the top being 130mmx 40 each with approx 40M in length. that's at $40 per LM DAR

    Legs and upper/ lower cross sections are all based around 110x40 DAR and that's $32 per LM DAR

    Vice and sliding dead man are approx $100 each with the size for vice 1000mm x 225x 60

    So that's pretty darn expensive. I have come across a supplier of timber slabs. If each slab is 60mm thick and approx 500 wide i like the idea of laminating two of them to be 120mm thick and rip to 450 or so x 2 so i have a split top Roubo

    I'm going to assume there's a good reason a laminated bench top material is turned on its side for stability, would two laminated slabs warp or would it matter on the area the slab was cut from? convex/concave or pith or bark side?
    Nathan

    No need to assume.
    Strips are typically cut from slabs, or boards, and arranged so that the resulting material is orientated so that the grain is nearer vertical than horizontal. This minimises the amount of warping your bench top will experience.

    Note that a 130 x 40 board (nominal 6" x 2") will yield 2 strips each about 40 wide and 60 mm deep.
    starting with a 180 x 40 (nominal 8" x 2") board will yield 3 strips each about 40 wide and 60 mm deep.

    Holdfasts typically need a minimum bench depth of 45 mm to wedge themselves into.


    apart from the resulting look in the finished bench, there is no reason that your strips, when turned on edge, need to be a consistent width.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  9. #23
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    Nathan
    Do you have a table saw of sorts, or a track saw, or a parallel edge guide for your circular saw?

    Will require a fair amount of glue, but 4 of these Tassie Oak finger jointed DAR panels from the green shed -- cut into 9 strips each -- will yield the hardwood for your split top Roubo for about $300 total
    link Timberbuild 1800 x 600 x 19mm Tasmanian Oak Feature Grade Panel


    use construction pine, equivalent to Derek's jarrah roof beams -- i.e. cheap -- for the base.


    if you must have contrasting timber, you could buy some of these 1800 x 600 x 18mm Spotted Gum Laminated Panel | Bunnings Warehouse



    According to my search of the Green Shed's website, these are $79.95 a panel
    regards from Canada

    ian

  10. #24
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    Ahh Ian you made me remember the photos i had taken a few weeks back (had to change phones so forgot about them) at the big green one of all the hardwood pre made panels i found.

    Given that im approaching this from a hand tool perspective and not focus on the dimension from rough to dar like i did the first couple benches ive built this is now an attractive option for me to consider.

    If i just find the appropriate material to laminate and dimension myself for the legs and supports then having material like this for the bench laminated together would be pretty good to accelerate me closer to just focusing on the joints and assembly.

    20201011_145948.jpg20201011_145953.jpg20201011_145955 (1).jpg20201011_150456.jpg20201011_150504.jpg

  11. #25
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    This also looks like a solid Leg vice for the roubo

    Leg Vice Hardware Kit

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by delbs View Post
    Ahh Ian you made me remember the photos i had taken a few weeks back (had to change phones so forgot about them) at the big green one of all the hardwood pre made panels i found.

    Given that im approaching this from a hand tool perspective and not focus on the dimension from rough to dar like i did the first couple benches ive built this is now an attractive option for me to consider.

    If i just find the appropriate material to laminate and dimension myself for the legs and supports then having material like this for the bench laminated together would be pretty good to accelerate me closer to just focusing on the joints and assembly.

    20201011_145948.jpg20201011_145953.jpg20201011_145955 (1).jpg20201011_150456.jpg20201011_150504.jpg
    Nathan
    cutting the FJ hardwood panels into strips and then face laminating will give you the "bench of your dreams" at considerably less cost than building same from DAR hardwood.

    For the legs you should consider laminating 6 x 19 mm strips (equals 114 mm) in a way that results in a "mortice" for the long stretcher and a "tenon" for the mortice you will chop (sort of) into the bench top. If you decide to use a 26 mm thick panel, 5 strips (= 130 mm thick) will yield you a 5 and a bit inch thick leg.
    Look at the Anarchist's workbench PDF I linked to above for a better description of how to do this.


    Just be a bit wary of "oiled panels" -- removing the oil so that you can face glue the strips may be more trouble (and cost a bomb in solvent) than it's worth.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  13. #27
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    This is very useful, thanks a lot.

    Considering my options i think this would be the most accessible and satisfying for me to do. I have a track for circular saw and the ability to laminate a bench and legs made out of this material. Off to the green shed i go to get some more prices.

    Ill avoid the oiled version for now, found an ash panel i didnt mind so will look at my options.

    Also i have the pdf and am reading through it. much appreciated mate.

    Nathan

  14. #28
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    i Picked up the first two panels for the bench top. They only had two in stock for the dimensions i was after so decided to get them which would trigger another stock level re-order and ill pick up more when they're next in stock

    bunnings_roubo.jpg

    When i was quoting the other materials that resulted being 2k worth i was basing the top dimensions off it being a split top roubo and each side was 1800x400x120. the thickness i may vary.

    So just to clarify are you all suggesting i should laminate N number of boards and then rip the 400 into strips that then are all rotated to re-laminate the faces. So ill essentially have an endgrain bench top? or am i misunderstanding something there?

    Found a number of 3m lengths of Tassy oak DAR there 130 x 19mm x 3000 for $57 each. i like the idea of laminating them for the lower lengths but pretty expensive stock so will keep an eye out. They also have Meranti DAR but that seems more appropriate for door jams etc is a super lightweight material

    Cheers,
    Nathan
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by delbs View Post
    I Picked up the first two panels for the bench top. They only had two in stock for the dimensions i was after so decided to get them which would trigger another stock level re-order and ill pick up more when they're next in stock

    When i was quoting the other materials that resulted being 2k worth i was basing the top dimensions off it being a split top roubo and each side was 1800x400x120. the thickness i may vary.

    So just to clarify are you all suggesting i should laminate N number of boards and then rip the 400 into strips that then are all rotated to re-laminate the faces. So ill essentially have an endgrain bench top? or am I misunderstanding something there?
    I'm suggesting that you rip the 19 mm thick panel into 5 or 6 strips. These strips are then face laminated to give you your bench top. After allowing for the 3 mm saw kerf, 5 strips from a 405 panel will yield a top that should finish at 75 mm thick. 6 strips would finish at about 63 mm thick. Starting with a panel 19 mm thick, 6 strips per panel times two panels should yield a bench slab around 230 wide x around 63 mm thick. 5 strips per panel should yield a top around 195 wide and 75 mm thick.
    Either way you will need about 6 FJ panels for the top.

    Quote Originally Posted by delbs View Post
    Found a number of 3m lengths of Tassy oak DAR there 130 x 19mm x 3000 for $57 each. i like the idea of laminating them for the lower lengths but pretty expensive stock so will keep an eye out. They also have Meranti DAR but that seems more appropriate for door jams etc is a super lightweight material
    keep reading the PDF of Chris's bench book.
    pay particular attention to how he suggests the tenons and mortices be constructed.

    The "advantage" of the FJ hardwood panels is that they can be cut and laminated in a way that produces a 38 mm thick tenon, with a 19 mm wide shoulder (total rail width 57 mm). Or you could up the tenon to 45 mm (1 x 26, 1 x 19) and keep the shoulder at 19 mm -- a total rail width of 64 mm.

    by my calculations, in terms of $/cube, the 3 metre lengths of Tassie Oak DAR (130 x 19) are about 2 x the price of the FJ panels.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  16. #30
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    I used two of the Merbau panels to build a smaller, moving bench/assembly table ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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