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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
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    9,885

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    Time to use the slider. THIS is what the parallel guide on the slider can do. It is like a Fritz & Franz jig on steroids ...


    With the case done, the next step is to prepare the boards for the drawer blades/frames. I have found a chunk of Jarrah, about 50mm thick and 180mm wide and about 950mm long. This needs to be sliced up into 50mm wide boards (which will be further reduced to 12mm thick drawer blades.


    Place the board against the parallel guide ...





    ... and rip one side to 50mm ...





    Now rip the second length ...








    .. and the third. How safe is a slider? This is where one stands - well away from any possible kickback (which does not occur on a slider, anyway. And the hands are no where near the blade ...





    How good are the saw cuts? Good enough to joint with, and not require a jointer for the edges.


    Here is the board ...





    Close up ...





    But ...








    Regards from Perth


    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,885

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    The Rebate

    A rebate can be made with a handheld router, router table, table saw, a handsaw and chisel, and a hand plane such as a moving fillister. My preference is the latter.

    What can be more simple than a fillister plane along an edge? Well, the plane needs to be set up, especially when planing interlocked grain, as we have here. And before this can take place, the case needs to be prepared if the desired result is an accurate - flush and square - rebate.

    The first step is to level and square the front and back edges of the case. My plane of choice here is a small bevel up plane with a high cutting angle. It is low like a block plane for easy handling, which is helpful when the case is high on the bench ...



    The case is 18mm (3/4") thick. The rebate will be 7mm deep x 12mm wide. This will allow for a 6mm thick rear panel.

    The cabinet will have four rows of drawers, with the lowermost row running on the bottom of the case. It is important that this surface is perfectly flat in order that the drawers run smoothly. The boards making up the sides were flat out of the packaging. Certainly flat enough for a case, but not quite flat enough for drawers to run on with the level of precision desired here. They need further work ...

    The case is pulled apart, and the lower panel is traversed. Note that the surface is first covered in pencil scribble to monitor where the high- and low points are ...



    A straight edge and a longer plane are used here ...



    The blade here is slightly cambered to avoid leaving track lines. A very light surfacing is completed with a smoother, more to remove any fuzz than to level ...



    The moving fillister of choice is the Veritas Skew Rabbet Plane ...



    Those familiar with this plane will note that the front knob has been removed. My preference is to rest my thumb on that spot and apply downforce, while the palm applies force against the side of the plane. Here is an example from another build ...



    This fillister has a deeper subfence. The depth stop knob has also been slotted for ensure that it has been tightened securely ...



    The plane is generally only set up to slice with the knicker ahead of the blade when planing across the grain. However, the Merbau used here has especially interlocked grain, and the nicker it employed to prevent spelching on the shoulders.



    Here, the nicker is a smidgeon outside the body of the plane. The skewed blade lies in-line with the nicker. This has another purpose, which is to cut into the lower corner of the rebate and keep it clean and square. Otherwise it would allow waste to build there, and the inside would create a slope.

    In addition to the line created by the nicker, a cutting gauge is run along the rebate boundary. This may be used after or during the rebate is cut to clean out the inside corner.

    One last item of preparation is, following marking out the rebate (again with a cutting gauge), the lower boundary line is highlighted with blue painter's tape. This is simply to aid in monitoring the plane as it gets close to the line.

    This is what the shavings from fairly straight-grained wood looks like ...



    This is the result when the grain is significantly interlocked ...



    The case is dovetailed with mitres at each corner. There are two benefits for this: the first is aesthetic; the second is that it permits the panels to be rebated through the full length (otherwise stopped rebates are needed) ...



    Here is a better glimpse of the grain direction ...



    The case back is done ...



    The finish we were looking for ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,177

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    -- Spelching
    -- Mitred dovetails with through rebates

    I learned one new word and one new technique!

    I love watching you work. Its incredible.

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
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    Thanks Evan. You do make my head swell!

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Redlands area, Brisbane
    Posts
    1,342

    Default

    Mate! As in most other things, you're on another level to my workshop furniture!

    IMG_0204.jpg IMG_0206.jpg

    This is one of those Czech workbenches that Carbatec used to sell. Nothing special but it does the job.

    There was a cabinet that came with it but it was fairly useless so I built the drawers to go inside the original cabinet. Again nothing special. Bunnings plywood, butt joints, screws and biscuits and Tasmanian Oak edge banding. I used hot hide glue rub joints to glue on the edge banding so I would not need to clamp them.

    Sanded the drawer faces with a drum sander and the finish is Livos straight off the sander.

    I've started reorganising the drawers with tool holders. They are covered in this thread: Tool drawer organisation

    I was going to build a board jack but with this I've discovered I do not need one. Between the different drawer heights and handle heights, I pretty much have all my board jack needs covered.

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
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    Default Dados

    The case is a dry fit. Above the case is the outlay of the drawer blades for the drawers. Inside the case is the template (story stick) made to mark out the dados. The dados will be 12mm wide and 6mm deep ...





    The template is alternated for each side, which ensures that they are marked at exactly the same position ..





    The knife lines are deepened and undercut with a chisel to create a wall for a saw ..





    A straight edge is clamped along the knife line, and a kerf is created with an azebiki saw ...





    The waste can then be removed with a router plane ...





    Why do it this way, and not use a power router or tablesaw? I believe that I can be more precise with hand tools. This includes the positioning and fine tuning of the dados.


    The router plane's depth stop is set to 5mm, and this is reached incrementally ...





    The final 1mm cut (to a depth of 6mm) is made by a smaller router plane ..





    The reason for this is that, as with a smoother, which follows the undulations of a panel and removes the least about of material, so this small router plane will create an even depth.


    The depth is checked ...





    Any waste in the corners is removed with a side rebate plane (this is one from Veritas). be careful not to remove waste from the upper edge as this will change the position of the dado. The side rebate plane is the only plane which can plane along the inside edge of a dado or groove. It is used to increase the width of the dado - but if doing this, only remove waste from the upper edge side of the dado.





    Test the fit as you go ...





    Once done ...





    ... the surfaces are sanded to 240 grit. This is an original (!) Festool sander, when it was still "Festo"! I have had this about 25 years. Heavy, but works well for this task.





    A final test for the accuracy is to align the sides ...





    ... and then run a drawer blade across both dados ...





    Time to glue up


    Regards from Perth


    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,177

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    As an edit to my post above, let me add that sometimes I really DISLIKE your posts....

    --> side rebate plane



    That has gone and cost me money! I now have a problem I didn't think I had and JUST before Christmas too.... now, how in the world am I going to pull off 'Ol Santa sneaking that into the sack.....

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Redlands area, Brisbane
    Posts
    1,342

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    As an edit to my post above, let me add that sometimes I really DISLIKE your posts....

    --> side rebate plane



    That has gone and cost me money! I now have a problem I didn't think I had and JUST before Christmas too.... now, how in the world am I going to pull off 'Ol Santa sneaking that into the sack.....
    It's not a tool one uses a lot.

    McJing have a Luban which is similar to the Record 2506 (I have one of those) for $118.

    I have a set of Stanley 98/99 planes as well. Mine are in similar condition to these: Stanley No 98 & 99 Side Rabbet Planes - Tool Exchange But I would not charge you anything like the near $400 they're asking!

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,885

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    As an edit to my post above, let me add that sometimes I really DISLIKE your posts....

    --> side rebate plane



    That has gone and cost me money! I now have a problem I didn't think I had and JUST before Christmas too.... now, how in the world am I going to pull off 'Ol Santa sneaking that into the sack.....


    Try and find a Stanley #79. I have one with an extra fence. These are double-ended (can go both directions), and make excellent sliding dovetail planes as well ...

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...Stanley79.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
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    Default

    Stop it you rats!

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    51
    Posts
    2,624

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    Quote Originally Posted by markharrison View Post
    McJing have a Luban which is similar to the Record 2506 (I have one of those) for $118.
    IanW did a write up on the Luban back in 2016; read it HERE. I own an early US 79 (pre-fence model) and its a great piece of kit; I had one of our Guild members using it last week for widening out a groove in a pair of drawer sides instead of trying to fine tune the fence on a 14 table saw to do the same job.

    Oh; unashamedly: SQUEAK!
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Redlands area, Brisbane
    Posts
    1,342

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Stop it you rats!
    We love you too man!

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    9,885

    Default Glueing Up

    I don't know about you, but I face glueing up with mixed feelings. On the positive side, it is great to have reached a milestone. But then the fears creep in .. will it come together like the dry fit ... what if I get something upside down ... yeah, you know I have done this!


    I get everything ready ... glue (Titemark Liquid Hide Glue) and spatula ... clamps ... mallet ... wet rag ...





    The bench is wiped down and covered in old newspapers ...





    Both pin boards receive a generous amount of glue at the same time (all surfaces) ...





    No glue is added to the tail board, with the exception of the mitres.





    The two pin boards are inserted into the mutual tail board, and then the exposed pins receive their glue ...





    Lastly, the remaining tail board is attached, and all corners are hammered down ...





    Any glue spills and runs are immediately removed with a wet rag. I have not had a problem with finish doing it this way. I am more concerned that dry glue will act as a barrier to stain or finish, and that removing it will damage the surface.





    The case is now clamped. Happily, all is square and no adjustments are needed.





    Once dry, the case is checked for square once again. It is necessary to hold one's breath at this point.


    All is square ...





    ... and in all directions ...





    Continue breathing.


    Time to flatten the outside of the case. The choice of smoother is an HNT Gordon with a 60 degree cutting angle. This low plane will make it easier to plane with the case high on the bench, and it can be pulled for extra leverage ..





    Perhaps sacrilegiously for some, the case is now sanded (80/120/240 grits) as the plan is to stain the wood to match the Jarrah drawer fronts.





    And then we are done ...





    ... and ready for the drawer blades.


    Regards from Perth


    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

  15. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Redlands area, Brisbane
    Posts
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    At least with hide glue, you get a reasonable open time and foul ups with tricky glue ups are reversible.

  16. #30
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    Apr 2001
    Location
    Perth
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    True, Mark. Longer open time, and reversible ... both needed, and the latter appreciated (don’t ask!). But also, liquid Hide Glue cleans up so easily with water.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Visit www.inthewoodshop.com for tutorials on constructing handtools, handtool reviews, and my trials and tribulations with furniture builds.

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