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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    kureelpa
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    Well it now wears a roof. It wasn't cheap but I reckon it was worth every cent because I didn't have to do it or pay for it, how good is that? IMG_0108.jpgIMG_0109.jpgIMG_0110.jpg I had stated that when the roof and cladding went on, the shed would blend into the background and much to my surprise, I was right, it no longer looks like a big pile of randomly arranged sticks of wood even with just a roof being added and the sister in law is happy as. We are taking a weekend off so the cladding, which is now wood grained Hardieplank on the sides you can see and flat FC sheeting elsewhere, will just have to wait a week.
    The stepped in end is for a water tank and I cant help thinking that maybe we should have put it in place before the build.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Towradgi
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    4,505

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    Quote Originally Posted by THE BARON View Post
    The stepped in end is for a water tank and I cant help thinking that maybe we should have put it in place before the build.
    Yep!
    Pat
    Work is a necessary evil to be avoided. Mark Twain

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Elizabeth Bay / Oberon NSW
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    71
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    534

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    Back to termites for a minute. In my experience, a thick layer of crusher dust ($15/ton from a quarry) around the perimeter of the slab is enough to keep the critters out. A hardwood frame set close to the bush is like an open invitation for a feast.

    Great shed BTW.

    mick

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
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    64
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE BARON View Post
    Lightning shed build-img_0110-jpg The stepped in end is for a water tank and I cant help thinking that maybe we should have put it in place before the build.
    Perhaps hire a biggish crane to install the water tank?


    BTW, around here (look at my signature line) even sheds are fully insulated and wrapped.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    kureelpa
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    61
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    IMG_0120.jpgIMG_0116.jpgIMG_0118.jpgWell after a shortened weekend due to rain, which all of us on tanks were happy to have, the cladding is under way. Why, when you pay quite a large sum of money for something, does a company think they own the rights to advertise on your building for even, in this case, a short period of time. Of course you can't see the printing until you start wrapping it around the walls, otherwise I'd be asking for a very large discount at point of purchase. Anyway enough of my pet hates. Sheet cladding 90% done, although still needs full nailing on some sections, and the first and most important line of Hardieplank in place, get that perfect and everything else just happens. The sheets were coiled nailed on which does speed things up but requires a bit of trial and error on old scraps of fibro and off cuts of framing to get the exact air pressure. We had it down to 80% perfect, 15% requiring a hit with a hammer and the rest slightly over driven. Just a warning, if you miss the stud it isn't pretty but nothing a bit of bog wont fix.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
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    64
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    Curious
    It's going to pretty dark in that shed. Why are the windows so small? Working inside will require lighting 24/7.


    When I mentioned "fully insulated and wrapped", around here sheds like yours would be:
    1. sheathed in OSB
    2. wrapped
    3. covered in the external cladding of choice
    4. insulated with rigid foam or similar between the studs
    Last edited by ian; 14th Oct 2019 at 04:28 AM. Reason: added point 4 about insulation
    regards from Canada

    ian

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
    Posts
    1,040

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    Re the advertising. Everything has it on to some degree or other. Plywood and lumber stamps, plumbing pipe and fixtures, insulation, roof membrane, inside kitchen cabinets, you name and it likely has it. Their logic is that they are discounting it with the logo on it already. Take the logo off and watch the costs go up.

    Now when it comes to buying a car I tell the salesman that if there is any dealer badges or decals stuck on the car I won't buy it. I'll tolerate a licence plate holder with their name on it (because I can remove it) but that's it. They begrudgingly comply but they want you to drive around telling the world where the car was bought. That's my pet peeve.

    I'm enjoying the build pictures.

    Pete

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    kureelpa
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    61
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    49

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    Gday Ian, windows in sheds can be the subject of much debate. Those two small windows are north facing and that is why they are small. Although it is the done thing to have big north facing windows in houses to allow the winter sun to warm the living areas, if your standing at a bench working with the direct sun pouring in things are going to get very uncomfortable very quickly. If its 7 degrees it may be nice but in Queensland its more likely to be 20 degrees in the shade. With regards to the amount of natural light in a work space I'm not sure it really matters. I have just come down from my shed where I was working at a bench 3 metres away from 4.5 x 2.7 metre opening with a 1.8 x 1.5 window behind me, its a bright sunny day and the two LED tubes over the benches were on. Light coming from the sides causes shadows and once you hit sixty those shadows just get darker.

    When it comes to insulation its more about heat than cold here and can actually be a double edged sword, it works well if you're there to control whats happening but left to its own devices it can have a few annoying traits. Example, I own a holiday house which is fully insulated and if you turn up at lunchtime on a winters day with an outside temp of 23 degrees, upon opening the door you will find out what the temp was at 5am, its like walking into a coldroom. Without people to add or subtract heat, insulation works the opposite to what you want.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Elizabeth Bay / Oberon NSW
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    71
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    534

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    Bit late now that your roof in on, but...I included a half sheet of opal polycarbonate every two metres to provide natural light. It works great!

    Insulation depends entirely on location. My normal winter mornings near Oberon are -9C.

    mick

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glider View Post
    Insulation depends entirely on location. My normal winter mornings near Oberon are -9C.
    around here, -9C is mid afternoon on a "sunny day". You quickly get used to it.



    but I do get what you are saying.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  11. #26
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    Jan 2008
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    kureelpa
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    Gday Glider, a stack of metal ceiling battens delivered with the cladding suggests the ceiling is going to be fully lined [ I'm pretty quick at picking up on things like that ] so the poycarbonate sheet wont work in this case. However the brother has said he may install a couple of the modern version of the old solar tube style skylights once he has the set out of the shed finalised. These are a solar panel wired to a large diameter LED light, which has to be better then cutting large holes in your roof and ceiling. Place panel on roof, run wire under ridge cap into ceiling, small hole through ceiling lining to light and its done. Sounds good but does anybody have any experience with these and are they worth the $350 or so they cost. Actually when I think about it that money would probably run a mains powered Led light for a couple of years. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Nsw
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    59
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    495

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    I have no experience with the solar light but another option would be to just buy a solar panel, a battery and some 12v lights. It will give you at least what the solar light will give you plus light on cloudy days and at night
    It won’t replace your mains powered lights but might be of more value to you.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    brisbane
    Posts
    25

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    We have a solar skylight it’s been in the kids bathroom for at least 3 years if not 4 with no signs of drama I quite like it. It’s not a bright light but is more than adequate for use In The bathroom plus it is like a skylight when sunlight goes down the light goes down, not sure that would be good in the workshop though but I’m sure there’s different models for different applications. We will be putting another one in laundry at some stage soon. Ours was bought from Bunnings for about $300 and is about 400mm square

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
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    5,921

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    Quote Originally Posted by THE BARON View Post
    Gday Glider, a stack of metal ceiling battens delivered with the cladding suggests the ceiling is going to be fully lined [ I'm pretty quick at picking up on things like that ] so the poycarbonate sheet wont work in this case. However the brother has said he may install a couple of the modern version of the old solar tube style skylights once he has the set out of the shed finalised. These are a solar panel wired to a large diameter LED light, which has to be better then cutting large holes in your roof and ceiling. Place panel on roof, run wire under ridge cap into ceiling, small hole through ceiling lining to light and its done. Sounds good but does anybody have any experience with these and are they worth the $350 or so they cost. Actually when I think about it that money would probably run a mains powered Led light for a couple of years. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
    Any chance to avoid a roof penetration should be grabbed with both hands. We have two solar tubes installed many years ago and recently leaks started and they might leak again for all I know. I am tempted to pull them out and put solar/LED in as the tubes run through my workshop to a basement room underneath and it will free up room in the WS. Also it allows the lights to be placed in optimal positions instead of where they are now. We had a solar fan installed at the same time and it has continued to operate faultlessly over a period of about 8 years. I

    f I was building a shed again it would have two rooves, one over the other with an air space between them. This would allow the hot air that resulted from the sun hitting the outer layer to be vented from between the layers. it might be a bit more expensive but internal roof insulation should not be needed as the inner layer would not be impacted subject to direct sun exposure. Why someone has not come up with a production version of this is a mystery to me.
    CHRIS

  15. #30
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    Feb 2003
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    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE BARON View Post
    [solar powered lights] Sound good but does anybody have any experience with these and are they worth the $350 or so they cost. Actually when I think about it that money would probably run a mains powered Led light for a couple of years. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
    my calculations are that if you run LED lights 12 hours per day, each installed 4000 lumen light will cost around 12 cents/day to run. (Electricity priced at 25 cents/kWh)
    The lights themselves should be available for about $50 or less.
    4000 lumens is likely to be far brighter than what a solar powered jobbie puts out.

    Me, I'd pay for mains powered lights arranged in a way that allows only those needed right now to be switched on.
    regards from Canada

    ian

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