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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Hunter Valley
    Age
    51
    Posts
    833

    Default

    Before you tear down your existing colourbond shed, consider the one advantage of colourbond is that it's already in a position to repel all rain, and it's likely to be designed/engineered to withstand wind, rain and other inclement weather.

    The second advantage is that it's already approved, and you don't run the risk of a neighbour not liking your replacement and trying to make life difficult with council etc - even though you are likely right and don't need approval for anything under 20sqm, that does also depend on how many other "under 20sqm" things you have in NSW, and you'd be surprised at what counts toward that (verandah, pergola, etc)

    I get that the inside is also not to your liking, neither is mine - so for some ideas, take a look at this thread-in-progress that details how we're setting up our existing colourbond shed to become lined, have electrical/water/gas services and so on: Midnight's Shed

    Early days on our build yet, but if you have any questions on this and our plans, please don't hesitate to ask!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    The existing shed is going for a number of reasons...

    The roof is pretty crumpled (an arborist dropped a huge branch on it) and it's full of little dents from falling gum tree branches.

    I won't go into details on all the other stuff with colorbond sheds we all know the cons, would rather start from scratch and I have at least $10k for the budget.

    I'm not sure why anyone would object to an identically sized wooden shed replacing a green colorbond one.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Dubbo
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi rthorntn,
    I've taken the liberty of doing a quick drawing of what I see as the bones of your idea.
    I've been in the building industry for the last 40 odd years (chippie, builder, draftsman, truss and frame manufacturer).
    Re-building on the existing slab should be no problem - PROVIDED you have a chat with the neighbours and then write down everything that was discussed. Just in case of any future objections.
    Also just check with your local council.
    Now, back to the shed. Use 90x45 mgp10 H2 for top & bottom plates, corner studs, support studs for the 150ub and for the rafters. For the rest of the frame, 90x35 mgp10 H2 will do the job.
    You can put a door up to 1220 wide (used double studs each side) anywhere in the frame - except the 2.2m high wall. This wall needs to be taller to fit a door in.
    The row of noggins around the bottom allows for the raised floor inside.

    I hope this gives you a bit of inspiration


  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Adelaide - outer south
    Age
    63
    Posts
    583

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    Dth1,
    That's a comprehensive post - well worth waiting 6 years for .
    Cheers, Bob the labrat

    Measure once and.... the phone rings!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Dubbo
    Posts
    6

    Default

    6 Years??
    I thought it just started a couple of days ago!

    Any how, rthorntn also touched on how to poke a hole in a wall and still have it lockable and weather tight.
    This does mean a bit more work than hacking into the wall with a recipro saw.
    The sketches below should give a few clues on how planning ahead is important ie. not putting studs where a hole has to go
    Also giving consideration on using a heavy duty sill flashing in preference to a light weight one fixed to the face of the noggin.
    And if anyone thinks I'm a Yank because of the weatherboards, It is some stuff we sell through work. So simple to put up that even the apprentices generally get it right the first time around.

    Wall Opening.JPG

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,276

    Default

    A really simple alternative to a hatch is a small sliding window installed at the right height as this at least allows opening from the inside.
    I've even seen one with an adjustable height roller on the inside sill.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thank you DTH1, the drawings are AWESOME. I was thinking of having the outside door going into the 800mm wide office, that runs along the 2.2m wall (double doors would probably be overkill for anything that I'm going to need to get into the shed and I want the long walls in the main workshop area to all be useable for benches), being a shed I can probably get away with the door being a little smaller than regulation?

    Thank you BobL, yeah a window is a great idea. Maybe a nearly 2m long thin window running along the wall between 150UB and the 3m high wall, I can rip most bits of plywood through that, I know it's a bit out there but I'm keen for ideas on how design a window like that.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    69
    Posts
    7,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DTH1 View Post
    6 Years??
    I thought it just started a couple of days ago!
    DTH1

    I think Bob was referring to your first foray into posting (your join date was 2013?). However, I believe he was being complimentary as your first (and second) post is a ripper and something we would normally expect from a veteran of many thousands of posts. I hope we will see much more from you as time goes on.

    Excellent

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    69
    Posts
    7,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    A really simple alternative to a hatch is a small sliding window installed at the right height as this at least allows opening from the inside.
    I've even seen one with an adjustable height roller on the inside sill.
    Bob

    Very good point. If you are going to have a hole in the wall make it a window or a door so that it is always serving some purpose even if you are not poking long lengths of timber through it. be sure to check the height is compatible with your machinery.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I've even seen one with an adjustable height roller on the inside sill.
    Thanks BobL do you have any links, photos, drawings or a description of this, sounds like a great idea?

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,276

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    Quote Originally Posted by rthorntn View Post
    Thanks BobL do you have any links, photos, drawings or a description of this, sounds like a great idea?
    I think I still have the email address of the bloke who set it up - twas some time ago - and will contact him and ask him to send me a photo.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Dubbo
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    DTH1

    I think Bob was referring to your first foray into posting (your join date was 2013?). However, I believe he was being complimentary as your first (and second) post is a ripper and something we would normally expect from a veteran of many thousands of posts. I hope we will see much more from you as time goes on.

    Excellent

    Regards
    Paul

    Thanks Paul, that makes sense. I was looking for guidance for making a coffin for our beloved cat Charlotte. Ended up with CCA stabilised spaulted pine, glass lid, sprung base (for comfort) and fully lined.
    Been lurking and sucking up info ever since.
    This thread is one I can contribute to in a practical way.

    Sorry for the sidetrack.


    Regarding using a window for a usable opening in a wall, consider making it a double hung (slides up and down).
    This will give you the full width of the window opening to use with less chance of breaking the glass.
    To have a wide thin window, select an Awning style - like the flap in the drawings above.
    The opening over needs a head to distribute the wall/roof/wind loads. In this case a minimum of 2/90x45 mgp10 would do.
    However, plan ahead. If you're likely to hang cupboards on the wall above the window, 2/120x35 mgp12 would handle the basic construction.
    On the other hand (so many options ), if you want to line the shed with ply, MDF etc, you won't need these, as the sheeting becomes the load sharing member.

    Regards
    David

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    2,325

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Man View Post
    Before you tear down your existing colourbond shed, consider the one advantage of colourbond is that it's already in a position to repel all rain, and it's likely to be designed/engineered to withstand wind, rain and other inclement weather.

    The second advantage is that it's already approved, and you don't run the risk of a neighbour not liking your replacement and trying to make life difficult with council etc - even though you are likely right and don't need approval for anything under 20sqm, ........
    Really good advice from MM. Councils and neighbours have capacity to delay massively, even if you eventually win.

    Another option is to "repair" the old shed. Very fine distinction between repairing and replacing - like gand dad's axe. But it is always worth involving the neighbours - "
    "want to make the shed look better ......"

    Biggest mistake I made when I bought my place 30 years ago was not checking the concrete in the shed floor. Put a level over it, Put a straight edge over it. Is it absolutely flat and level? If not, I suggest that your first task should be to either:
    • Get professional concreter to skim existing floor, or
    • Install level joists and lay yellow tongue floor.

    Yellow tongue will be much nicer to walk and work on than concrete. Now I have too much stuff in shed to realistically fix floor - its a real PIA!

    Cheers

    Graeme

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