Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 54
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    GOSFORD NSW
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Great little set up. Very little sweeping up for you.
    Having zero luck tracking down FenceFurniture.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    2,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TERMALERT View Post
    Having zero luck tracking down FenceFurniture.
    He is a user on the forum

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,380

    Default

    The last thing you want around a drill press and drill bits is the hose or dust port getting in the way of the drill bit or work piece.
    A Bell mouth Hood connected to a DC works really well in these situations.



    O course if you are using a vacuum cleaner the much lower total air flow means you have to get the suction closer to the drilling action.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North of the coathanger, Sydney
    Age
    64
    Posts
    9,415

    Default

    I use the dewalt extreme 2 metal drill bits for endgrain regularly. My set goes up to 1/2". I don't know if bigger sizes are available
    but they are brilliant drill bits
    they look like this
    regards
    Nick
    veni, vidi,
    tornavi
    Without wood it's just ...

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North of the coathanger, Sydney
    Age
    64
    Posts
    9,415

    Default

    I use the dewalt extreme 2 metal drill bits for endgrain regularly. My set goes up to 1/2". I don't know if bigger sizes are available
    but they are brilliant drill bits
    they look like this
    Screen Shot 03-20-18 at 08.26 PM.PNG
    regards
    Nick
    veni, vidi,
    tornavi
    Without wood it's just ...

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    GOSFORD NSW
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Loving the input here. Thanks again.
    Now, slightly off topic but part of the same process.
    I have recently bought a new in box mitre saw supplied with what I believe to be a junk 305mm blade.
    Very slow going just slicing off 300mm sections of 70mmx35mm radiata pine.
    I was borrowing a neighbour's small Ryobi mitre saw and it was like a hot knife through butter.
    I can 'feel' the 305mm's bluntness ( or rather lack of manufactural sharpness ) because I have to slowly
    push it through the timber piece.
    Before I rush out and throw $100 at a new blade, does sound like the supplied blade is not particularly sharp ?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Little River
    Age
    73
    Posts
    872

    Default

    Just a suggestion - check that the blade is not on backwards and the nut is tight.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    29
    Posts
    4,980

    Default

    The blade might be a zero or negative rake, in which case it will take more effort to push no matter how sharp it is. That being said, it shouldn't struggle through pine.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North of the coathanger, Sydney
    Age
    64
    Posts
    9,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bohdan View Post
    Just a suggestion - check that the blade is not on backwards and the nut is tight.
    done that!
    regards
    Nick
    veni, vidi,
    tornavi
    Without wood it's just ...

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    GOSFORD NSW
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Blade set in correct direction and tight.
    It's quite possible that I have been comparing oranges to apples.
    All else being equal will an 80 tooth cut faster than a 100 tooth ?
    I have been ignoring this aspect.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TERMALERT View Post
    Blade set in correct direction and tight.
    It's quite possible that I have been comparing oranges to apples.
    All else being equal will an 80 tooth cut faster than a 100 tooth ?
    I have been ignoring this aspect.
    80 and 100 toothed blades will cut WAAAAAY slower than 24 or 40 toothed blades.

    80 ad 100 toothed blades are meant to cut slowly and produce a fine finish

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    GOSFORD NSW
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Official and unreserved apology to Sam at Swart Tools.
    I was comparing apples to oranges and blaming you for it.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Carine WA
    Age
    70
    Posts
    679

    Default

    Hi

    I'd suggest you consider an auger bit like this one if you can obtain the size you need. This helps clear the chips from the hole better than a twist drill. The link is to an extra long auger, 230mm.

    A "TRUE" brad point bit is harder to grind without a thin grinding wheel or perhaps using a dremel style tool. A true brad point bit looks like this...

    brad point drill tip.jpg brad point drill tip2.jpgbrad point drill tip3.jpg

    Many people (including manufacturers) refer to a pointed drill bit with the cutting edge angles "inverted" like this...

    brad point drill tip4.jpg

    as a brad point drill bit. This does have a point (depending on the drill purchased) it may or may not be a "brad" point. The brad point being a fine point. This inverted grind is easy enough to do on a grinder, but will not provide the same performance as a true brad point drill bit with "spurs". I don't think the spurs will help a great deal when drilling into end grain, they do however help when drilling across the grain, providing a nice clean edge around the hole, This clean edge can be very useful if you need to drill through melamine or laminate.

    The "pretend" brad point drills are a cross between a twist drill and a spade bit.

    I purchased a "pretend" brad point drill bit to drill 5mm holes for adjustable shelving. The result was a ragged edge around the hole, not as clean as the result from the Blum 7 spindle drilling head. I purchased a "dowel" drill which is a true brad point drill bit (but only a short drill bit) and the result was a clean edge around the hole.

    Anyway, I think the spurs will help keep the drill bit straight when drilling into end grain, but if I was doing the drilling I'd purchase an auger bit. An auger bit usually has the spur.

    Good luck
    Kind Regards

    Peter

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    29
    Posts
    4,980

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrFixIt View Post
    This inverted grind is easy enough to do on a grinder, but will not provide the same performance as a true brad point drill bit with "spurs".
    Sorry Peter, but I thoroughly disagree. You might recall the same discussion last year about "fake" brad points where I showed a perfectly clean hole with one of my self-made inverted grind bits Brad Point Drill Bits - Two Types?

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    GOSFORD NSW
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Thank you Peter.
    An auger looked great but I was concerned that it would have a tendency to 'keep going'
    and would be difficult to stop. I suppose I could fix a strong stop plate on the bottom of
    my jig. I tried a speed bore spade bit with a screw tip and while it was great for drilling 'through'
    I really had trouble pulling it up. Do you think the auger you are suggesting might offer the
    same resistance ?

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. center hole drilling jig
    By hillpanther in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 5th Jun 2012, 09:03 PM
  2. Drilling End Grain
    By moh man in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 25th Dec 2011, 11:11 AM
  3. core hole drilling
    By AV Elec in forum HAND TOOLS - POWERED
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16th Feb 2009, 06:29 PM
  4. OF 1400 & Hole drilling set
    By Dustie in forum FESTOOL FORUM
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26th Feb 2008, 03:21 PM
  5. Drilling large hole over small hole or vice-versa
    By niki in forum HOMEMADE TOOLS AND JIGS ETC.
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 2nd Nov 2007, 08:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •