Thanks Thanks:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    melbourne, laverton
    Posts
    1,469

    Default Remington 700. 223

    hi every one i had a shot of a mates. Remington 700. 223. the bolt action seemed way to tight. its practically new and i couldn't see an obvious thing wrong with it.
    any ideas

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,938

    Default

    What part of the action felt tight - closing/opening or feeding/extracting or both?
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,645

    Default

    What is your definition of tight what are you comparing it with

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sydney,Australia
    Posts
    3,156

    Default

    If its 'tight' closing the bolt, then ask - are the rounds reloads? Have they been used in a different rifle? Have they been full length resized? Are the projectiles seated too far out? If it is happening with 'factory' rounds it is also possible that there has been an 'error' in the original chambering and the chamber has not been correctly finished (Yes it happens, including rifles shipped with a 'test group' that did not have any chamber cut at all)

    If it is tight on opening, then check - has the primer been extruded into the firing pin hole using reloaded ammo - too much pressure, consider changing friends before the funeral. Are there small shiny scratches on the case - possible rust in the chamber due to improper storage, either before or after your friend bought the rifle. If the corrosion gets bad you will need a cleaning rod to force the case out of the chamber (DAMHIK, bldy Crookwell).

    If it is tight with no cartridge, check the bolt for scratches/wear marks. Someone may have over tightened the bedding screws holding the action to the stock or used screws that are too long (or left packing washers out), either for the bedding screws or to fasten a scope mount. You can also have problems if the safety is not locking properly in the 'off' position, causing the interlocking piece to drag, or some of the other screws or pins are out of place/over tightened. There could even be a bit of foam packing stuck in some odd cranny of the action that is just dragging.

    Just a few ideas to tide you over

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Lismore NSW
    Posts
    4

    Default .223 Problems

    I have a new Howa 223 heavy barrel s/s and have had no end of problems with tight bolt and bad grouping, have tried everything and had other people check my reloads for every concievable thing to no avail. The club cronogragh showed wildly different projectile speeds eg 3200,3150,3780 3556 ect ect. Last week the problem was solved, when bought the gun shop gave me bags of new brass to do my reloads and it would seem that i was given 5.56 brass NOT .223 brass. They are NOT THE SAME THING no matter what any magazine or salesman says. You live and learn.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    melbourne, laverton
    Posts
    1,469

    Default thanks for replying

    thanks for the help. the rifle isnt here at the moment. so ill be able to give more details in a week or so.
    its a brand new rifle less than 100 rounds. and they were new rounds of very good quality.
    ok thanks again more details soon.
    aaron

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lebrina
    Posts
    1,099

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TAFE student View Post
    Last week the problem was solved, when bought the gun shop gave me bags of new brass to do my reloads and it would seem that i was given 5.56 brass NOT .223 brass. They are NOT THE SAME THING no matter what any magazine or salesman says. You live and learn.
    Please explain.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,938

    Default

    It is my understanding that the 5.56 and the 223 cartridge are the same specs, however the difference is in the chamber. The SAAMI 223 chamber is basically a slightly tighter version of the NATO 5.56. The reason for this (the "slack" NATO chamber) is to reduce the likelihood of jams/misfeeds in military weapons which are more likely to encounter harsh and dirty environments.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,938

    Default

    BTW, for me it's standard practice to use a full length die on any new (or second hand) brass. That way you can be sure you are starting from a known position.

    I will normally only neck die the brass after it has been fired for the first time (i.e. fire formed), and continue to do so as long as it still feeds smoothly ... but I only use those reloads in the one rifle.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lebrina
    Posts
    1,099

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vernonv View Post
    It is my understanding that the 5.56 and the 223 cartridge are the same specs, however the difference is in the chamber. The SAAMI 223 chamber is basically a slightly tighter version of the NATO 5.56. The reason for this is to reduce the likelihood of jams/misfeeds in military weapons which are more likely to encounter harsh and dirty environments.
    That was also my understanding. Given the wide range of velocities recorded by TAFE student, I wonder if he has fallen into the trap of assuming that all different sources of cases in a given caliber will have the same internal volume and has inadvertently overloaded some rounds. 3700 fps is some serious velocity for a .223 to achieve. I seem to remember that 5.56 and 7.62 military brass has a heavier web than commercial brass in those calibers, thus decreasing internal volume and effectively increasing the load.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
    Age
    49
    Posts
    1,938

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Robbers View Post
    I seem to remember that 5.56 and 7.62 military brass has a heavier web than commercial brass in those calibers...
    I have heard the same.

    I buy my 223 brass secondhand/once fired and I'm led to believe it's military brass (it's manufactured by ADI). I've never really taken any notice of the webbing thickness or volumes, and just develop a load for the best grouping (use it for hunting). As I mentioned above I always full length resize them first and have never had any issues.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Bendigo Victoria
    Age
    76
    Posts
    16,561

    Default

    Some history and a comparison here.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lebrina
    Posts
    1,099

    Default

    So in actual fact, the cartridges are the same, but the leade or freebore of their respective chambers differs. That and the difference in their maximum pressure specs.
    If reloading their should be no difference other than that produced by cartridge volume variations.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sydney,Australia
    Posts
    3,156

    Default

    Military brass usually has different hardness characteristics to make it suitable for use in full auto weapons, but I can't remember if its harder or softer than civilian brass without digging through a few reference books.

    On a 'historical' note, according to several retired US military personnel the US DoD did not originally have written specifications for either the chamber or the case for the 5.56 round, it was 'assumed' that the right people knew and that their companies would get the contract to supply the rifles and ammunition - of course that did not happen, so Hercules loaded the rounds with their powder rather than Winchester, the cases were just sized off a sample case not written specs, sub-contractors for rifle components just guessed at the chamber dimensions based off, again, sample cases. It is now a subject of amazement that the M16 actually managed to function at all, and its only taken, what, 40 odd years for it to become a reasonably effective system.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    153

    Default

    My advice to anyone who has new brass to reload, (brass by a manufacturer they havent used before) is to take a fired and sized case from their old batch of brass and a sized case from the new batch, put a primer in both, fill with the powder you use, empty it into the scales pan and weigh. Make absolutely sure you use the same shake down or tap to get the powder level because powder does compress and might skew the result.
    You can do it with water but that is not easy to translate into actual powder volumes/weights. There may be just a miniscule difference or you may get a surprise.
    Ive used ADI 7.62 cases and civvie .308win cases and found some fairly big differences in volume. The ADIs held less. Not that it had much practical importance in a 308/7.62 case but as the cases get smaller, differences in volume and hence powder weight become more and more critical.
    1 or 2 extra grains in my .35 Whelen make 4/5s of bugger all difference to pressures.
    1-2 grains in my .222R Martini Cadet is the difference between shooting all day and having hot gases escape through the firing pin hole and having to dismantle the rifle to get the case out. Something I learnt 24 years ago and havnt forgotton.
    If you combine a smaller volume case, a short 'lead', long seated bullet with a hot load of fast powder things can get very exciting.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. test remington rifle stock
    By greghud in forum WOODWORK - GENERAL
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 13th Aug 2011, 12:06 AM
  2. The Remington Gouge
    By Phil Spencer in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 7th Aug 2009, 01:39 PM
  3. Remington
    By Les in Red Deer in forum WOODTURNING - PEN TURNING
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19th Jun 2009, 05:51 PM
  4. A Pair Of Remington 7mm
    By Les in Red Deer in forum WOODTURNING - PEN TURNING
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 8th Jun 2009, 08:50 PM
  5. Remington 1863
    By classic arms in forum WOODCARVING AND SCULPTURE
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10th Nov 2006, 08:53 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •