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Thread: Rifleing

  1. #16
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    have a look on youtube there are a lot of people on the showing you how cut rifleing

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  3. #17
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    There is endless disscussion about which method results in a more accurate and or longer lasting bore.
    I noticed a while back that the benchrest community have been paying a premium for stress relieved cut rifled barrels. This was the technique supposedly put out to pasture by button and hammer forged barrels. Hammer forging is often touted by makers as the new 'bee's knees' of barrel making but it was one of the first techniques developed wayyyyy back when.
    "Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem"

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridfiat View Post
    There is endless disscussion about which method results in a more accurate and or longer lasting bore.
    I noticed a while back that the benchrest community have been paying a premium for stress relieved cut rifled barrels. This was the technique supposedly put out to pasture by button and hammer forged barrels. Hammer forging is often touted by makers as the new 'bee's knees' of barrel making but it was one of the first techniques developed wayyyyy back when.
    Interesting comments. I have looked into rifling methods but only for interest sake. One thing I do wonder about tho is how modern metalurgy and methods could have changed the results over the years. Could be hard to compare the old and new. The only way to tell is to compare the different methods with modern rifles.

    Dean

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldneweng View Post
    Interesting comments. I have looked into rifling methods but only for interest sake. One thing I do wonder about tho is how modern metalurgy and methods could have changed the results over the years. Could be hard to compare the old and new. The only way to tell is to compare the different methods with modern rifles.

    Dean
    Yes I was intrigued by it. The barrels are newly made cut rifled not old. New metallurgy has changed but the method was justified by the theory that if you make a rod, drill it, stress relieve it and then cut only very fine grooves inside the stresses set up are minimal and unlikely to affect accuracy. 'Stability' being everything here. There are I concede many 'hummer' cut rifle barrels out there.
    The theory goes on, button and hammerforged barrels by the very nature of their manufacture are stressed metal waiting to "spring back". So if they are not completely stress relieved the barrel has 'inherent' instability.
    Now that's not me that's saying this, I dont get that pedantic with my rifles as they are for hunting. Shooting over the top of a ute late at night with the engine running is light years from a benchrest table. But I thought Id throw it in for good measure.
    The target 'community' is full of people with theories and strong opinions on what works best.
    Ive read that many gunsmith shops in the US had "No Target Shooters" signs on the door to discourage them. Having made ergonomic pistol grips and some stocks for target shooters in the past I understand why.
    "Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem"

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridfiat View Post
    Yes I was intrigued by it. The barrels are newly made cut rifled not old. New metallurgy has changed but the method was justified by the theory that if you make a rod, drill it, stress relieve it and then cut only very fine grooves inside the stresses set up are minimal and unlikely to affect accuracy. 'Stability' being everything here. There are I concede many 'hummer' cut rifle barrels out there.
    The theory goes on, button and hammerforged barrels by the very nature of their manufacture are stressed metal waiting to "spring back". So if they are not completely stress relieved the barrel has 'inherent' instability.
    Now that's not me that's saying this, I dont get that pedantic with my rifles as they are for hunting. Shooting over the top of a ute late at night with the engine running is light years from a benchrest table. But I thought Id throw it in for good measure.
    The target 'community' is full of people with theories and strong opinions on what works best.
    Ive read that many gunsmith shops in the US had "No Target Shooters" signs on the door to discourage them. Having made ergonomic pistol grips and some stocks for target shooters in the past I understand why.
    I am in the same position as you. Tried to get a half grown fox in front paddock Saturday but was gone by the time I got the gun out there. He was playing around for a couple of hours every morning last week except Friday according to SWMBO. I have a medical condition that reduces lung capacity so if I rush I am unlikely to be able to hit the ground from being out of breath. Because of this I am unlikely to take up target shooting.

    Dean

  7. #21
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    Plus why make an already difficult sport infinitely more difficult by only declaring your day a success if you put 5 rounds through the same hole on a piece of paper.

    Full credit to the bench rest guys though...takes lots of skill and patience to do it well.

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