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  1. #16
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    Ummm. I thought I could see medullary rays on the previous pix Matt posted.However:

    Tasmanian Tiger Myrtle (Yeah, I know, it is a toothless tiger .)

    P1040366 (Medium).JPG

    and Sliky Oak. Don't know if it is from the North, South, East or West. Might even be from middle earth as it has growth rings.

    P1040361 (Medium).JPG

    I stand corrected , but am keeling rapidly over under a small degree of intoxication (SWMBO made me a Mohito. I did ask if this was a clever ploy to take unfair advantage of my diminished resistence to feminine charms. She said "No." I considered it would have been diplomatic to say this after some soul searching, but it was instantaneous. I thought that perhaps Tom Cruise was calling by or even George Clooney, but it turns out I am playing second fiddle to the ironing!)

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    Iím about on page one of a wood identification bible of any sort.
    I am about here:

    identifying wood.jpg
    Theory and practice are the same in theory, but different in practice.

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    ......But ,if anyone has some Myrtle Beech suitable for saw handles I may be interested.
    Itís the first time Iíve used period.
    It cuts easily and shapes well....
    Matt, I think it's an excellent handle wood for those reasons and because it's also moderately dense, takes a good finish, & seems to be tough & durable. In fact, I reckon it has very similar properties to Apple wood, which Mr. Disston seemed to think was the choice of handle woods for saws.

    It does, however, have a drawback (lunch is never free!), and that is it's a beast to sand to the sort of finish I like to get. It doesn't scrape as well as harder woods like She-oak, so I have to resort to a good deal of sanding, starting with coarser grits than I would on an easier-to-finish wood. You need to work carefully through every grit size, don't try shortcuts like skipping a grade, & don't move on to a finer grit until you are satisfied every last scratch from the grade before is gone. I'm probably obsessive, so you finish as you see fit, but I suspect a bloke from your background would spot a scratch from 6 feet away & not be happy about it...

    Cheers,
    IW

  5. #19
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    Thanks Ian for the tip.
    Sanding, is kind of fun ,I think isnít it [emoji849]

    Cheers Matt,

  6. #20
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    Default Iím no longer making saws.

    Iím having issues please help [emoji849].
    Iím not 100 percent happy with this area on the saw handle.


    I would like to incorporate something similar to what Ian as done on his saw(Its called a lambs tongue for those unsure)
    An what many have done in the past.
    Like so
    But I just canít seem to get my head around it.
    So any suggestions good, bad or down right disgusting will be taken on board.

    Cheers Matt(feeling a little whimpish)

    Actually just re checking my checking lol
    I quite Paulís lamb tongue as well.

  7. #21
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    Matt

    I think I know what aspect you are struggling with.

    Namely, how to blend in the lambs tongue. My recommendation is to form the curve of the cheek first: Then when that is to your liking, form the lambs tongue. Because you have left a fair amount of material where the tongue moves back on the handle at the "Vee" you will be able to exaggerate the hump and it will appear more curved. Ian could have done that on his saw that you pictured but obviously chose not to do that. It just depends what end result you desire. I like a little more flamboyance to my handles than Ian who prefers more practicality.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Matt

    I think I know what aspect you are struggling with.

    Namely, how to blend in the lambs tongue. My recommendation is to form the curve of the cheek first: Then when that is to your liking, form the lambs tongue. Because you have left a fair amount of material where the tongue moves back on the handle at the "Vee" you will be able to exaggerate the hump and it will appear more curved. Ian could have done that on his saw that you pictured but obviously chose not to do that. It just depends what end result you desire. I like a little more flamboyance to my handles than Ian who prefers more practicality.

    Regards
    Paul
    Paul,
    No not really, but maybe [emoji849][emoji849][emoji849][emoji849]after I posted.
    A faint light bulb went off just light enough for me to go drrrrree,
    What Iíve been struggling with is the ďcourageĒ to put words into actions, and then not completely stuff it up, and destroy all my other work.
    For which I would then have to cry and drink.
    Which would not be right.
    So being a complete whimp, why donít I just reproduce just the area I want to play around with on some scrap first.
    Then when I get that right just copy it [emoji849][emoji849][emoji849][emoji849].
    I also like to be just a little bit flamboyant too, well just a tad nothing OTT of course that would be silly.
    But you canít argue with Ianís ability either.
    I have one of his creations hanging on my tool wall and greatly admire it.

    Cheers Matt.

  9. #23
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    just to emphasize that there's more'n one way to de-skin the moggy, cutting the lamb's tongue is what I do first after cleaning up the profile to my template lines. This bit, and letting-in the spine are the two most fraught operations for me, so if it goes pear-shaped, I won't have lost so much.

    I'm almost reluctant to tell you how I cut the LT, it's childishly simple! I have a large carving gouge, can't tell you what # sweep it is, but it has just the right curvature for the job. I just place it in the right spot & give it a few sharp whacks, then move it down a bit & angle the sweep so it will chop out a chip with a coupe more whacks. On really hard woods like She-oak, I usually have to have several goes, keeping the top side vertical, and gradually increasing the size of the 'V' groove. Occasionally, I split a great chunk out, particularly on wild-grained woods, but if all goes well, I get a very clean, sharply-defined groove of a pleasing shape. This is then blended into the bottom connector-piece of the handle during subsequent shaping. My couple of Liogier modellers' rasps do a fine job here...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    ...... I like a little more flamboyance to my handles than Ian who prefers more practicality.......
    'Subtlety', Paul, 'subtle', is my goal.

    Practicality is a given, I think - a saw handle has to be comfortable & suited to purpose, for sure, & that's always my primary concern. Before adding decorative flourishes, make sure the important bits are right, i.e. the grip is comfy & at the right angle for the intended function of your saw. What you do to the non-essential parts is up to your imagination.
    I think it's very easy to get too flamboyant. In my view, it's hard to beat the basic shape of the 19th century grips, so I don't stray far from those, so to put a bit of individuality into my handles, I play with the lines around the cheeks. I make these a bit sharper, and blend them into the more curvaceous parts of the grip, to add visual interest. But beauty is all in the eye of the looker.....

    Cheers,
    IW

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    just to emphasize that there's more'n one way to de-skin the moggy, cutting the lamb's tongue is what I do first after cleaning up the profile to my template lines. This bit, and letting-in the spine are the two most fraught operations for me, so if it goes pear-shaped, I won't have lost so much.

    I'm almost reluctant to tell you how I cut the LT, it's childishly simple! I have a large carving gouge, can't tell you what # sweep it is, but it has just the right curvature for the job. I just place it in the right spot & give it a few sharp whacks, then move it down a bit & angle the sweep so it will chop out a chip with a coupe more whacks. On really hard woods like She-oak, I usually have to have several goes, keeping the top side vertical, and gradually increasing the size of the 'V' groove. Occasionally, I split a great chunk out, particularly on wild-grained woods, but if all goes well, I get a very clean, sharply-defined groove of a pleasing shape. This is then blended into the bottom connector-piece of the handle during subsequent shaping. My couple of Liogier modellers' rasps do a fine job here...



    'Subtlety', Paul, 'subtle', is my goal.

    Practicality is a given, I think - a saw handle has to be comfortable & suited to purpose, for sure, & that's always my primary concern. Before adding decorative flourishes, make sure the important bits are right, i.e. the grip is comfy & at the right angle for the intended function of your saw. What you do to the non-essential parts is up to your imagination.
    I think it's very easy to get too flamboyant. In my view, it's hard to beat the basic shape of the 19th century grips, so I don't stray far from those, so to put a bit of individuality into my handles, I play with the lines around the cheeks. I make these a bit sharper, and blend them into the more curvaceous parts of the grip, to add visual interest. But beauty is all in the eye of the looker.....

    Cheers,
    Ian.
    I completely agree with your statement above regarding letting in the spine and also cutting the saw slot.
    I my self general do these first,because like you have pointed out in the past.
    If there wrong(letís call them the foundation)
    Thereís no use building the rest.
    It wonít work!

    Also, when you said the carving gouge, I thought Iíve heard that before,and that is beautiful simple just use what you have,
    My problem is partly the way Iíve formed the check tho.



    Now, if I have to banded for a week for showing such a disgusting picture so be it.
    But, I use one these quite often some weeks.
    There quite comfortable(if I close my eyes and pretend)they also cut wood.
    They are not subtle in anyway, no decorative flourishings at all.
    Were would we be Ian if we all except these[emoji35].

    This is were we would be .

    Cheers Matt.

  11. #25
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    No need to feel ashamed for owning a hard-point or two, I have a couple. Great for pruning trees and the one in my ute is especially handy when I chance on a discarded pile of re-useable wood that's too long for the tray...

    BUT

    I certainly don't use it for doing something like this: Sawcut b.jpg

    The cut-out is to let-in a piece of 1mm thick brass, so the deep edge of the cut line is 1mm from the edge. The kerf is a titch over 0.5mm wide, making the off-cut sliver a bit less than 0.5mm.

    This is a disgusting bit of showing-off, but it is an example of what a 'good' saw can do. Just a few years ago I could not have sharpened a saw well enough to make as clean a cut and follow a line so close to an edge...

    Cheers,
    IW

  12. #26
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    Hmm, sorry Matt, I was too busy skiting & forgot the real reason for replying.

    OK, I see your dilemma, I had assumed you would do the lamb's tongue under the first curve, bringing it out behind the second. Are you really going to stop it, or is that just your unsteady drawing? You do like to set yourself challenges,don't you!?

    However, there is no reason why you can't give your lamb a re-curved tongue (though you'd better run it by the animal ethics committee before proceeding ). Just find two gouges with curves that approximate to your desired sculpting cuts. In fact, I think you could do both cuts with the same gouge, so you only need to find one. In-cannel or out-cannel doesn't make much difference in this situation, but it does need to be sharp, & out-cannels are easier to sharpen.

    If you don't own any gouges, here's a good excuse to do a bit of rust-hunting, they are handy tools for all sorts of situations, so it doesn't hurt to have a small selection in your tool kit....

    Chers,
    IW

  13. #27
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    Well I finished work early today, and we skated up to the steel palace for the weekend.
    So I was able to quickly get this done.
    First I cut a ruff template of the offensive area, then I very quickly hacked into it like a mad man, resulting in not much of an impression of a lambs tongue[emoji849].
    But I think itís shows the potential


    This was followed by a cider because Sal said I had too.
    So before I cut up very nice piece of Mrylte Beech.
    Thoughts please???
    Last I shaded in the area that will potential end up on my creative zones floor possibly tomorrow.

  14. #28
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    Matt, it's probably too late & you've already taken to your handle with gusto & rasp, but the more I look at it, the more I think you should stop where you are at in the pics above. Your double- curved underline looks rather good as-is, & I think removing the material you've shaded is NOT going to improve the looks of at at all. At the most, a vee groove that follows the two incurves might spruce it up a bit more, but honestly, I think this is a case of more being less. The wood itself is going to look pretty spiffy polished up, so myb try for a bit of subtlety on this one......

    Cheers,
    IW

  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Matt, it's probably too late & you've already taken to your handle with gusto & rasp, but the more I look at it, the more I think you should stop where you are at in the pics above. Your double- curved underline looks rather good as-is, & I think removing the material you've shaded is NOT going to improve the looks of at at all. At the most, a vee groove that follows the two incurves might spruce it up a bit more, but honestly, I think this is a case of more being less. The wood itself is going to look pretty spiffy polished up, so myb try for a bit of subtlety on this one......

    Cheers,
    Ian,
    At present the handle is as you see it.
    Iím 50/50 as to weather I carve the tongue in or not.
    Maybe there lies the answer and your possible right less can be more.
    The timber as you point out is hopefully going to pop once I get it all sanded up.
    So since Iíve reluctantly wanted to do the handle.
    Todayís effort 2 saw bolt sets
    Still a little bit of work on them to go

    Plus working out excalty were to seat them

    Iíve also been working out a little this evening lol


    Thatís at 180 dry so far [emoji849][emoji849][emoji849][emoji849]

    Cheers Matt,

    Also Ian that was very very impressive cut line you showed before.
    I wasnít sure what I was looking at till I read your explanation [emoji106][emoji106].

  16. #30
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    A tiny little bit of progress this late afternoon,but it feels like a big step forward,after the creative zone cooled down from plus 45.
    After sanding the handle to 600 dry then a hand buff with some EEE polish,then finally a wash down with acetone.
    A few coats of clear acrylic were sprayed on.
    Very very happy with finish so far I will let that dry off for a few days.
    Then rub out any orange peel and polish it up.

    Note point Iím very inpatient some times I just wanted to get the finish on to see the grain pop I still have the saw nut and bolt holes to go[emoji849].

    So glad I didnít choose photography as a career Iíd be living under a bridge by now [emoji23].

    Cheers Matt.

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