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  1. #1
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    Default Taper Grinding Saw Blades

    Glorious Fall weather has coincided with some free time. I haven't really touched saw making for more than a year but today I had an opportunity to make some taper ground backsaw blades that I've been meaning to get to for a long time now .

    It occurred to me that although I've described the process I use I've never posted pictures so here goes.

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    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

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  3. #2
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    Default

    Nicely done. Are you grinding both sides or just one?

  4. #3
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    Yes, you must grind both sides as evenly as possible. Due to the stresses inherent in this type of stock if the grind lacks bilateral uniformity you get a curved toothline that can't be fixed by adjusting the back.
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  5. #4
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    Rob,
    Do you think taper grinding could be done by placing the plate down on a piece of say MDF held down with double sided tape the saw plate.
    Using a belt sander.
    Than flip it and do the other side.

    Cheers Matt

  6. #5
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    Matt,

    Yes, it is possible to taper grind with a handheld belt sander. Trick is to find belts that will tolerate grinding hardened steel. Aluminum oxide belts will do the job but you'll wear out several doing a single blade. This was the first way I tried, I'm on version #4.5 in my techniques - building a new machine now.

    Cheers,
    Rob
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob streeper View Post
    Matt,

    Yes, it is possible to taper grind with a handheld belt sander. Trick is to find belts that will tolerate grinding hardened steel. Aluminum oxide belts will do the job but you'll wear out several doing a single blade. This was the first way I tried, I'm on version #4.5 in my techniques - building a new machine now.

    Cheers,
    Rob
    How did this turn out mate?

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemick01 View Post
    How did this turn out mate?

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    On hold at the moment. I've got more irons in the fire than I can shake a stick at, the tool stuff takes at best second place to the real priorities. I think I may be able to work on this some time in the next week or so.
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob streeper View Post
    On hold at the moment. I've got more irons in the fire than I can shake a stick at, the tool stuff takes at best second place to the real priorities. I think I may be able to work on this some time in the next week or so.
    Sweet. You do some awesome work here mate. Keep it up.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  10. #9
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    Default Correction to the record

    I've been reading a good deal on steel and industrial technology generally lately and have come across a couple of books that are quite good. The first is Metallurgy for Non-metallurgists published ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals). I found this copy of the 2015 printing at a good price recently.

    Metallurgy cover shot.JPG


    I highly recommend the book, excellent writing and technical content.

    Interestingly I found this at the end of the first chapter contained in a list of technological achievements in metallurgy of the early 20th century.
    Disston use of inductive furnace cropped.JPG
    which provides important additional detail (inductive melting) to the information presented on the Disstonian Institute site at Online Reference of Disston Saws -- No.7 and D7 Models

    excerpt from Disstonian on steelmaking.JPG

    which has been misinterpreted in online discussions as being electric arc melting.

    The next book of interest on the subject is this one.

    Steel city cover.JPG

    Tweedale emphasizes throughout the text that the steelmakers of Sheffield suffered greatly because of their resistance to change at level of both management and employee. Electric arc furnaces, developed in France, were only introduced in Sheffield in 1910, four years after it was introduced in America. Thus, even at the time of the birth of metallurgy Sheffield was losing it's primacy in steel.
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob streeper View Post
    I've been reading a good deal on steel and industrial technology generally lately and have come across a couple of books that are quite good.
    The next book of interest on the subject is this one.

    Steel city cover.JPG

    Tweedale emphasizes throughout the text that the steelmakers of Sheffield suffered greatly because of their resistance to change at level of both management and employee. Electric arc furnaces, developed in France, were only introduced in Sheffield in 1910, four years after it was introduced in America. Thus, even at the time of the birth of metallurgy Sheffield was losing it's primacy in steel.
    interesting observation.

    William Slim, in his book Defeat into Victory (which primarily deals with the WWII campaign against the Japanese in Burma) relates an anecdote from just before WWI when he was a very junior "white collar" (= lower middle class) worker in a Sheffield steel mill. Slim speaks of the fear in the eyes of one highly experienced [lower class] worker, whose job entailed heating the end of a bar or tube to a precise temperature -- determined by the colour of the bar -- prior to the bar being "bulged" in a press. The worker's fear came from the likely consequences should his skill in determining the best forging temperature for the bulge be replaced by a more precise temperature gauge.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  12. #11
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    Default Saw Blade Taper Grinding Machine v. 3.5

    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  13. #12
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    Have a video but it's .mov, how do I upload it?
    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  14. #13
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    Innovations are those useful things that, by dint of chance, manage to survive the stupidity and destructive tendencies inherent in human nature.

  15. #14
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    Rob

    That is such a good idea. I am assuming that the belts are just slightly larger than the uninflated tyre and it "tensions" up when inflated.

    Regards
    Paul

    Ps: Can't help with the vid issue. That is another thing at which I am no good . But I am interested to know how .
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  16. #15
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    Rob

    Looking at the wheels (and the hub) and noting it is sitting on a bench or stand. I realise the wheels are from a small vehicle such as a ride on lawn mower or similar. What size motor is driving the sander? I appreciate it is geared down with the pulleys.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

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