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  1. #16
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    Default Upper Guides.

    And while we're on the subject of guides. It looks like you've got most of the upper guides.

    Guides upper.jpg

    But it looks to me like there should be some additional material between the two metal guides.

    Guide upper.png

    Maybe shaped timber inserts? It would be interesting to see those metal guides in more detail.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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  3. #17
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    May 2016
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    Perth
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    Thanks to everyone who has contributed!

    Rob those pamphlets are great and I've pored over it to see what it might have looked like new.

    More photos on the top guides below.

    20220906_214401.jpg20220906_213202.jpg20220906_213019.jpg20220906_213058.jpg20220906_214221.jpg

    I took the two metal guides off to see if there was any indication of an additional material, however it became apparent that they are all of a single piece of brass or bronze.

    They have both worn quite a bit, which seems to be from wear from rubbing on the side of the blade. They have also worn unevenly, maybe from previous owners favouring right hand cuts, or biased blades?

    The metal guides have a little rebate which sits on a corresponding ledge on the guide, however when seated properly, they splay away from the blade quite a lot. No big deal as they can be positioned to be parallel quite easily and held in place with the screws.

    The good news is I don't think these need replacing, however I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on the utility of filing the worn edges straight, or just keep them slightly convex.

    You can also see that the grey paint is not original as it has been painted over threads, bolt heads etc. That's some on the guide in the 3rd picture, which I'm sure wasn't done at the factory. I'm not thinking about a repaint of the whole machine at this stage, just cleaning it up, replacing / fixing whatever needs it to optimise performance. That said, the darker grey / gunmetal colour that shows underneath in patches looks a lot better than its current colour.

    Thanks, Zac.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #18
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    Sth Gippsland Vic
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    By the looks of the guides they need fixing up . Just filing or grinding straight doesn't look good enough . They look to have run out of travel. Or are close to running out. I once fitted brass guides to one of my band saws and they didn't last long before losing the required shape . Bronze is harder and probably longer lasting in a guide like that. I was just reading about it here . Bronze vs Brass, What is the difference? Which is better?

    Robinson would have cast and machined the ones on your saw. Unless they are later replacements done by someone with the skills . I just looked at George white and they don't sell solid Bronze flat that you could machine some from . Non Ferrous Metals Suppliers | George White Co & Pty Ltd

    At least you have them to copy from or repair. You could Braze Bronze rod and fill the missing worn parts in. Or Braze on solid Bronze . A bit of a process. Or You could make or have new ones made.
    Chris Vesper does work on band saws . I think I read he was doing guides for someone . Vesper Tools – Superb Quality Woodworking Tools – Since 1998

    If it were my problem id be replacing the just worn parts with the same or better.

    I did my own guides on My Wadkin DR 30 . Ive only done one pair. It takes a pretty basic type of guide. The saw would take more above and under the table . They work perfectly so I haven't done any more yet.
    The originals were wood. Wood means replacing every year or two I think .
    I cut and machined some steel and brazed Tungsten pads to that to sit each side of the blade for the blade to skid on if it deflects up against them.

    IMG_6710.JPG IMG_6759.JPG IMG_6763.JPG IMG_6762.JPG IMG_6857.jpg

    I use a 1.25" deep blade on that saw. I only rip stuff down to size on it . Ive got two other smaller Band saws, one running a 3/8" blade and another running a 1/4" blade. If I was swapping blades on the 30" saw to smaller ones I may need smaller guides for that ? With a set under the table as well .

    Your lucky if you get a classic machine in its original paint. What you have isn't to bad compared to what was originally on it. Id be wire brushing and buffing some of the steel knobs and threads that shouldn't be painted and getting the running parts around the guides and bearings oiled and running nice first. Re paint is a lot of work .
    My Wadkin DR was just re buffed bare steel parts and a coat of clear over the paint . With a finishing touch of Red paint on the Wadkin name on the bottom door.

  5. #19
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by auscab View Post
    By the looks of the guides they need fixing up . Just filing or grinding straight doesn't look good enough . They look to have run out of travel. Or are close to running out...
    I have to agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by auscab
    ...At least you have them to copy from or repair. You could Braze Bronze rod and fill the missing worn parts in. Or Braze on solid Bronze . A bit of a process. Or You could make or have new ones made...
    I did wonder about building up with braze then filing to shape - but I wasn't sure if brass/bronze would be suitable. Maybe build up with welding rod?

    Being a traditionalist I do like the idea of sticking with hardwood guides below the table - at least until you get sick of replacing them regularly.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  6. #20
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    May 2016
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    Perth
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    Bit more attention given to the top guides today.

    First thing was to take it all apart and give everything a good clean. Everything has seized and the guide could not be moved in or out, nor up or down.

    The rear thrust bearing had also seized.

    Pictured below is with everything cleaned and oiled with a new bearing in place.


    The column at the back was also cleaned and the strap connecting to the spring was also reattached. The guide can now be moved up and down the full depth of travel with relative ease. The spring makes it quite easy to move the guide up, despite the weight of all that cast iron. There's just over 390mm of cutting height under the guide at full height.

    20220911_205610.jpg20220911_210048.jpg20220911_210120.jpg20220911_205841.jpg20220911_205720.jpg20220911_143730.jpg

    Next stop is the bottom guides. I took them off to have a look. They are approx 25mm thick and made of an unknown hardwood, although one that is not particularly dense. They'd been painted grey, in situ. Im convinced the metal guide is supposed to slide in and out, but is currently seized in place. I'll have a closer look at this next, as well as make some new guide blocks in the correct shape from a suitably hard-wearing WA hardwood. I'm thinking of using Wandoo at this stage.

    The time is approaching to order a new blade. I take it I can't go wrong ordering from Henry Bros. Would a bimetal 1/2 inch 3tpi be considered a good allrounder?

    Thanks, Zac.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #21
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    Dec 2007
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    Sydney
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    Default

    That sounds ok.
    I used similar blades on a 36” Wadkin DR in the model shop at the Uni.
    I used to weld them up next door in the toolroom using the welder on the metal bandsaw from a roll of Starrett blade stock.
    H.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

  8. #22
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    May 2016
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    Perth
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    I was able to remove the lower guide last night. Once the paint was removed from the rear portion of the shaft, it slid out of its housing nicely. There is a dowel in there that doesn't look original, so I'll need to investigate that a bit more. Making new lower guides from a suitable hardwood doesn't look like too much of a of a challenge.

    20220912_215211.jpg

    While I was at it, the blade clearance insert had seen better days, so that came out as well. I'm thinking of a fitting hardwood replacement, but am also tempted by the shiny brass one that Rob posted on his DR.

    20220912_215257.jpg20220912_215506.jpg

    The table is 19mm thick cast iron at it's thinnest point in between the ribs. Makes for a hefty table.

    20220912_220029.jpg

    Thanks, Zac.

  9. #23
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    May 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fergiz01 View Post
    While I was at it, the blade clearance insert had seen better days, so that came out as well. I'm thinking of a fitting hardwood replacement, but am also tempted by the shiny brass one that Rob posted on his DR.

    My Brass one is brass sheet glued onto plywood . I think its 3 or 4mm ?

  10. #24
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fergiz01 View Post
    ...While I was at it, the blade clearance insert had seen better days, so that came out as well. I'm thinking of a fitting hardwood replacement...
    I made a wooden replacement for mine. I put a bevel on one side but obviously didn't get it right because I cannot tilt the table anywhere near 45 degrees.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  11. #25
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    May 2016
    Location
    Perth
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    Default

    It's been while since the last update, but I plead that I had to rearrange much of my shed to fit the new bandsaw in.

    I managed to get the lower guide assembly out and clean everything up. The layer of paint on the guide shaft prevented it from being adjusted in or out, however this is now gone and all the parts have been cleaned and now adjust smoothly.

    I made new Jarrah lower guides and a new table insert from Jarrah, however this will need to be redone when the new resaw blade arrives from McDivens (taking my time to ensure a better fit). As it is they both work fine. I fitted the new blade it came with (pictured), adjusted everything and peeled off some 5mm slices from a 200mm Karri board. Very happy with how everything works. Very much looking forward to fitting the new 27mm resaw blade when it arrives.

    20221006_140314.jpg20221006_140137.jpg

    More to come. Thanks, Zac.

  12. #26
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    Sunshine Coast, QLD
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    Default

    Looks good

  13. #27
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    Aug 2003
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    Default

    Wow nice machine!
    That's a lifetime machine for sure.

    I can't help wonder if the number 770 is indicative of it's size or factory model number. I find it had to believe that is a serial number, foundries didn't usually get that fussy changing the numbers for each casting they did.
    30" x 25.4 is 762mm. Nominal 770 dia wheels, that's just what a 30" machine is. Wheel diameter for bandsaws is not terribly precise either btw. Sometimes a machine is designated a 30" machine for example, and that might mean that's its actual throat width. To make 30" throat size the wheels need to be 30.5" or a tad more because of the guarding on LHS of blade and the need for the band to clear that. Or if your wheels are actually 30" bang on then the throat size will be 29.25" or there abouts.

    So to me the 770 really fits as designating machine size.

    I'm not here shilling for business, but if you need the wheels re-rubbered and machined I can help with that.
    www.vespertools.com

    Quality remains, and the cost is soon forgotton.

  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Vesper View Post
    ...I can't help wonder if the number 770 is indicative of it's size or factory model number. I find it had to believe that is a serial number, foundries didn't usually get that fussy changing the numbers for each casting they did...
    Hi Chris. I'd like to respectfully disagree.
    Firstly, I doubt the Poms would use a metric designation, unless it is a relatively recent machine (say mid-1960s on), but then why have a separate designation with the size in imperial - 30".

    770.jpg

    Secondly, the 770 is stamped on, not cast in.


    But on the subject of cast numbers, I was very surprised to find the order number (WR 6064) on a cast plate attached to my Wadkin 9" buzzer (one of 12 ordered by NZ Railways back in 1926).
    WR 6064.jpg WR 6064a.jpg

    And I was even more impressed to find Thos. Robinson had actually cast the order number (WR 6748) into the main casting of this buzzer a year or two later (one of four ordered by NZ Railways before 1930).

    WR 6748.jpg

    WR 6748a.jpg

    You wouldn't catch a manufacturer doing that these days.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  15. #29
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    Aug 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    Hey yes indeed I am sure you are correct! I will duly go and eat slice of humble pie... ) You are certainly right that no manufacturer of pretty well anything would do that these days beyond a stamped label.

    Thank you for the info and setting me straight.

    Beautiful jointer by the way, that is one heck of an awesome machine, like an aircraft carrier.
    www.vespertools.com

    Quality remains, and the cost is soon forgotton.

  16. #30
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    Dunno about that, those white wogs might not be up to casting numbers in their kit anymore but us colonials sure can.
    Here’s the first Aluminium Ewheel for moi, note the ‘A1’ .
    The boys did another for demos and changed it to ‘A2’.
    Note also my initials and the date.
    The cast iron multitude were dated 2012.
    H.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

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