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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie_6ft View Post
    ...My dad is going to try and weld it together and will see how it holds up.
    If it were me - and if I was going to pin it - I'd pin it first, before welding/brazing (not after).

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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  3. #32
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    Sep 2010
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    Port Sorell, Tasmania
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    Id pretty much do as Rob said previously, Id go with high nickel rods using a stick welder. On a piece like yours I wouldn't pin it, I feel that is more likely to weaken it rather than strengthen. A reasonable weld should be plenty strong enough . I have found that the cast iron on some old machines seems to be of lower quality that modern castings and welding can be difficult but you wont know that until you try. Gave one piece off a 1930's ? bandsaw to a mate who is an experienced boilermaker and he struggled.
    Nickel rods give a nice ductile (pliable) deposit so cracking shouldn't be a problem on a simple piece like yours. If you where welding a wheel where expansion in one place creates stress in the whole casting then much more care needs to be taken with even pre heating of the whole casting and very gentle cooling. My old tafe teacher said that burying a welded casting in cement powder is a good way to cool it slowly, but shouldn't be necessary in your case. That said, a bit of pre-heating cant do any harm. Prepare it well and if you dont get full penetration, turn it over and vee it out then fill that in.
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  4. #33
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    Sep 2008
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    Petone, NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie_6ft View Post
    ...It holds a guard (which I'll need to make up out of something - if I could find some scrap brass channel that would be perfect...
    These old machines often had a timber guard, like this option on Preston bandsaws.

    PR1.jpg

    It prevents someone swinging their arm into the blade, but doesn't actually enclose it.

    On my Preston it's been replaced with a sheetmetal enclosure.

    PR2.jpg PR3.jpg

    Mine came with a wire mesh front over the top wheel - which I've left off because I'd need to modify it to fit my low ceiling. So the enclosure is a bit short. I've been considering a wooden guard similar to the original, but with a groove in it to enclose three sides of the blade, and a hinged ply front to enclose to fourth side.

    I thought this might give you some inspiration.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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