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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Petone, NZ
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    66
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    2,661

    Default Feed Roller Bronze Bearings.

    The next issue concerns the bronze bearings for the roller.

    The bearings are lubricated via a grease nipple set deep into a counterbore in the bearing block. It's set so deep that it has to have a washer to prevent the threaded portion extending down into contact with the roller. The washer isn't a good fit and so the grease nipple only engages a thread or two. I did wonder if a ball oiler might be a better idea, but my spare ball oilers are 3/8" (9.5mm) and the hole is drilled a little over 11mm.

    Tan27.jpg Tan28.jpg

    The next issue is orientation. The grease nipples are located on the outer side of the bearings. This means the side covers of the machine have to be removed to apply grease.

    Tan23.jpg < as found - - - proposed > Tan24.jpg

    If I change the orientation so the nipples are on the inside I will be able to access them by lifting the hinged lid.

    Tan29.jpg

    And while the LH bearing looks the same at both ends, the RH bearing has a chamfer at one end, and just a (worn?) recess at the other.

    Tan25.jpg Tan26.jpg Chamfer (left), recess (right).

    My gut feeling says the chamfer should go against the shoulder on the feed roller - and rotating the bearing so the nipple is inwards would also rotate the chamfer inwards.

    I would value other opinions.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    66
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    2,661

    Default Pressure Bar Adjusters.

    The arrangement of the pressure bar adjusters is a little different to the roller adjusters. While the roller adjusters are intended to be set once (at the factory) and not touched again, the pressure bar adjusters can be adjusted on the fly.

    The stud is fixed into the knurled knob at the top, and the thread at the bottom lifts or lowers the pressure bar.

    Tan31.jpg Assembled view.

    In the picture below, the continuously threaded rod on the left appears to be a replacement - that has not been cut to the correct length.

    Tan30.jpg Exploded view.

    The hollow bolt is the same as used on the feed roller adjuster. The stud is a little longer than the feed roller stud and threaded 1/4" BSW both ends.

    And I haven't even looked at the outfeed roller and bar .

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,661

    Default Feed Roller Grease Nipples.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...The bearings are lubricated via a grease nipple set deep into a counterbore in the bearing block. It's set so deep that it has to have a washer to prevent the threaded portion extending down into contact with the roller. The washer isn't a good fit and so the grease nipple only engages a thread or two...
    Having decided that finding ball oilers to fit the counterbores was unlikely, I decided to try to improve the grease nipples.

    Tan27.jpg

    First issue: on one grease nipple the end of the screw-in portion was showings signs of wear.

    Tan33.jpg

    There's no sign of gouging on the bearing journal. Nevertheless I'm not happy with steel to steel contact so I ground a little off the length to give some clearance.

    Next: that ill-fitting steel washer.

    Tan32.jpg

    I removed the washer and made two replacement copper washers - by drilling a 6.5mm hole and then cutting and filing ~11mm diameter discs from a piece of scrap copper sheet. I then annealed them (on SWIMBOs kitchen stove while she was out).

    Tan34.jpg Tan35.jpg A much better fit.

    And while they are out I pumped new grease through (not knowing the type nor condition of the existing grease).

    Ready to be installed now.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default Two Steps Forward, One Step Backwards.

    One of the roller studs was bent at the bottom where it screws into the bronze bearing. I decided to make up some new studs. I went to the local steel merchant to buy some 1/4" round bar (it's in their online catalogue). None at the local branch. None at any of their other branches in New Zealand. Bugger!

    Did I want 7mm round bar? I declined - it would take a lot of work removing the extra material with the dies. As it turns, out even 6.5mm rod would be tight inside the spring - 7mm wouldn't have fitted.

    So I drilled and tapped a bit of flat steel bar, screwed in the stud and did my best to bend it straight-ish . I didn't want to damage the tapped hole in the bronze bush - hence the tapped steel bar.

    Then I fitted the pressure bar and adjusters back into the machine.

    Next I fitted the left-hand bronze bush and adjuster. But when I tried to pass the roller in from the right-hand side the pressure bar was in the way. I needed to disassemble the pressure bar again. In the end I found that by removing enough of the right-hand pressure bar adjuster to get it's spring out, I could just scrape the feed roller through the gap. Then it took several goes to get everything lined up.

    The infeed side is now ready to set up with correct clearances:
    - infeed roller ~1/32" below the level of the knives;
    - infeed pressure bar level with the knives.

    But I'm off to Dunedin on holiday in the morning (8:45am ferry) so no progress will be made for the next two weeks.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    I love to know how that gouge in the roller occurred.
    Looks like someone tried a piece of gal pipe through it.

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hiroller View Post
    I love to know how that gouge in the roller occurred.
    Looks like someone tried a piece of gal pipe through it.
    Yes, impressive isn't it. Some people really know how to abuse machinery.

    There was another Tanner thicknesser of the same model on Trademe a couple of months ago - in pieces. It was nearby too. $350. I ummed and aahed too long and missed out. It would have been a good source of spare parts - and of a good infeed roller.

    Tanner 45.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default Outfeed - pt.1.

    Have re-hashed the infeed roller and pressure bar assemblies I pulled out the outfeed pressure bar. Also the springs and studs for the outfeed roller along with one of the bearings. Removing the other bearing would have required removing the gearbox, which I wasn't prepared to tackle at this time.

    Tanner 40.jpg

    There was still surface rust on the outfeed roller and removing that revealed a few marks and grooves in the roller surface. I carefully filed the surface around each and every indent to make sure there were no high spots. I hope the remaining depressions don't leave marks on timber going through the machine.

    Tanner 41.jpg Upper cylinder is the cutterblock, lower cylinder is the outfeed roller.

    There were three long (pressure bar) studs and only one shorter (feed roller) stud. And only one pressure bar knurled knob.

    Tanner 42.jpg

    One of the long studs was quite bent, and while straightening it I noticed a crack in the rod. The threaded portion broke off very easily.

    Tanner 43.jpg

    The solution was to turn it into the missing short rod by cutting more thread on the snapped end, and then cutting to length. I ran a die nut down all the other threads and in the process found that the other short rod was bent right on the thread. I had found a 300mm length of 1/4" rod so I made up another short rod.

    Tanner 44.jpg

    Deciding how much thread is required was... challenging. One end of each rod had 1/4" threaded. The one short rod was threaded 7/8" on the other end (I wish I'd measured the others when I had the infeed in bits ). The other end of the three longer rods were threaded 2 x 1 1/8" and 1 1/2". While the one I did measure from the infeed end was threaded 1 3/4". I decided to run with 7/8" for the short rods, and I settled on 1 1/2" for the long rods.


    I've just finished annealing more copper washers for under the the grease nipple and hope to re-install the outfeed roller bronze bearing tomorrow.

    I'm not sure what to do about the missing knurled knob. I had a quick look through my bits and pieces, but I think I'll have to get a new knob made.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
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    Posts
    2,661

    Default Outfeed - pt.2.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...I've just finished annealing more copper washers for under the the grease nipple and hope to re-install the outfeed roller bronze bearing tomorrow...
    Yup, I got the bearing back in, and fitted the adjusters - also the chain drive.

    Tanner 45.jpg

    Next step will be setting the recommended heights for the pressure bars and rollers. I have one of these.

    Wadkin gauge.jpg Wadkin "Precision Cutter Setter".

    I'll have to work out what the graduations are (probably thousandths of an inch).

    I'm also repainting the top cover (weather permitting).

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
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    Posts
    2,661

    Default Parts Diagram.

    Hot off the press (just got sent this today by a friend)...



    Unfortunately there's no list of the parts - with descriptions.

    This is for the later version of the Tanner 12" thicknesser (with variable speed).

    Cheers, Vann.

    (also posted in the Manuals section)
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
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    2,661

    Default Pamphlet.

    I was also sent this:





    Which leaves me wondering if mine is a GB 165, a GB 160A, or a GP 160B (or a GFB 165 - as found on an "Instructions" manual). I guess, as mine has a 3hp 3ph motor, it can't be a GP 160B.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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